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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A drone flies over Seymour Norte in the Galapagos Islands, dropping off rodenticide to kill invasive rats. Island Conservation

In the Galapagos Islands, many of Darwin's beloved animal species are getting a helping hand in the fight against invasive rats. Drones deployed over two years ago have finally eradicated all rodents on the Seymour Norte and Mosquera Islands.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A Malayan porcupine photographed at Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand. Jason Thompson / CC BY 2.0

By John R. Platt

A porcupine's diet is wide, varied, and a little hard to digest. A lifetime of grasses, herbs, bark and other vegetation can leave little bits of indigestible matter behind in a porcupine's digestive tract, where they occasionally congeal into a hard ball called a bezoar.

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imaginima / E+ / Getty Images

Interested in making the switch to solar energy, but not sure how solar panels work? Understanding household renewable energy systems can make it easier to find the best solar panels for your home.

Many homeowners are going solar to help lessen dependence on traditional utility companies and slash monthly electric bills. In addition to these cost savings, switching to a home solar system means minimizing your environmental footprint. Between the financial advantages and the improved ecological stewardship, solar energy can seem like a no-brainer.

Let's dive into the science behind solar and how solar panels work to power homes.

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Chef Daniel Humm at Eleven Madison Park Restaurant. Sebastian Nevols

One of the world's best restaurants is giving up meat.

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Trending
The Peruvian coast guard and special prosecutors prepare to board the Don Santos after observing its illegal fishing activities from Sea Shepherd's Ocean Warrior. Sea Shepherd

In June, the first missions of a successful joint operation between specialized environmental prosecutors of the government of Peru and Sea Shepherd Conservation Society encountered and apprehended multiple illegal fishing vessels in Peruvian waters.

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Deer at the Warner Wetlands in Oregon on Feb. 22, 2017. Greg Shine, BLM / Flickr, CC BY 4.0

By Jeremy Dertien, Courtney Larson and Sarah Reed

Millions of Americans are traveling this summer as pandemic restrictions wind down. Rental bookings and crowds in national parks show that many people are headed for the great outdoors.

Seeing animals and birds is one of the main draws of spending time in nature. But as researchers who study conservation, wildlife and human impacts on wild places, we believe it's important to know that you can have major effects on wildlife just by being nearby.

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A black rhino in Addo Elephant National Park, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Mikael Drackner / Moment / Getty Images

By Richard Thomas

Joseph Biden was elected to office as the world continues to struggle with a global pandemic that has killed more than a million people and wreaked devastating economic havoc. The pandemic has highlighted how humankind's abuse of our planet and the irreversible loss of the biodiversity and ecosystem services upon which we all rely for our very existence simply can't go on.

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An African savanna elephant in Botswana. Charles J. Sharp / CC BY-SA 3.0

Africa's elephants are in trouble, and human activity is to blame.

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Trending
Two vaquitas surfacing for air in the Sea of Cortez. NOAA

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

The Mexican government will no longer protect the habitat of the critically endangered vaquita in the Upper Gulf of California, but has opened the area up to fishing, according to a news report.
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A family of Asian small-clawed otters sit on a log. Tom Meaker / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Muntasir Akash

The smallest of the planet's 13 otter species finds its habitat shrinking every day. We know little about these mustelids — especially in Bangladesh, where I conduct my research — but they face a horde of threats.

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Trending
Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation safely returned 10 rescued orangutans to the wild on Borneo Island, Indonesia. Afriadi Hikmal / Getty Images

With lockdowns in place and budgets slashed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many environmental protections vanished this past year, leaving some of the world's most vulnerable species and habitats at risk. But conservationists at the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation were faced with an entirely different threat.

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Large-antlered muntjac resemble many other deer, except males have long, sharp canine teeth used for fighting. The species is critically endangered. Michael Nosek / Getty Images

By Minh Minh Nguyen

First recognized as a new species in 1993, the large-antlered muntjac is already critically endangered and heading fast toward extinction. As muntjac go, the large-antlered is the largest species, but muntjac in general are small members of the deer family Cervidae. The species is facing a "quiet extinction," hidden away in a miniscule global range in the Annamite Mountains of Laos and Vietnam.

