Quantcast
EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A New Yorker attempts to wade through a flooded subway station in Manhattan on July 8, 2021. @PaulleeWR / Twitter Screengrab

By Jake Johnson

Footage of New Yorkers struggling to wade through filthy, waist-deep water at a Manhattan subway station as heavy rainfall engulfed the city's aging and long-neglected infrastructure on Thursday added fuel to progressive demands for a robust federal spending package that confronts the climate crisis — which is making such extreme weather more frequent and destructive.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
An orca whale in Elliott Bay and the Seattle, Washington, skyline. Joel Rogers / Corbis Documentary / Getty Images

The massive heat wave forecast to oppress the Pacific Northwest this weekend will be extreme and historic, among other superlatives, a growing consensus among meteorologists warns.

Read More Show Less
qingwa / iStock / Getty Images

Whether you're installing a DIY solar panel system or having a top solar company handle the details, you'll want to choose the best solar panels for your home. But with so many options, it can be hard to know which panels you need.

In this article, we'll narrow down the 10 best residential solar panels based on materials, price, efficiency and more. All homes are different, so there's no one best solar panel for every system. It's important for homeowners to assess their specific needs and to select the right solar panels to accommodate their household energy requirements.

Read More Show Less
People walk in the flooded road after record downpours in Zhengzhou city in central China's Henan province on, July 20, 2021. Feature China / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

More than two dozen people have been killed by catastrophic flash flooding in central China in recent days.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Burnt hills, flames and smoke surround a drought-stricken Shasta Lake during the Salt Fire in Lakehead, California on July 1, 2021. JOSH EDELSON / AFP via Getty Images

The West Coast of the U.S. continues to bake as high temperatures fuel wildfires.

Read More Show Less
A sign at Hoover Dam warns of "very dangerous levels" of heat in the forecast at Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada on July 1, 2021. David McNew / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

It's hard not to think about how hot it's been — even if you live somewhere that has escaped the heat in the past few weeks. When British Columbia clocks temperatures of 121° F, it gets the world's attention. As it should.

Here are six reasons why we need to be paying more attention to heat waves.

Read More Show Less
NOAA's HRRR Smoke Model as of July 16, 2021 at 5 p.m. NOAA

There are currently 70 wildfires burning more than one million acres across the U.S., according to the most recent figures from the National Interagency Fire Center.

While the bulk of the fires themselves are burning in the West, the smoke is projected to fill skies across the entire country, reaching as far east as New York.

Read More Show Less
The thermometer at Calvary Church in Woodland Hills, California registers 117 degrees Fahrenheit on Aug. 19, 2020 during a second week of excessive heat and elevated fire danger. Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

The traditional end of summer weekend will feel more like mid-July in the West.

Read More Show Less
Trending
The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite measures sea surface height and other ocean surface features such as wind speed and wave height. Red-orange areas show regions where sea level was higher than normal, and blue areas show regions where it was lower than normal, on June 9, 2021. NASA Earth Observatory

Thousands of scientists reiterated calls for immediate action over the climate crisis in an article published Wednesday in the journal BioScience.

Read More Show Less
A brush fire encroaches along Japatul Road as a helicopter drops water during the Valley Fire in Jamul, California on Sept. 6, 2020. SANDY HUFFAKER / AFP via Getty Images

On a Labor Day weekend when the temperature hit 121 degrees in Los Angeles County, fire crews around California struggled to contain ongoing and growing blazes that have so far consumed more than 2 million acres this summer. That's equal to the entire state of Delaware going up in flames, according to the BBC.

The record heat coupled with dry and windy conditions is making the 22 fires in the state difficult for crews to contain. In a preventive measure, the state's power authority shut off electricity to 172,000 homes and businesses in 22 counties in Northern California. The power will not be fully restored until Wednesday evening, according to CNN.

The small mountain town of Big Creek in the Sierra Nevada mountain range saw trapped campers airlifted to safety while the fire burned through the town, destroying roughly two dozen homes, according to NBC News.

While a hydroelectric plant owned by Southern California Edison was destroyed, three propane tanks with 11,000 gallons of the flammable gas exploded and an elementary school caught fire.

The school's superintendent, Toby Wait, evacuated with his family, but his home was destroyed after they fled.

"Words cannot even begin to describe the devastation of this community," he said to The Fresno Bee, as NBC News reported.

The fire started on Friday and grew to burn nearly 80,000 acres Monday, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. It is zero percent contained.

"This one's in a class by itself," said U.S. Forest Service Supervisor Dean Gould during a Monday night press briefing, as CNN reported.

Farther south, Los Angeles and Ventura county are under a red flag warning as the cooling temperatures after the weekend's record heat are expected to usher in high winds, which may fan the flames of ongoing fires.

The state's fire authorities are currently battling 24 fires across the state, according to the BBC.

While the red flag warning in Los Angeles and Ventura counties is expected to last through Wednesday, the state will also see wind gusts of up to 50 mph in Northern California. Those high winds are particularly dangerous as they pose the threat of spreading flames over the dry vegetation that is parched after the weekend's heat, according to PG&E senior meteorologist Scott Strenfel, as CNN reported.

