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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Several innovative companies have begun brainstorming better ways to repurpose old wind turbine blades. xu wu / Getty Images

When wind turbine blades reach the end of their usefulness, most are sawed into transportable pieces and hauled to landfills, where they never break down. Because of the resources and energy that go into producing these blades, this type of disposal is inefficient and wasteful. Recently, several innovative companies have begun brainstorming better ways to repurpose this green technology after it goes offline.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A female condor above the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County, California. Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

One environmental downside to wind turbines is their impact on birds.

Read More Show Less
AndreyPopov / iStock / Getty Images

Many homeowners can benefit from installing solar panels, harnessing the sun's energy to help reduce or even eliminate their dependence on traditional utilities. Although solar panels can be expensive, solar loans make residential systems more accessible to homeowners.

Indeed, if you live in an area that gets consistent year-round exposure to the sun, solar panels can be an effective way to lower your home's energy costs while minimizing your environmental footprint. The biggest obstacle to solar adoption is the initial cost of solar panels.

All in, solar panel installation costs typically range from $10,000 to $35,000. In this article, we'll explain how solar loans can make that initial investment much easier to handle.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It should not be relied on for and is not intended to provide accounting, legal or tax advice.

Solar Loan Basics

So, how do solar loans work, exactly? Well, they're similar to home improvement loans, or any other type of purchase loan: They enable you to buy a residential solar system and pay it off over time.

There are plenty of solar loan options to choose from. For example, to finance solar panels, you can typically choose from any of the following:

  • An unsecured personal loan
  • A home equity loan or line of credit
  • In-house financing through your solar installation company

For the most part, the terms and conditions of solar loans mimic those of any other standard loan. Specifically:

  • Getting a lower interest rate means having a lower overall cost to borrow.
  • A shorter loan term generally means higher monthly loan payments but a lower overall cost to borrow.
  • Loans are available in a wide array of interest rates, term lengths, loan amounts, credit requirements, etc.

An important thing to note is that homeowners who finance their solar energy systems with a loan are still eligible for the federal solar tax credit. This gives you a credit worth 26% of your total solar installation costs.

How to Choose the Right Solar Loan

As you seek the best solar loan for your situation, there are a number of factors to keep in mind. These include:

  • Monthly payment amount: If you end up choosing a shorter loan term (i.e., a loan that you must pay off in a shorter amount of time), your monthly payments will probably be higher. The overall cost of the loan will be lower, but it's nevertheless important to consider the impact on your household budget.
  • Down payment amount: Depending on the loan you choose, you may or may not be required to put down a payment on the solar panels. Generally, larger down payments will mean lower interest rates and a more affordable loan overall.
  • Fees: Some solar lenders may charge prepayment penalties or monthly fees in addition to your monthly principal and interest payments. Always make sure you get fee information upfront, so as to ensure there are no surprises on your loan statement.

Secured Vs. Unsecured Solar Loans

Another important factor to consider is whether you'll get a secured solar loan or an unsecured solar loan. Here's what homeowners should know about these two options:

  • Secured loans are usually connected to some piece of collateral, such as a piece of equity in your house; this provides the lender with some protection. If you fail to make your payments, the lender can claim their piece of collateral. Because the lender has some insurance, secured loans usually offer lower interest rates and more favorable terms overall.
  • Unsecured loans do not have any collateral or security provisions for the lender. They represent a greater risk on the lender's part, and thus usually come with higher interest rates and less favorable terms.

Ultimately, the decision about which type of loan to seek comes down to this question: Do you have enough equity in your home to take out a secured loan? If so, and if you are willing to use some of that home equity to pay for solar panels, then a secured loan may be the smarter choice overall.

How to Get Low Interest Rates for Solar Loans

In addition to choosing the right type of loan, there are other steps you can take to keep your interest rates manageable when you finance a solar panel system:

  • Shop around: It's usually best not to go with the very first lender you find. Spend some time shopping around and comparing rates. Most lenders will give you a free quote that's good for a number of days while you compare offers from other companies.
  • Have someone co-sign: Having a co-signer on your solar loan — especially one with excellent credit — creates extra assurances for the lender and will usually result in more favorable rates.
  • Improve your credit score: There are several ways to improve your credit score to get a lower interest rate on a solar loan. For example, you can pay down old debts and credit card balances, be on time with monthly bill payments, and ensure you don't open any new credit cards as you apply for your solar loan.

Also be aware that there are things you can do to pay less over time other than getting a lower interest rate. Examples include choosing a shorter repayment period, looking for discounts like paperless or auto-pay discounts, avoiding loans with high fees and, if applicable, making a more substantial down payment.

