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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A monarch butterfly sits on milkweed. Mara Koenig / USFWS

By Kenny Stancil

The Center for Food Safety on Wednesday denounced the Biden administration's Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for arguing that Roundup should remain on U.S. shelves for an undisclosed period of time even after admitting that the Trump-era review of glyphosate — the key ingredient found in Roundup, the world's most widely used herbicide — was flawed and requires a do-over.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland announced a pair of climate-related secretarial orders on Friday, April 16. U.S. Department of the Interior

By Jessica Corbett

As the Biden administration reviews the U.S. government's federal fossil fuels program and faces pressure to block any new dirty energy development, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland won praise from environmentalists on Friday for issuing a pair of climate-related secretarial orders.

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Frederic Stevens/ Getty Images News / Getty Images

For nearly as long as solar panels have been gracing rooftops and barren land, creative people have been searching out additional surfaces that can be tiled with energy-generating photovoltaic (PV) panels. The idea has been pretty straightforward: if solar panels generate energy simply by facing the sun, then humans could collectively reduce our reliance on coal, oil, gas and other polluting fuels by maximizing our aggregate solar surface area.

So, what kind of unobstructed surfaces are built in every community and in between every major city across the globe? Highways and streets. With this in mind, the futuristic vision of laying thousands, or even millions, of solar panels on top of the asphalt of interstates and main streets was born.

While the concept art looked like a still from a sci-fi film, many inventors, businesses and investors saw these panels as a golden path toward clean energy and profit. Ultimately, though, the technology and economics ended up letting down those working behind each solar roadway project — from initial concepts in the early 2000s to the first solar roadway actually opened in France in 2016, they all flopped.

In the years since the concept of solar roadways went viral, solar PV has continued to improve in technology and drop in price. So, with a 2021 lens, is it time to re-run the numbers and see if a solar roadway could potentially deliver on that early promise? We dig in to find out.

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A Shell oil drilling rig off the coast of Alaska in the Chukchi Sea on May 21, 2015. Orjan F. Ellingvag / Corbis via Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

A federal appeals court on Tuesday dealt the final blow to former President Donald Trump's attempt to open nearly 130 million acres of territory in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans to oil and gas drilling.

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Trending
A demonstrator stands in front of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the Science March in Washington, DC on Earth Day, April 22, 2017. Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on Wednesday it will remove more than 40 members of scientific advisory panels appointed under the previous administration in an effort to reduce the heavy influence of regulated industries over the regulatory process.

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Migratory white pelicans are seen along an oil-slicked shoreline in Barataria Bay, Louisiana on Dec. 5, 2010, about eight months after the BP oil spill. Mario Tama / Getty Images

On Monday the Biden administration restored protections for migratory birds from accidental, industry-caused deaths.

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EPA.gov

By Andrea Germanos

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on Thursday brought back its climate change website — a resource the former Trump administration had yanked.

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An offshore wind farm at Block Island, Rhode Island on Aug. 14, 2016. Mark Harrington / Newsday RM via Getty Images

By Erin Baker and Matthew Lackner

The United States' offshore wind industry is tiny, with just seven wind turbines operating off Rhode Island and Virginia. The few attempts to build large-scale wind farms like Europe's have run into long delays, but that may be about to change.

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Trending
The meatpacking industry pushed back against COVID-19 safety restrictions in spring 2020. Ben Hasty / MediaNews Group / Reading Eagle / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Documents obtained from the United States Department of Agriculture by the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen and published Wednesday reveal how leading players in the meatpacking industry—one of the hardest-hit by the coronavirus pandemic—fought the minimal efforts imposed by the Trump administration to prevent the spread of Covid-19 in meat processing plants last spring.

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The administration went after the Endangered Species Act by finalizing a rule that narrows the definition of habitat to only areas that currently support a species. Chase Dekker Wild-Life Images / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

This holiday season just about everything was different. Vacations were postponed. Parties and family get-togethers were canceled or moved online as folks hunkered down at the request of public-health officials. But one thing continued as usual: President Trump's attacks on the environment.

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EPA Moves to Protect Alaska's Bristol Bay, Blocking Major Gold Mine

"Today we celebrate. Tomorrow, we get back to the hard work of seeing this through."

