Quantcast
EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A crack in the Pine Island Glacier. NASA's Earth Observatory / CC BY 2.0

The Pine Island Glacier is currently Antarctica's greatest contributor to sea level rise, and, now, a new study warns that it could be closer to collapse than previously thought.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The world's largest has calved from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. European Space Agency

A massive chunk of ice broke off of Antarctica this month, and it is now the largest iceberg in the world.

Read More Show Less
Madeleine_Steinbach / iStock / Getty Images

Krill oil has gained a lot of popularity recently as a superior alternative to fish oil. Basically, the claim goes, anything fish oil can do, krill oil does better. Read on to learn what makes krill oil supplements better than fish oil supplements, why you should consider these vitamin supplements, and which brands we recommend.

Read More Show Less
Icebergs near Ilulissat, Greenland on Oct. 7, 2020. Ulrik Pedersen / NurPhoto via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Researchers warned of the need for urgent climate action as a study published Wednesday revealed that the world's mountain glaciers are melting at an unprecedented pace, with glacial thinning rates outside Antarctica and Greenland doubling this century.

Read More Show Less
Trending
An aerial view from a drone shows a street inundated with flood water on Dec. 23, 2019 in Hallandale, Florida. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Djinis

Florida has long been known as an environmental contradiction. It's mostly a peninsula at risk from the severe impacts of climate change, including rising seas, warming temperatures, and worsening extreme-weather events; yet it's also a state governed by Republican leaders who have refused to even publicly utter the words "climate change."

Read More Show Less
German climate activist from the Fridays for Future movement Luisa Neubauer, Swedish founder of the School Strike for Climate movement Greta Thunberg, and climate activists from Belgium Adelaide Charlier and Anuna de Wever cross a footbridge from Berlin's main railway station towards a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Aug. 20, 2020. TODD ANDERSEN / AFP via Getty Images

Germany's highest court ruled Thursday that the country's 2019 climate law unconstitutionally saddles young people with the burden of fighting climate change by "irreversibly offload[ing] major emission reductions burdens onto periods after 2030."

Read More Show Less
The National Weather Service station in Chatham, Massachusetts, near the edge of a cliff at the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge. Bryce Williams / National Weather Service in Boston / Norton

A weather research station on a bluff overlooking the sea is closing down because of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The western edge of the Greenland ice sheet in West Greenland as seen from the air. Ashley Cooper / Getty Images

As the world's ice sheets melt at an increasing rate, researchers are looking for explanations beyond just a hotter climate. A recent study found one answer may lie in the dust.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Melting ice forms a lake on free-floating ice jammed into the Ilulissat Icefjord during unseasonably warm weather on July 30, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A first-of-its-kind study has examined the satellite record to see how the climate crisis is impacting all of the planet's ice.

Read More Show Less
An airplane view shows a lake of meltwater in the Greenland ice sheet on August 04, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A new study of Greenland's glacial rivers has important implications for how scientists might model future ice melt and subsequent sea level rise.

Read More Show Less
Trending
A large, long-running crack is visible across the Pine Island Glacier on Oct. 14, 2011. NASA ICE / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 2.0

Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier is currently losing more ice than any other glacier in Antarctica, but could it collapse entirely?

Read More Show Less
A woman is seen collecting drinking water in Satkhira, Bangladesh on March 20, 2021. Kazi Salahuddin Razu / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Sam Baker

What really makes this reporter's stomach churn thinking about climate change? Thawing permafrost. A scenario where it all melts, releasing copious amounts of CO2 and methane (it holds twice as much carbon as the atmosphere holds right now), and there's no going back.

Read More Show Less
Remnants of ancient Greenland tundra were preserved in soil beneath the ice sheet. Andrew Christ and Dorothy Peteet / CC BY-ND

By Andrew Christ and Paul Bierman

In 1963, inside a covert U.S. military base in northern Greenland, a team of scientists began drilling down through the Greenland ice sheet. Piece by piece, they extracted an ice core 4 inches across and nearly a mile long. At the very end, they pulled up something else – 12 feet of frozen soil.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A crack in the Pine Island Glacier. NASA's Earth Observatory / CC BY 2.0

The Pine Island Glacier is currently Antarctica's greatest contributor to sea level rise, and, now, a new study warns that it could be closer to collapse than previously thought.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The world's largest has calved from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. European Space Agency

A massive chunk of ice broke off of Antarctica this month, and it is now the largest iceberg in the world.

Read More Show Less
Madeleine_Steinbach / iStock / Getty Images

Krill oil has gained a lot of popularity recently as a superior alternative to fish oil. Basically, the claim goes, anything fish oil can do, krill oil does better. Read on to learn what makes krill oil supplements better than fish oil supplements, why you should consider these vitamin supplements, and which brands we recommend.

Read More Show Less
Icebergs near Ilulissat, Greenland on Oct. 7, 2020. Ulrik Pedersen / NurPhoto via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Researchers warned of the need for urgent climate action as a study published Wednesday revealed that the world's mountain glaciers are melting at an unprecedented pace, with glacial thinning rates outside Antarctica and Greenland doubling this century.

Read More Show Less
Trending
An aerial view from a drone shows a street inundated with flood water on Dec. 23, 2019 in Hallandale, Florida. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Djinis

Florida has long been known as an environmental contradiction. It's mostly a peninsula at risk from the severe impacts of climate change, including rising seas, warming temperatures, and worsening extreme-weather events; yet it's also a state governed by Republican leaders who have refused to even publicly utter the words "climate change."

Read More Show Less
German climate activist from the Fridays for Future movement Luisa Neubauer, Swedish founder of the School Strike for Climate movement Greta Thunberg, and climate activists from Belgium Adelaide Charlier and Anuna de Wever cross a footbridge from Berlin's main railway station towards a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Aug. 20, 2020. TODD ANDERSEN / AFP via Getty Images

Germany's highest court ruled Thursday that the country's 2019 climate law unconstitutionally saddles young people with the burden of fighting climate change by "irreversibly offload[ing] major emission reductions burdens onto periods after 2030."

Read More Show Less
The National Weather Service station in Chatham, Massachusetts, near the edge of a cliff at the Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge. Bryce Williams / National Weather Service in Boston / Norton

A weather research station on a bluff overlooking the sea is closing down because of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
The western edge of the Greenland ice sheet in West Greenland as seen from the air. Ashley Cooper / Getty Images

As the world's ice sheets melt at an increasing rate, researchers are looking for explanations beyond just a hotter climate. A recent study found one answer may lie in the dust.

Read More Show Less
Trending