Local Solar Loan Programs

Homeowners who are interested in going solar should also know about Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) loan programs. According to the Department of Energy, PACE programs "allow a property owner to finance the up-front cost of energy or other eligible improvements on a property and then pay the costs back over time through a voluntary assessment." What makes these programs unique is that the assessment is tied to the property itself, not to the individual.

PACE financing legislation exists in some form in 36 states plus Washington D.C. A handful of states have separate loan programs for homeowners interested in solar. Here are some current programs worth knowing about:

State Solar Loan Program Maximum
Loan Amount
Interest Rate Longest
Repayment Term
Connecticut Energy Conservation Loan Program $25,000 0% to 7% 12 years
Louisiana Home Energy Loan Program (HELP) $6,000 2% 5 years
Michigan Michigan Saves Home Energy Financing $50,000 4.44% to 7.90% 15 years
North Carolina State-regulated municipal loan options Varies Up to 8% 20 years
Ohio Energy Conservation for Ohioans
(ECO-Link) Program
$50,000 3% APR reduction
on bank loans
7 years

Additionally, certain municipalities and local utility companies may offer low-interest solar loans. We recommend researching your specific area before turning to banks or credit institutions.

Where to Get a Solar Loan

If your state doesn't have its own solar energy loan program or you're not eligible for enrollment, there are plenty of other places to get solar loans. Some of the best places to check include:

  • Credit unions
  • Lending institutions
  • In-house financing through your solar installer (which will come from a third-party solar lender)

Again, it's crucial to shop around and compare rates before deciding on which solar lender is the best fit for your needs. To get started with a free quote and find solar loan information from a top solar company in your area, you can fill out the form below.

Frequently Asked Questions: Solar Loans

Are solar loans worth it?

There are various factors to consider as you decide whether getting a solar loan is worth it. Solar loans help you increase the value of your property, lower utility bills, minimize your impact on the environment and potentially claim some tax incentives. Then again, financing does decrease your overall savings, and extends the break-even point for your residential solar system.

Do banks do solar loans?

Some banks do offer solar loans, though often with interest rates that exceed what you'd pay elsewhere. It may be worth checking with your local bank, but always remember to shop around and compare.

What is the best way to finance solar?

If you have sufficient home equity, a secured solar loan is often the most cost-effective approach. If you don't have sufficient home equity, an unsecured solar loan can work just fine.

What type of loan is a solar panel loan?

Solar panel loans are generally considered to be a type of personal loan, similar to a home improvement loan.

Can you buy a solar battery with a solar loan?

Most often the answer is yes, but make sure you double-check the terms of your loan.

Matteo Colombo / Moment / Getty Images

For nearly 100 years, the Empire State Building has stood as a testament to the industriousness and economic power of the United States. Now, it can also be considered a beacon for the future of sustainable energy. Empire State Realty Trust (ESRT) signed a deal in early February to convert the Empire State Building, along with all of its other real estate holdings, to 100% renewable energy.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Denmark already has wind parks, like this one in Copenhagen, but the country plans to build its biggest one yet on an artificial island by 2033. Flottmynd / Getty Images

Denmark approved plans on Thursday to construct an artificial island in the North Sea and use it as clean energy hub.

Read More Show Less
Fields of solar panels line rolling green hills. LeoPatrizi / Getty Images

By Jenna McGuire

The United States has the resources and technology to shift away from fossil fuels and build an energy system entirely run on renewables, according to a new report released Thursday by Environment America Research & Policy Center and the Frontier Group.

Read More Show Less
The western edge of the Greenland ice sheet in West Greenland as seen from the air. Ashley Cooper / Getty Images

As the world's ice sheets melt at an increasing rate, researchers are looking for explanations beyond just a hotter climate. A recent study found one answer may lie in the dust.

Read More Show Less
A seagull flies in front of the Rampion offshore wind farm in the United Kingdom. Neil / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

A key part of the United States' clean energy transition has started to take shape, but you may need to squint to see it. About 2,000 wind turbines could be built far offshore, in federal waters off the Atlantic Coast, in the next 10 years. And more are expected.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A plume of smoke from wildfires burning in the Angeles National Forest is seen from downtown Los Angeles on Aug. 29, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

California is bracing for rare January wildfires this week amid damaging Santa Ana winds coupled with unusually hot and dry winter weather.

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Mount Rushmore National Memorial has been forced to close because of the Keystone Fire and 244 Fire. Jacobs Stock Photography Ltd / Getty Images

Three wildfires raging in South Dakota have shuttered Mount Rushmore and forced hundreds to flee their homes.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Renewable energy projects boomed in 2020, including solar, wind and hydropower. zhihao / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

Despite the difficulties associated with the Covid-19 pandemic, the world added a record amount of new renewable energy capacity in 2020, according to data released Monday by the International Renewable Energy Agency.

