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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Italy Bans Large Cruise Ships From Venice

The restriction will come into effect at the beginning of August, the Italian government has confirmed. Campaigners say the liners cause damage to Venice's ecosystem.

Popular
MSC Magnifica is seen from one of the canals leading into the Venice Lagoon on June 9, 2019 in Venice. Miguel MEDINA / AFP / Getty Images

Large cruise ships will be banned from entering the Venice lagoon as of August 1, the Italian government announced Tuesday.

It follows years of warnings they risk causing irreparable damage to Venice's ecosystem.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Miami and Miami Beach were built right up to the waterfront, with little room for nature. Shobeir Ansari / Getty Images

By Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos and Brian Haus

Miami is all about the water and living life outdoors. Walking paths and parks line large stretches of downtown waterfront with a stunning bay view.

This downtown core is where the Army Corps of Engineers plans to build a US$6 billion sea wall, 20 feet high in places, through downtown neighborhoods and right between the Brickell district's high-rises and the bay.

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Lisa-Blue / iStock / Getty Images

Solar energy is most frequently associated with states smack in the middle of the Sun Belt. And yet, there are some notable outliers, with New York being foremost among them. According to data from the Solar Energy Industries Association, New York installed the eighth-most solar of any state in 2020. And in the first quarter of 2021, New York was ranked No. 10 in the nation for solar installations.

There are a number of reasons New York tends to be a top state for solar, not least of which is its excellent solar incentives. However, some cities in New York are more commendable in their solar investment than others. In this article, we'll rank the top 10 top cities for solar in New York.

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Ghost forest panorama in coastal North Carolina. Emily Ury / CC BY-ND

By Emily Ury

Trekking out to my research sites near North Carolina's Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, I slog through knee-deep water on a section of trail that is completely submerged. Permanent flooding has become commonplace on this low-lying peninsula, nestled behind North Carolina's Outer Banks. The trees growing in the water are small and stunted. Many are dead.

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Trending
People on a ferry evacuating as a wildfire approaches the seaside village of Limni, on the island of Evia, Greece, on Aug. 6, 2021. STR / NurPhoto via Getty Images

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is out, and it offers an urgent call to act immediately on the climate crisis.

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The Brooklyn Battery Tunnel is flooded after a tidal surge caused by Hurricane Sandy, on October 30, 2012 in Manhattan, New York. Allison Joyce / Getty Images

Yet another study has confirmed the unprecedented impacts of the climate crisis: Sea levels along the eastern U.S. are rising at their fastest rate in 2,000 years.

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A man walks along the Huntington Beach Pier as the biggest supermoon of 2019 sets on Feb. 19 in Huntington Beach, California. Mark Rightmire / MediaNews Group / Orange County Register via Getty Images

By Brian McNoldy

A "super full moon" is coming on April 27, 2021, and coastal cities like Miami know that means one thing: a heightened risk of tidal flooding.

Read More Show Less
The rapid breakup of glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets have a cascading effect. anyaberkut / Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

The melting of the polar ice caps has often been portrayed as a tsunami-inducing Armageddon in popular culture. In the 2004 disaster movie The Day After Tomorrow, the warming Gulf Stream and North Atlantic currents cause rapid polar melting. The result is a massive wall of ocean water that swamps New York City and beyond, killing millions in the process. And like the recent polar vortex in the Northern Hemisphere, freezing air then rushes in from the poles to spark another ice age.

Read More Show Less
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New study finds worst-case global sea level rise projections will occur unless immediate action is taken. Kazi Salahuddin Razu / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A new study from Australian and Chinese researchers adds weight to scientists' warnings from recent United Nations reports about how sea levels are expected to rise dangerously in the coming decades because of human activity that's driving global heating.

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Recent research suggests that some nuclear waste storage facilities along the U.S. coast could experience flooding from rising seas. Art Wager / Getty Images

Nuclear power is a source of low-carbon electricity, but producing it creates dangerous radioactive waste that needs to be stored safely and permanently.

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Trending
Pexels

By Jessica Corbett

A new study is shedding light on just how much ice could be lost around Antarctica if the international community fails to urgently rein in planet-heating emissions, bolstering arguments for bolder climate policies.

The study, published Thursday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, found that over a third of the area of all Antarctic ice shelves — including 67% of area on the Antarctic Peninsula — could be at risk of collapsing if global temperatures soar to 4°C above pre-industrial levels.

