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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Cool Walks

Barcelonians can now use a new app designed to show pedestrians the shadiest routes to take to avoid extreme heat.

The app, Cool Walks, a navigation and routing tool for pedestrians, was first developed at a data visualization contest.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter


The Sun shines through a tree in a valley near the Russian city of Krasnoyarsk in Siberia. A recent study attributed the severity of the heat wave that swept across Siberia in 2020 to human activity. nikita velikanin / Unsplash

By Michael Allen

Last year was hot. NASA declared that it tied 2016 for the hottest year on record, and the Met Office of the United Kingdom said it was the final year in the warmest 10-year period ever recorded. Temperatures were particularly high in Siberia, with some areas experiencing monthly averages more than 10°C above the 1981–2010 average. Overall, Siberia had the warmest January to June since records began; on 20 June, the town of Verkhoyansk, Russia, hit 38°C, the highest temperature ever recorded in the Arctic Circle.

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Up Your Skincare Game: 6 Best Vitamin C Serums

Medically reviewed by Anna H. Chacon, M.D.

Reviews
fizkes / iStock / Getty Images

From eating foods for healthy skin to switching up your morning and routines, taking care of the largest organ in the body can get overwhelming. Recently, vitamin C has grown in popularity in the skincare world — but do the best vitamin C serums live up to the hype?

Vitamin C is not only an essential supplement for your immune system and overall health, but it's also a great skincare ingredient that can help limit inflammation, brighten skin, dull fine lines and wrinkles, fight free radicals, and reduce discoloration and dark spots.

Adding vitamin C to your skincare routine seems like a no-brainer, but before you start shopping for a serum, it's important to be aware that vitamin C is an unstable ingredient. Dermatologists say it's important to find legit and properly formulated vitamin C serums to capitalize on the benefits of the antioxidant. In this article, we'll help you find the right dermatologist-approved vitamin C serum to add to your routine.

Read More Show Less
The sun sets behind power lines in Los Angeles, California on Sept. 3, 2020, ahead of a heat wave. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Mutually worsening heat and drought, both fueled by climate change, are stifling the American West, stoking wildfire fears and straining electrical grids — and the worst is far from over.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Municipal vehicles sprinkle water in downtown Moscow during a midday 33 Celsius heat, on July 14, 2021. Alexander Nemenov / AFP via Getty Images

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the US said on Friday that July 2021 was the hottest month ever recorded globally.

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A solar array in Ft. Worth, Texas. Dave Matthews / Contributor / Getty Images

The Texas power grid is expected to see its highest power demand of 2021 this week with extreme heat expected there and across the country.

Read More Show Less
Svetlana Gomboeva of Team ROC is treated for heat exhaustion during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Yumenoshima Park Archery Field on July 23, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. Justin Setterfield / Getty Images

The 2020 Summer Olympics kicked off in Tokyo on Friday and there are already signs the toughest part of the competition may just be the extreme heat and humidity in what is expected to be the hottest Olympics on record.

Read More Show Less
People wait outside an emergency room following a heat wave in Pakistan. Asianet-Pakistan / Barcroft Indi via Getty Images

As this summer's extreme heat waves and floods have made devastatingly clear, the climate crisis is already deadly. And it is likely to get even deadlier if nothing is done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Extinction Rebellion protesters join the March for Nature on Sept. 4, 2021 in London, England. Rob Pinney / Getty Images

By Lorena Gonzalez and Nate Shelter

World leaders are gathering in New York this week and next for the UN General Assembly meeting (UNGA76) and Climate Week. The two major events come at a critical moment for climate action.

Read More Show Less
Here’s What Climate Change Will Mean for Bats

A new study identifies threats facing dozens of bat species in areas of the world that are predicted to get hotter and drier.

Animals
Mexican free-tailed bats. USFWS / Ann Froschauer

By Tara Lohan

The Isabelline Serotine bat (Eptesicus isabellinus) ranges across areas north of the Sahara and into the southern portion of the Iberian Peninsula. But it may be time for the species to start packing its bags.

A new study in Global Ecology and Conservation found that dozens of bat species living in parts of the world predicted to get hotter and drier with climate change will need to shift their ranges to find suitable habitat. For Isabelline Serotine bats that could mean a big move — more than 1,000 miles, the researchers determined.

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Trending
Crosses left by border activists mark the locations where the remains of migrants who died trying to cross into the United States were discovered in the Altar Valley, Arizona. The advocacy group Humane Borders reported on Tuesday that the bodies of 43 migrants were found in the Arizona desert last month. Andrew Lichtenstein / Corbis / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

The Tucson, Arizona-based non-profit group Humane Borders said Tuesday that amid the Southwest's extreme heatwave last month, an unusually large number of migrants' human remains were found in the desert near the U.S.-Mexico border.

The group, which maps the recovery of human remains using data from the Pima County medical examiner and operates stations scattered throughout the borderlands where migrants can access water, said its volunteers counted 43 human bodies in June.

