Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Secret Videos Expose Chevron's Corruption in Ecuadorian Oil Spill

Energy

There's a new development in the case against Chevron for its failure to address decades of contamination in the Ecuadorian Amazon. An apparent Chevron whistleblower sent dozens of internal company videos to Amazon Watch with a note saying "I hope this is useful for you in your trial against Texaco/Chevron. [signed] A Friend from Chevron."

The videos reveal Chevron employees secretly visiting the company's former well sites in Ecuador to find samples that didn't contain crude oil to use in soil and water samples at later site inspections.

The videos—some of which can be seen on Amazon Watch—show Chevron employees and consultants secretly visiting the company's former well sites in Ecuador to find samples that didn't contain crude oil to use in soil and water samples at later site inspections when the presiding trial judge would be there to monitor the testing.

The problem is that they couldn't do it. In the videos, the employees can be heard joking about how they just can't find a sample without crude oil in it. I don't see anyone in the surrounding community laughing in the video when they talk about a nearby pond "oozing" with crude that is killing their cows and their own people.

"This is smoking gun evidence that shows Chevron hands are dirty—first for contaminating the region, and then for manipulating and hiding critical evidence," said Paul Paz y Miño, director of outreach at Amazon Watch. Chevron testified before both U.S. and Ecuadorian courts that the sites had been remediated in the mid-1990s.

"The videos show company technicians discussing in stark terms the presence of oil pollution in places where they told the court it didn't exist. This is corruption caught on tape," said Kevin Koenig, Ecuador program director at Amazon Watch, who has been working with the affected communities for two decades.

"After reviewing 105 technical evidentiary reports documenting extensive pollution, eight appellate judges, including Ecuador's Supreme Court, affirmed Chevron's liability in 2013 after 11 years of legal proceedings in the company's chosen forum," says Amazon Watch. "Damages were set at $9.5 billion, but Chevron thus far has refused to pay."

The case has made it all the way to the International Court of Justice at The Hague, which ruled a few weeks ago that the Ecuadorean court's ruling should be upheld. The case has, of course, been appealed by Chevron, whose own CEO, John Watson, "promised the Ecuadorians a lifetime of litigation, saying the 22-year-old legal battle will end when 'the plaintiffs' lawyers give up'" reports Amazon Watch.

In case you didn't think Chevron's actions were appalling enough: In the appeal, Chevron is arguing that not only should it not have to pay for the decades worth of damage, but that the Ecuadorian people should foot the bill for the clean up, according to Ecuador’s Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño, who spoke about the case with Amy Goodman and Juan Gonzalez on Democracy Now!

Additional videos are being reviewed by Amazon Watch and will be released in the coming weeks. Watch one of the tapes below:

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Will Chevron and Exxon Ever Be Held Responsible for Decades of Contamination

Jon Stewart Hammers Gov. Christie Over Staggering Exxon Spill Settlement

Big Coal Seeks Big Bailout Despite Strong Opposition

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Marco Bottigelli / Moment / Getty Images

By James Shulmeister

Climate Explained is a collaboration between The Conversation, Stuff and the New Zealand Science Media Centre to answer your questions about climate change.

If you have a question you'd like an expert to answer, please send it to climate.change@stuff.co.nz

Read More Show Less
Luxy Images / Getty Images

By Jo Harper

Investment in U.S. offshore wind projects are set to hit $78 billion (€69 billion) this decade, in contrast with an estimated $82 billion for U.S. offshore oil and gasoline projects, Wood Mackenzie data shows. This would be a remarkable feat only four years after the first offshore wind plant — the 30 megawatt (MW) Block Island Wind Farm off the coast of Rhode Island — started operating in U.S. waters.

Read More Show Less
Giacomo Berardi / Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed both the strengths and limitations of globalization. The crisis has made people aware of how industrialized food production can be, and just how far food can travel to get to the local supermarket. There are many benefits to this system, including low prices for consumers and larger, even global, markets for producers. But there are also costs — to the environment, workers, small farmers and to a region or individual nation's food security.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Joe Leech

The human body comprises around 60% water.

It's commonly recommended that you drink eight 8-ounce (237-mL) glasses of water per day (the 8×8 rule).

Read More Show Less

By Michael Svoboda

The enduring pandemic will make conventional forms of travel difficult if not impossible this summer. As a result, many will consider virtual alternatives for their vacations, including one of the oldest forms of virtual reality – books.

Read More Show Less
Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility on Thursday accused NOAA of ignoring its own scientists' findings about the endangerment of the North Atlantic right whale. Lauren Packard / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Julia Conley

As the North Atlantic right whale was placed on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's list of critically endangered species Thursday, environmental protection groups accusing the U.S. government of bowing to fishing and fossil fuel industry pressure to downplay the threat and failing to enact common-sense restrictions to protect the animals.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Pexels

By Beth Ann Mayer

Since even moderate-intensity workouts offer a slew of benefits, walking is a good choice for people looking to stay healthy.

Read More Show Less