Read More Show Less
A satellite image shows Hurricane Ida crossing western Cuba. NOAA

Hurricane Ida entered the Gulf of Mexico late Friday, as people in the United States' southern state of Louisiana evacuated high-risk areas and stocked up on essentials.

The hurricane is expected to intensify as it reaches the northern Gulf Coast.

Read More Show Less
The forecast path of Hurricane Larry. National Hurricane Center

As rains from Hurricane Ida inundate the Northeast, another hurricane has formed in the eastern tropical Atlantic.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Several innovative companies have begun brainstorming better ways to repurpose old wind turbine blades. xu wu / Getty Images

When wind turbine blades reach the end of their usefulness, most are sawed into transportable pieces and hauled to landfills, where they never break down. Because of the resources and energy that go into producing these blades, this type of disposal is inefficient and wasteful. Recently, several innovative companies have begun brainstorming better ways to repurpose this green technology after it goes offline.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A female condor above the Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge in Ventura County, California. Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

One environmental downside to wind turbines is their impact on birds.

Read More Show Less
AndreyPopov / iStock / Getty Images

Many homeowners can benefit from installing solar panels, harnessing the sun's energy to help reduce or even eliminate their dependence on traditional utilities. Although solar panels can be expensive, solar loans make residential systems more accessible to homeowners.

Indeed, if you live in an area that gets consistent year-round exposure to the sun, solar panels can be an effective way to lower your home's energy costs while minimizing your environmental footprint. The biggest obstacle to solar adoption is the initial cost of solar panels.

All in, solar panel installation costs typically range from $10,000 to $35,000. In this article, we'll explain how solar loans can make that initial investment much easier to handle.

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It should not be relied on for and is not intended to provide accounting, legal or tax advice.

Solar Loan Basics

So, how do solar loans work, exactly? Well, they're similar to home improvement loans, or any other type of purchase loan: They enable you to buy a residential solar system and pay it off over time.

There are plenty of solar loan options to choose from. For example, to finance solar panels, you can typically choose from any of the following:

  • An unsecured personal loan
  • A home equity loan or line of credit
  • In-house financing through your solar installation company

For the most part, the terms and conditions of solar loans mimic those of any other standard loan. Specifically:

  • Getting a lower interest rate means having a lower overall cost to borrow.
  • A shorter loan term generally means higher monthly loan payments but a lower overall cost to borrow.
  • Loans are available in a wide array of interest rates, term lengths, loan amounts, credit requirements, etc.

An important thing to note is that homeowners who finance their solar energy systems with a loan are still eligible for the federal solar tax credit. This gives you a credit worth 26% of your total solar installation costs.

How to Choose the Right Solar Loan

As you seek the best solar loan for your situation, there are a number of factors to keep in mind. These include:

  • Monthly payment amount: If you end up choosing a shorter loan term (i.e., a loan that you must pay off in a shorter amount of time), your monthly payments will probably be higher. The overall cost of the loan will be lower, but it's nevertheless important to consider the impact on your household budget.
  • Down payment amount: Depending on the loan you choose, you may or may not be required to put down a payment on the solar panels. Generally, larger down payments will mean lower interest rates and a more affordable loan overall.
  • Fees: Some solar lenders may charge prepayment penalties or monthly fees in addition to your monthly principal and interest payments. Always make sure you get fee information upfront, so as to ensure there are no surprises on your loan statement.

Secured Vs. Unsecured Solar Loans

Another important factor to consider is whether you'll get a secured solar loan or an unsecured solar loan. Here's what homeowners should know about these two options:

  • Secured loans are usually connected to some piece of collateral, such as a piece of equity in your house; this provides the lender with some protection. If you fail to make your payments, the lender can claim their piece of collateral. Because the lender has some insurance, secured loans usually offer lower interest rates and more favorable terms overall.
  • Unsecured loans do not have any collateral or security provisions for the lender. They represent a greater risk on the lender's part, and thus usually come with higher interest rates and less favorable terms.

Ultimately, the decision about which type of loan to seek comes down to this question: Do you have enough equity in your home to take out a secured loan? If so, and if you are willing to use some of that home equity to pay for solar panels, then a secured loan may be the smarter choice overall.

How to Get Low Interest Rates for Solar Loans

In addition to choosing the right type of loan, there are other steps you can take to keep your interest rates manageable when you finance a solar panel system:

  • Shop around: It's usually best not to go with the very first lender you find. Spend some time shopping around and comparing rates. Most lenders will give you a free quote that's good for a number of days while you compare offers from other companies.
  • Have someone co-sign: Having a co-signer on your solar loan — especially one with excellent credit — creates extra assurances for the lender and will usually result in more favorable rates.
  • Improve your credit score: There are several ways to improve your credit score to get a lower interest rate on a solar loan. For example, you can pay down old debts and credit card balances, be on time with monthly bill payments, and ensure you don't open any new credit cards as you apply for your solar loan.