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A grizzly bear searches for salmon. Scott Suriano / Moment / Getty Images

A flurry of bills has recently been introduced to Montana's state legislature that reduces restrictions on the killing of grizzly bears and wolves — two predators which have historically struggled to survive in the state.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A drone flies over Seymour Norte in the Galapagos Islands, dropping off rodenticide to kill invasive rats. Island Conservation

In the Galapagos Islands, many of Darwin's beloved animal species are getting a helping hand in the fight against invasive rats. Drones deployed over two years ago have finally eradicated all rodents on the Seymour Norte and Mosquera Islands.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A Malayan porcupine photographed at Kaeng Krachan National Park, Phetchaburi, Thailand. Jason Thompson / CC BY 2.0

By John R. Platt

A porcupine's diet is wide, varied, and a little hard to digest. A lifetime of grasses, herbs, bark and other vegetation can leave little bits of indigestible matter behind in a porcupine's digestive tract, where they occasionally congeal into a hard ball called a bezoar.

Read More Show Less
imaginima / E+ / Getty Images

Interested in making the switch to solar energy, but not sure how solar panels work? Understanding household renewable energy systems can make it easier to find the best solar panels for your home.

Many homeowners are going solar to help lessen dependence on traditional utility companies and slash monthly electric bills. In addition to these cost savings, switching to a home solar system means minimizing your environmental footprint. Between the financial advantages and the improved ecological stewardship, solar energy can seem like a no-brainer.

Let's dive into the science behind solar and how solar panels work to power homes.

Read More Show Less
Chef Daniel Humm at Eleven Madison Park Restaurant. Sebastian Nevols

One of the world's best restaurants is giving up meat.

Read More Show Less
Trending
The Peruvian coast guard and special prosecutors prepare to board the Don Santos after observing its illegal fishing activities from Sea Shepherd's Ocean Warrior. Sea Shepherd

In June, the first missions of a successful joint operation between specialized environmental prosecutors of the government of Peru and Sea Shepherd Conservation Society encountered and apprehended multiple illegal fishing vessels in Peruvian waters.

Read More Show Less
Deer at the Warner Wetlands in Oregon on Feb. 22, 2017. Greg Shine, BLM / Flickr, CC BY 4.0

By Jeremy Dertien, Courtney Larson and Sarah Reed

Millions of Americans are traveling this summer as pandemic restrictions wind down. Rental bookings and crowds in national parks show that many people are headed for the great outdoors.

Seeing animals and birds is one of the main draws of spending time in nature. But as researchers who study conservation, wildlife and human impacts on wild places, we believe it's important to know that you can have major effects on wildlife just by being nearby.

Read More Show Less
A black rhino in Addo Elephant National Park, Eastern Cape, South Africa. Mikael Drackner / Moment / Getty Images

By Richard Thomas

Joseph Biden was elected to office as the world continues to struggle with a global pandemic that has killed more than a million people and wreaked devastating economic havoc. The pandemic has highlighted how humankind's abuse of our planet and the irreversible loss of the biodiversity and ecosystem services upon which we all rely for our very existence simply can't go on.

Read More Show Less
An African savanna elephant in Botswana. Charles J. Sharp / CC BY-SA 3.0

Africa's elephants are in trouble, and human activity is to blame.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Two vaquitas surfacing for air in the Sea of Cortez. NOAA

By Elizabeth Claire Alberts

The Mexican government will no longer protect the habitat of the critically endangered vaquita in the Upper Gulf of California, but has opened the area up to fishing, according to a news report.
Read More Show Less
A family of Asian small-clawed otters sit on a log. Tom Meaker / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Muntasir Akash

The smallest of the planet's 13 otter species finds its habitat shrinking every day. We know little about these mustelids — especially in Bangladesh, where I conduct my research — but they face a horde of threats.

Read More Show Less