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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Sea Turtle Hospital at Whitney / Instagram

By David Duffy and Catherine Eastman

Plastic pollution has been found in practically every environment on the planet, with especially severe effects on ocean life. Plastic waste harms marine life in many ways – most notably, when animals become entangled in it or consume it.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A large loggerhead with other injuries washed ashore during the latest cold-stunning event and was treated at New England Aquarium. New England Aquarium

Hundreds of endangered sea turtles were stranded on beaches after suffering "cold stunning" in the waters off Cape Cod, Mass. Local rescuers and wildlife rehabilitators stabilized the turtles at the New England Aquarium (NEAQ) and National Marine Life Center and began treatment. Many of the sea turtles were transported by land or air to partner facilities around the Eastern Seaboard for longer-term care to make room for more incoming, cold-stunned animals.

Read More Show Less
Patrick Fraser / DigitalVision / Getty Images

Throughout Texas, there are a number of solar power companies that can install solar panels on your roof to take advantage of the abundant sunlight. But which solar power provider should you choose? In this article, we'll provide a list of the best solar companies in the Lone Star State.

Read More Show Less
While chemical mosquito population control measures have been used with some degree of success, they are toxic to other insect populations and to the health of humans. A different angle of defense has emerged, which is genetic modification of the mosquito itself, making it transgenic. CDC

By Lisa Newcomb

Food safety and environmental groups Wednesday condemned a decision by officials in Florida to approve the release of 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes, a pilot project aimed at reducing the spread of mosquito-borne diseases.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Satellite imagery of Isaias on July 31, 2020. CIRA / NOAA

Isaias, the earliest Atlantic "I" storm on record, strengthened into a Category 1 hurricane Thursday and now has the Bahamas and potentially Florida in its path.

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Green Banana will be explored using the same techniques developed for the Amberjack Hole, seen here from a diver's view in 2019. Mote Marine Laboratory

Scientists are rushing to Florida's Gulf Coast to explore a mysterious blue hole located 425 feet deep on the ocean floor.

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The Florida National Guard collects specimens for coronavirus testing at a nursing home on May 1, 2020. Sgt. Michael Baltz / Florida National Guard

Florida has now confirmed more coronavirus cases than New York, the early epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, in another sign that the U.S. as a whole is struggling to control the deadly disease.

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Flooding and a coal ash spill at Duke Energy's Sutton power plant near Wilmington, North Carolina on Sept. 21, 2018 after Hurricane Florence. Jo-Anne McArthur / Waterkeeper Alliance Inc. / Flickr

The threat of a catastrophic failure unleashing a 20-foot wall of industrial wastewater over nearby homes and businesses in Piney Point, Florida, illustrates the danger of widespread reliance on industrial waste ponds across the U.S., The New York Times reports.

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Trending
Marion County Sheriff Billy Woods speaks during a press conference after a shooting at Forest High School on April 20, 2018 in Ocala, Florida. Gerardo Mora / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A sheriff in Florida is under fire for deciding Tuesday to ban his deputies from wearing face masks while on the job—ignoring the advice of public health experts about the safety measures that everyone should take during the coronavirus pandemic as well as the rising Covid-19 death toll in his county and state.

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Naegleria fowleri (commonly referred to as the "brain-eating amoeba") is a free-living microscopic amoeba (single-celled living organism). Centers for Disease Control

As if the surging cases of coronavirus weren't enough for Floridians to handle, now the state's Department of Health (DOH) has confirmed that a person in the Tampa area tested positive for a rare brain-eating amoeba, according to CBS News. The Florida DOH posted a warning to residents to remind them of the dangers of the rare single-celled amoeba that attacks brain tissue.

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About EcoWatch
Information
EcoWatch Staff

EcoWatch is a long-time leader in environmental news. Founded in 2005 as an Ohio-based environmental newspaper, today we are a digital platform still dedicated to publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions. While we've grown from a grassroots newspaper of 80,000 print copies to a site with a digital audience of more than two million monthly readers, we are still committed to our founding principle: creating a sustainable future.

Our Mission

Our goal is to empower readers to make informed, environmentally-conscious decisions that support a sustainable future for everyone. Through trustworthy environmental news, solution-based guides, and responsible product reviews, we want to help both the newly-concerned citizen and the veteran environmental activist be part of the solution every single day. Our hope is that we can help everyone become engaged, adopt sustainable practices, and support environmental policies.

We believe that our choices are a powerful force, and that together we can make better choices to create a better future for the planet, for wildlife, and for humanity.