Also be aware that there are things you can do to pay less over time other than getting a lower interest rate. Examples include choosing a shorter repayment period, looking for discounts like paperless or auto-pay discounts, avoiding loans with high fees and, if applicable, making a more substantial down payment.

Local Solar Loan Programs

Homeowners who are interested in going solar should also know about Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) loan programs. According to the Department of Energy, PACE programs "allow a property owner to finance the up-front cost of energy or other eligible improvements on a property and then pay the costs back over time through a voluntary assessment." What makes these programs unique is that the assessment is tied to the property itself, not to the individual.

PACE financing legislation exists in some form in 36 states plus Washington D.C. A handful of states have separate loan programs for homeowners interested in solar. Here are some current programs worth knowing about:

State Solar Loan Program Maximum
Loan Amount
Interest Rate Longest
Repayment Term
Connecticut Energy Conservation Loan Program $25,000 0% to 7% 12 years
Louisiana Home Energy Loan Program (HELP) $6,000 2% 5 years
Michigan Michigan Saves Home Energy Financing $50,000 4.44% to 7.90% 15 years
North Carolina State-regulated municipal loan options Varies Up to 8% 20 years
Ohio Energy Conservation for Ohioans
(ECO-Link) Program
$50,000 3% APR reduction
on bank loans
7 years

Additionally, certain municipalities and local utility companies may offer low-interest solar loans. We recommend researching your specific area before turning to banks or credit institutions.

Where to Get a Solar Loan

If your state doesn't have its own solar energy loan program or you're not eligible for enrollment, there are plenty of other places to get solar loans. Some of the best places to check include:

  • Credit unions
  • Lending institutions
  • In-house financing through your solar installer (which will come from a third-party solar lender)

Again, it's crucial to shop around and compare rates before deciding on which solar lender is the best fit for your needs. To get started with a free quote and find solar loan information from a top solar company in your area, you can fill out the form below.

Frequently Asked Questions: Solar Loans

Are solar loans worth it?

There are various factors to consider as you decide whether getting a solar loan is worth it. Solar loans help you increase the value of your property, lower utility bills, minimize your impact on the environment and potentially claim some tax incentives. Then again, financing does decrease your overall savings, and extends the break-even point for your residential solar system.

Do banks do solar loans?

Some banks do offer solar loans, though often with interest rates that exceed what you'd pay elsewhere. It may be worth checking with your local bank, but always remember to shop around and compare.

What is the best way to finance solar?

If you have sufficient home equity, a secured solar loan is often the most cost-effective approach. If you don't have sufficient home equity, an unsecured solar loan can work just fine.

What type of loan is a solar panel loan?

Solar panel loans are generally considered to be a type of personal loan, similar to a home improvement loan.

Can you buy a solar battery with a solar loan?

Most often the answer is yes, but make sure you double-check the terms of your loan.

Matteo Colombo / Moment / Getty Images

For nearly 100 years, the Empire State Building has stood as a testament to the industriousness and economic power of the United States. Now, it can also be considered a beacon for the future of sustainable energy. Empire State Realty Trust (ESRT) signed a deal in early February to convert the Empire State Building, along with all of its other real estate holdings, to 100% renewable energy.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Denmark already has wind parks, like this one in Copenhagen, but the country plans to build its biggest one yet on an artificial island by 2033. Flottmynd / Getty Images

Denmark approved plans on Thursday to construct an artificial island in the North Sea and use it as clean energy hub.

Read More Show Less
Fields of solar panels line rolling green hills. LeoPatrizi / Getty Images

By Jenna McGuire

The United States has the resources and technology to shift away from fossil fuels and build an energy system entirely run on renewables, according to a new report released Thursday by Environment America Research & Policy Center and the Frontier Group.

Read More Show Less
The western edge of the Greenland ice sheet in West Greenland as seen from the air. Ashley Cooper / Getty Images

As the world's ice sheets melt at an increasing rate, researchers are looking for explanations beyond just a hotter climate. A recent study found one answer may lie in the dust.

Read More Show Less
A seagull flies in front of the Rampion offshore wind farm in the United Kingdom. Neil / CC BY 2.0

By Tara Lohan

A key part of the United States' clean energy transition has started to take shape, but you may need to squint to see it. About 2,000 wind turbines could be built far offshore, in federal waters off the Atlantic Coast, in the next 10 years. And more are expected.

Read More Show Less
Trending