Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

See the First Summer Solstice Full Moon in Nearly 70 Years

Science
See the First Summer Solstice Full Moon in Nearly 70 Years

Today marks a special day for astronomy enthusiasts. The summer solstice and June's strawberry moon will coincide for the first time in nearly 70 years.

Full strawberry moon. Anca Emanuela Teaca / Alamy

In the Northern Hemisphere, the summer solstice marks the longest day of the year and the official start of summer. The solstice officially starts at 6:34 p.m. ET, the exact time the sun will be in the northernmost position in the sky, directly over the Tropic of Cancer, according to National Geographic.

As the sun sets in the west, the moon will rise in the east. It will fill the sky with rose-tinted light.

This astronomical phenomenon hasn't occurred since 1948, the Baltimore Sun reported.

While the summer solstice and June full moon combination is rare, it is actually mathematically predicted to happen every 15 years, Flarmer's Almanac reported. During a live stream event hosted tonight by the almanac and Slooh, astronomer Bob Berman will discuss why its been so long since the last occurrence.

“Having a full moon land smack on the solstice is a truly rare event," Berman said. “We probably won't push people off pyramids like the Mayans did, but Slooh will very much celebrate this extraordinary day of light with fascinating factoids and amazing live telescope feeds."

The Algonquin tribe called June's full moon the strawberry moon because it marked the time of year they should gather ripening fruit, according to the Farmer's Almanac. In Europe, June's full moon is also known as the Rose or the Honey moon.

Raven Fon wrote an article for The Earth Child suggesting five different ways to celebrate the solstice/full moon combination event. Ideas include:

  • Burning herbs. Fon suggests burning any or all of the following herbs to celebrate the solstice: Ruta, Verbena, Misletoe, Lavender, Thyme, Fennel, Plantain, Artemisia or the grass of St. John.
  • Drink to the sun. Enjoy a cup of cinnamon or ginger tea to honor the sun and its warmth. Make a celebratory toast.
  • Set your intention. Fon said the moon has significant manifestation powers, so this astronomical phenomenon is a great time to set your intention(s). Make a list of things you want to bring into and release from your life. The list can include behaviors, goals and desires.
  • Just enjoy the event. The solstice/full moon even is time to be free, Fon wrote. She suggests putting some music on and dancing to express yourself.
  • Take a dip. Fon suggests finding a body of water and taking a dip in it. "As full moon pushed and pulls the waters of our Earth, a purification takes place." Taking a dip will rejuvenate and invigorate your soul, she said.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE:

NASA: Porter Ranch Gas Leak Was So Big It Could Be Seen From Space

See the World From a Polar Bear's Point Of View

NASA Finds Enormous Planet 3,700 Light Years Away

World's First 'Spotty Dog' and Cow-Like Sheep Created Using Gene Editing

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less