Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

See the World From a Polar Bear's Point Of View

Science
See the World From a Polar Bear's Point Of View

Polar bears have always been mysterious creatures, but now, with a new tracking and observation method, scientists will be able to find out more about their habits.

Researchers have put satellite tracking collars on polar bears before, but these new trackers will also provide scientists with an idea of what they do, according to the New York Times.

Photo credit: Kt Miller, Polar Bears International

Anthony Pagano, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, has been testing accelerometers on the collars of tracked polar bears. Accelerometers measure acceleration forces that can be either static (due to gravity) or, in this case, dynamic (due to movement or vibrations). It's basically a Fitbit for polar bears, the New York Times said.

Now, instead of just a tracking device, polar bear collars will be fitted with an accelerometer and a camera. With data from both of the new devices, scientists can link certain acceleration and movement with activities like walking, swimming, eating or playing.

All the polar bears Pagano is tracking are females because "the necks of males are wider than their heads, so the collars won't stay on," according to the Times.

This experiment has captured some never-before-seen footage of polar bear life. A life that is rapidly being changed due to climate change.

Watch the New York Times' video about this project here:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

Nepal's Extinct Bird Spotted After Disappearing for 178 Years

Newborn Sea Otter Reunited With Mom in Sweet and Rare Rescue

Arctic, Greenland Stuck in Feedback Loop of Melting

World's First 'Spotty Dog' and Cow-Like Sheep Created Using Gene Editing

Sunrise over planet Earth. Elements of this image furnished by NASA. Elen11 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

On Thursday, April 22, the world will celebrate Earth Day, the largest non-religious holiday on the globe.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
NASA has teamed up with non-profit Carbon Mapper to help pinpoint greenhouse gas sources. aapsky / Getty Images

NASA is teaming up with an innovative non-profit to hunt for greenhouse gas super-emitters responsible for the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Trending
schnuddel / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Jenna McGuire

Commonly used herbicides across the U.S. contain highly toxic undisclosed "inert" ingredients that are lethal to bumblebees, according to a new study published Friday in the Journal of Applied Ecology.

Read More Show Less
A warming climate can lead to lake stratification, including toxic algal blooms. UpdogDesigns / Getty Images

By Ayesha Tandon

New research shows that lake "stratification periods" – a seasonal separation of water into layers – will last longer in a warmer climate.

Read More Show Less
A view of Lake Powell from Romana Mesa, Utah, on Sept. 8, 2018. DEA / S. AMANTINI / Contributor / Getty Images

By Robert Glennon

Interstate water disputes are as American as apple pie. States often think a neighboring state is using more than its fair share from a river, lake or aquifer that crosses borders.

Read More Show Less