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A humpback whale, one of the species affected by the Pacific marine heat wave, breaches in Kenai Fjords National Park in the Gulf of Alaska. Kaitlin Thoreson / National Park Service

By Hannah Thomasy

From 2014 to 2016, the Gulf of Alaska experienced the worst marine heat wave of the decade. From single-celled organisms to top predators, practically no level of the ecosystem was left unscathed. During the Pacific marine heat wave, tens of thousands of dead seabirds washed up on beaches, unusually low numbers of humpback whales arrived in their summer habitats, and toxic algal blooms spread along the West Coast of North America.

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People on a ferry evacuating as a wildfire approaches the seaside village of Limni, on the island of Evia, Greece, on Aug. 6, 2021. STR / NurPhoto via Getty Images

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is out, and it offers an urgent call to act immediately on the climate crisis.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Cool Walks

Barcelonians can now use a new app designed to show pedestrians the shadiest routes to take to avoid extreme heat.

The app, Cool Walks, a navigation and routing tool for pedestrians, was first developed at a data visualization contest.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter


The Sun shines through a tree in a valley near the Russian city of Krasnoyarsk in Siberia. A recent study attributed the severity of the heat wave that swept across Siberia in 2020 to human activity. nikita velikanin / Unsplash

By Michael Allen

Last year was hot. NASA declared that it tied 2016 for the hottest year on record, and the Met Office of the United Kingdom said it was the final year in the warmest 10-year period ever recorded. Temperatures were particularly high in Siberia, with some areas experiencing monthly averages more than 10°C above the 1981–2010 average. Overall, Siberia had the warmest January to June since records began; on 20 June, the town of Verkhoyansk, Russia, hit 38°C, the highest temperature ever recorded in the Arctic Circle.

Read More Show Less
Up Your Skincare Game: 6 Best Vitamin C Serums

Medically reviewed by Anna H. Chacon, M.D.

Reviews
fizkes / iStock / Getty Images

From eating foods for healthy skin to switching up your morning and routines, taking care of the largest organ in the body can get overwhelming. Recently, vitamin C has grown in popularity in the skincare world — but do the best vitamin C serums live up to the hype?

Vitamin C is not only an essential supplement for your immune system and overall health, but it's also a great skincare ingredient that can help limit inflammation, brighten skin, dull fine lines and wrinkles, fight free radicals, and reduce discoloration and dark spots.

Adding vitamin C to your skincare routine seems like a no-brainer, but before you start shopping for a serum, it's important to be aware that vitamin C is an unstable ingredient. Dermatologists say it's important to find legit and properly formulated vitamin C serums to capitalize on the benefits of the antioxidant. In this article, we'll help you find the right dermatologist-approved vitamin C serum to add to your routine.

Read More Show Less
The sun sets behind power lines in Los Angeles, California on Sept. 3, 2020, ahead of a heat wave. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Mutually worsening heat and drought, both fueled by climate change, are stifling the American West, stoking wildfire fears and straining electrical grids — and the worst is far from over.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Municipal vehicles sprinkle water in downtown Moscow during a midday 33 Celsius heat, on July 14, 2021. Alexander Nemenov / AFP via Getty Images

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the US said on Friday that July 2021 was the hottest month ever recorded globally.

Read More Show Less
A solar array in Ft. Worth, Texas. Dave Matthews / Contributor / Getty Images

The Texas power grid is expected to see its highest power demand of 2021 this week with extreme heat expected there and across the country.

Read More Show Less
Svetlana Gomboeva of Team ROC is treated for heat exhaustion during the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games at Yumenoshima Park Archery Field on July 23, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan. Justin Setterfield / Getty Images

The 2020 Summer Olympics kicked off in Tokyo on Friday and there are already signs the toughest part of the competition may just be the extreme heat and humidity in what is expected to be the hottest Olympics on record.

Read More Show Less
People wait outside an emergency room following a heat wave in Pakistan. Asianet-Pakistan / Barcroft Indi via Getty Images

As this summer's extreme heat waves and floods have made devastatingly clear, the climate crisis is already deadly. And it is likely to get even deadlier if nothing is done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Extinction Rebellion protesters join the March for Nature on Sept. 4, 2021 in London, England. Rob Pinney / Getty Images

By Lorena Gonzalez and Nate Shelter

World leaders are gathering in New York this week and next for the UN General Assembly meeting (UNGA76) and Climate Week. The two major events come at a critical moment for climate action.

Read More Show Less
Here’s What Climate Change Will Mean for Bats

A new study identifies threats facing dozens of bat species in areas of the world that are predicted to get hotter and drier.

Animals
Mexican free-tailed bats. USFWS / Ann Froschauer

By Tara Lohan

The Isabelline Serotine bat (Eptesicus isabellinus) ranges across areas north of the Sahara and into the southern portion of the Iberian Peninsula. But it may be time for the species to start packing its bags.

A new study in Global Ecology and Conservation found that dozens of bat species living in parts of the world predicted to get hotter and drier with climate change will need to shift their ranges to find suitable habitat. For Isabelline Serotine bats that could mean a big move — more than 1,000 miles, the researchers determined.