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A crack in the Pine Island Glacier. NASA's Earth Observatory / CC BY 2.0

The Pine Island Glacier is currently Antarctica's greatest contributor to sea level rise, and, now, a new study warns that it could be closer to collapse than previously thought.

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People enjoy a warm afternoon beside the artistic installation "Ghost Forest", by artist and architect Maya Lin, in Madison Square Park on May 13, 2021 in New York City. Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Maya Lin, the designer of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C., created a "Ghost Forest" art exhibit to bring awareness to the dangers of climate change and its impact on trees.

The exhibit, located in downtown Manhattan, features 49 lifeless Atlantic Cedar trees that have been replanted into the ground. The trees were sourced from the Pinelands in New Jersey. "Ghost Forest" premiered on May 10 and will be open until Nov. 14.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Italy Bans Large Cruise Ships From Venice

The restriction will come into effect at the beginning of August, the Italian government has confirmed. Campaigners say the liners cause damage to Venice's ecosystem.

Popular
MSC Magnifica is seen from one of the canals leading into the Venice Lagoon on June 9, 2019 in Venice. Miguel MEDINA / AFP / Getty Images

Large cruise ships will be banned from entering the Venice lagoon as of August 1, the Italian government announced Tuesday.

It follows years of warnings they risk causing irreparable damage to Venice's ecosystem.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Miami and Miami Beach were built right up to the waterfront, with little room for nature. Shobeir Ansari / Getty Images

By Landolf Rhode-Barbarigos and Brian Haus

Miami is all about the water and living life outdoors. Walking paths and parks line large stretches of downtown waterfront with a stunning bay view.

This downtown core is where the Army Corps of Engineers plans to build a US$6 billion sea wall, 20 feet high in places, through downtown neighborhoods and right between the Brickell district's high-rises and the bay.

Read More Show Less
Lisa-Blue / iStock / Getty Images

Solar energy is most frequently associated with states smack in the middle of the Sun Belt. And yet, there are some notable outliers, with New York being foremost among them. According to data from the Solar Energy Industries Association, New York installed the eighth-most solar of any state in 2020. And in the first quarter of 2021, New York was ranked No. 10 in the nation for solar installations.

There are a number of reasons New York tends to be a top state for solar, not least of which is its excellent solar incentives. However, some cities in New York are more commendable in their solar investment than others. In this article, we'll rank the top 10 top cities for solar in New York.

Read More Show Less
Ghost forest panorama in coastal North Carolina. Emily Ury / CC BY-ND

By Emily Ury

Trekking out to my research sites near North Carolina's Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, I slog through knee-deep water on a section of trail that is completely submerged. Permanent flooding has become commonplace on this low-lying peninsula, nestled behind North Carolina's Outer Banks. The trees growing in the water are small and stunted. Many are dead.

Read More Show Less
Trending
People on a ferry evacuating as a wildfire approaches the seaside village of Limni, on the island of Evia, Greece, on Aug. 6, 2021. STR / NurPhoto via Getty Images

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is out, and it offers an urgent call to act immediately on the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The Brooklyn Battery Tunnel is flooded after a tidal surge caused by Hurricane Sandy, on October 30, 2012 in Manhattan, New York. Allison Joyce / Getty Images

Yet another study has confirmed the unprecedented impacts of the climate crisis: Sea levels along the eastern U.S. are rising at their fastest rate in 2,000 years.

Read More Show Less
A man walks along the Huntington Beach Pier as the biggest supermoon of 2019 sets on Feb. 19 in Huntington Beach, California. Mark Rightmire / MediaNews Group / Orange County Register via Getty Images

By Brian McNoldy

A "super full moon" is coming on April 27, 2021, and coastal cities like Miami know that means one thing: a heightened risk of tidal flooding.

Read More Show Less
The rapid breakup of glaciers, ice caps and ice sheets have a cascading effect. anyaberkut / Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

The melting of the polar ice caps has often been portrayed as a tsunami-inducing Armageddon in popular culture. In the 2004 disaster movie The Day After Tomorrow, the warming Gulf Stream and North Atlantic currents cause rapid polar melting. The result is a massive wall of ocean water that swamps New York City and beyond, killing millions in the process. And like the recent polar vortex in the Northern Hemisphere, freezing air then rushes in from the poles to spark another ice age.