Popular
Protestors gathered in Dillingham, Alaska, for a rally against the Pebble Mine on June 6, 2007. Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Conservationists, local tribes, and commercial fishers celebrated on Thursday the Biden administration's move to permanently protect Alaska's Bristol Bay watershed from the proposed Pebble Mine and similarly destructive projects.

"Placing a massive mine at the headwaters of the world's greatest, most productive wild sockeye salmon fishery has been a terrible idea from the start," said Kristen Miller, acting executive director of Alaska Wilderness League, "and today's administrative decision and its commitment to following science and protecting clean water is directly attributable to the decadeslong, tribal-led effort to protect Bristol Bay."

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Trump signs House Joint Resolution 41, removing some Dodd-Frank regulations on oil and gas companies, on Feb. 14, 2017. SAUL LOEB / AFP via Getty Images

A new report by a commission of health experts found 22,000 deaths in 2019 were caused by Trump's failed environmental policies alone.

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Shasta dam and lake near Redding, California. Kelly M. Grow / California Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

In the aftermath of the Nov. 3 election, President Donald Trump has tried every trick in the book to avoid facing the reality of his loss. A barrage of lawsuits accompanied by disinformation campaigns has attempted to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the election.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A monarch butterfly sits on milkweed. Mara Koenig / USFWS

By Kenny Stancil

The Center for Food Safety on Wednesday denounced the Biden administration's Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for arguing that Roundup should remain on U.S. shelves for an undisclosed period of time even after admitting that the Trump-era review of glyphosate — the key ingredient found in Roundup, the world's most widely used herbicide — was flawed and requires a do-over.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland announced a pair of climate-related secretarial orders on Friday, April 16. U.S. Department of the Interior

By Jessica Corbett

As the Biden administration reviews the U.S. government's federal fossil fuels program and faces pressure to block any new dirty energy development, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland won praise from environmentalists on Friday for issuing a pair of climate-related secretarial orders.

Read More Show Less
Frederic Stevens/ Getty Images News / Getty Images

For nearly as long as solar panels have been gracing rooftops and barren land, creative people have been searching out additional surfaces that can be tiled with energy-generating photovoltaic (PV) panels. The idea has been pretty straightforward: if solar panels generate energy simply by facing the sun, then humans could collectively reduce our reliance on coal, oil, gas and other polluting fuels by maximizing our aggregate solar surface area.

So, what kind of unobstructed surfaces are built in every community and in between every major city across the globe? Highways and streets. With this in mind, the futuristic vision of laying thousands, or even millions, of solar panels on top of the asphalt of interstates and main streets was born.

While the concept art looked like a still from a sci-fi film, many inventors, businesses and investors saw these panels as a golden path toward clean energy and profit. Ultimately, though, the technology and economics ended up letting down those working behind each solar roadway project — from initial concepts in the early 2000s to the first solar roadway actually opened in France in 2016, they all flopped.

In the years since the concept of solar roadways went viral, solar PV has continued to improve in technology and drop in price. So, with a 2021 lens, is it time to re-run the numbers and see if a solar roadway could potentially deliver on that early promise? We dig in to find out.

Read More Show Less
A Shell oil drilling rig off the coast of Alaska in the Chukchi Sea on May 21, 2015. Orjan F. Ellingvag / Corbis via Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

A federal appeals court on Tuesday dealt the final blow to former President Donald Trump's attempt to open nearly 130 million acres of territory in the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans to oil and gas drilling.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A demonstrator stands in front of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency during the Science March in Washington, DC on Earth Day, April 22, 2017. Bill Clark / CQ Roll Call

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on Wednesday it will remove more than 40 members of scientific advisory panels appointed under the previous administration in an effort to reduce the heavy influence of regulated industries over the regulatory process.

Read More Show Less
Migratory white pelicans are seen along an oil-slicked shoreline in Barataria Bay, Louisiana on Dec. 5, 2010, about eight months after the BP oil spill. Mario Tama / Getty Images

On Monday the Biden administration restored protections for migratory birds from accidental, industry-caused deaths.

Read More Show Less
EPA.gov