"Unfortunately, this wind event is occurring on the heels of the current heat wave and will produce critical fire potential conditions," Strenfel said, as CNN reported.

"Windy conditions, like those being forecast, increase the potential for damage and hazards to the electric infrastructure, which could cause sparks if lines are energized. These conditions also increase the potential for rapid fire spread," PG&E said in a news release on Monday.

All campgrounds across the state have been canceled in a season that has seen a record number of campers. The U.S. Forest Service said the following in a press release: "Most of California remains under the threat of unprecedented and dangerous fire conditions with a combination of extreme heat, significant wind events, dry conditions, and firefighting resources that are stretched to the limit."

According to the BBC, the Valley Fire in San Diego County has burned more than 10,000 acres near the small town of Alpine. In Angeles National Forest, the Bobcat fire has burned through nearly 5,000 acres and prompted the evacuation of the Mount Wilson Observatory.

Trending
Families purchase fireworks five days prior to the 4th of July at a fireworks stand on Monday, June 29, 2020 in Hawthorne, California. Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

Record heat and extreme drought have caused several cities in southwest Washington, Oregon and California to ban fireworks this Fourth of July, citing wildfire concerns.

Due to the extreme conditions, lighting fireworks at home could create a tinderbox-like situation, according to The Guardian.

Read More Show Less
The downtown skyline behind high tension towers from the East 4th Street bridge in Los Angeles, California on Aug. 16, 2020. California ordered rolling power outages for the first time since 2001 as a statewide heat wave strained its electrical system. APU GOMES / AFP via Getty Images

While California has several microclimates that make the temperatures and weather patterns in various parts of the state wildly different from each other, few areas were left unaffected by the extreme heat that has blanketed the state.

Read More Show Less
The unprecedented and concurrent extreme conditions resemble the chaotic climate future scientists have been warning us about for decades. Master Sgt. Christopher DeWitt / U.S. Air Force / DoD / NASA

By Jeff Berardelli

From the historic heat wave and wildfires in the West, to the massive derecho that tore through the middle of the nation, to the record-breaking pace of this year's hurricane season, the unprecedented and concurrent extreme conditions resemble the chaotic climate future scientists have been warning us about for decades — only it's happening right now.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A New Yorker attempts to wade through a flooded subway station in Manhattan on July 8, 2021. @PaulleeWR / Twitter Screengrab

By Jake Johnson

Footage of New Yorkers struggling to wade through filthy, waist-deep water at a Manhattan subway station as heavy rainfall engulfed the city's aging and long-neglected infrastructure on Thursday added fuel to progressive demands for a robust federal spending package that confronts the climate crisis — which is making such extreme weather more frequent and destructive.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
An orca whale in Elliott Bay and the Seattle, Washington, skyline. Joel Rogers / Corbis Documentary / Getty Images

The massive heat wave forecast to oppress the Pacific Northwest this weekend will be extreme and historic, among other superlatives, a growing consensus among meteorologists warns.

Read More Show Less
qingwa / iStock / Getty Images

Whether you're installing a DIY solar panel system or having a top solar company handle the details, you'll want to choose the best solar panels for your home. But with so many options, it can be hard to know which panels you need.

In this article, we'll narrow down the 10 best residential solar panels based on materials, price, efficiency and more. All homes are different, so there's no one best solar panel for every system. It's important for homeowners to assess their specific needs and to select the right solar panels to accommodate their household energy requirements.

Read More Show Less
People walk in the flooded road after record downpours in Zhengzhou city in central China's Henan province on, July 20, 2021. Feature China / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

More than two dozen people have been killed by catastrophic flash flooding in central China in recent days.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Burnt hills, flames and smoke surround a drought-stricken Shasta Lake during the Salt Fire in Lakehead, California on July 1, 2021. JOSH EDELSON / AFP via Getty Images

The West Coast of the U.S. continues to bake as high temperatures fuel wildfires.

Read More Show Less
A sign at Hoover Dam warns of "very dangerous levels" of heat in the forecast at Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada on July 1, 2021. David McNew / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

It's hard not to think about how hot it's been — even if you live somewhere that has escaped the heat in the past few weeks. When British Columbia clocks temperatures of 121° F, it gets the world's attention. As it should.

Here are six reasons why we need to be paying more attention to heat waves.

Read More Show Less
NOAA's HRRR Smoke Model as of July 16, 2021 at 5 p.m. NOAA

There are currently 70 wildfires burning more than one million acres across the U.S., according to the most recent figures from the National Interagency Fire Center.

While the bulk of the fires themselves are burning in the West, the smoke is projected to fill skies across the entire country, reaching as far east as New York.

Read More Show Less
The thermometer at Calvary Church in Woodland Hills, California registers 117 degrees Fahrenheit on Aug. 19, 2020 during a second week of excessive heat and elevated fire danger. Al Seib / Los Angeles Times

The traditional end of summer weekend will feel more like mid-July in the West.

Read More Show Less
Trending