Our Standards

The entire team at EcoWatch is committed to trustworthiness, integrity, and quality in every aspect of our work. Whether it is news and editorial content or product reviews and guides, everything we publish is thoroughly vetted and fact-checked by our staff of editors. Below you can find more specific information on our approach to adhering to high standards both news and reviews publication.

You can also read our Ethics Statement and Affiliate Disclosure for more information.

Editorial Standards

Trustworthiness, accuracy, and reliability come first at EcoWatch. The editorial team stays committed to strict journalistic standards in all stages of news production. We commit to publishing news that is unbiased, objective, accurate, diverse, and fair.

The reporters and editors at EcoWatch adhere to all applicable laws and journalistic standards, including, the Society of Professional Journalists Ethics Code, FTC Guidelines on Disclosure, U.S. Copyright Law, and the Fair Use doctrine.

Additionally, our reporters and editors adhere to strict standards when sourcing facts, data, and claims. The editorial team sources information from reputable and official sources, such as government organizations, official records, scholarly reports, and expert interviews. All sources are hyperlinked within news articles.

Our editorial team is committed to issuing corrections for factual errors on EcoWatch's news stories. We stay transparent about factual errors in our publication. Errors on EcoWatch are addressed swiftly. Once the error has been corrected, a note is issued at the bottom of the news story.

If you spot an error and want to let us know, send us an email at [email protected] We appreciate all feedback.

Review Standards

To help readers make smarter decisions about the products and services in their daily lives, we review eco-friendly brands we know care about the environment and products that we think can make a difference. Every review on our site is created with the following standards in mind:

Accurate - We dig deep into every category and every brand so we can tell fact from fiction. All of the claims in our reviews are backed by credible sources and fact checked by editors. We work to see through greenwashing by brands who just offer talking points.

Impactful - We believe in the products we recommend and aim to review a wide variety of categories and brands. To earn our recommendation, an item or brand must provide a genuine benefit to the planet and your health. We scrutinize everything from the sourcing of materials and the footprint of the manufacturing process to the amount of packaging waste produced. We look for products that meet the highest standards of industry watchdogs and eco-certifications.

Transparent - We seek to explain how we review each category and why we recommend a particular product or service. The goal is for you to leave our site with more than just a list of products to try. We want you to leave our site with the knowledge to identify additional solutions and opportunities to make an impact on your own. All sponsored content is clearly labeled so you know and trust what you're reading.

Accessible - No matter who you are or where you are on your journey towards a more environmentally-conscious life, you are welcome here. Our reviews are written so that anyone can understand what environmental issue is at stake, why addressing it is important, and how the service or product we recommend can help.

Positive - There are habits and choices we can all adopt to be better stewards of our planet and each other. We understand that beyond individual actions, systemic changes may be needed. Accordingly, we aim to provide the information and insights necessary for all of us to find solutions and make a difference, together.

You can learn more about our process by visiting our Reviews Methodology page.

How We Make Money

Each product featured in our reviews has been independently selected by the writer based on our standards and any industry-specific criteria. We do have financial relationships with certain affiliates, advertisers, sponsors and other third parties that we review. If you make a purchase using a link to one of these affiliates, we may earn a commission on that sale. An affiliate disclosure is always included on the page of any content that contains an affiliate link.

Also, you may see third party ads posted on the site. Each time you click on such an ad, we will receive compensation from the third party advertiser, even if you do not purchase something from the third party.
While there is a paid connection between some of the products or services mentioned, reviewed, or recommended on our site, we still seek to provide our honest opinions, findings, beliefs, and experiences as they relate to the products and services that we review.

All sponsored content is clearly labeled as such, and our affiliate relationships do not influence the accuracy or quality of our reviews content.

For information about our commitment to privacy and our use of cookies, please see our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Meet Our Team

Irma Omerhodzic

Managing Editor

Irma joined the EcoWatch team in August 2015 as an editorial assistant after graduating from the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University with a bachelor's degree. She was then EcoWatch's associate editor until August 2019. Since August of 2019, Irma has been earning her master's degree from the E.W. Scripps School.

Born in Bosnia & Herzegovina, Irma moved to the U.S. in 1997 after having been refuged to Germany as a result of the Yugoslavian civil war.

She is passionate about coming together as a collective unit for the planet, in order to restore Earth back to its natural state of balance and unity. In her spare time, Irma enjoys hikes with her dog Myla, riding her bike and listening to podcasts.

Chris McDermott


Senior Editor

Chris has a Ph.D. in English from the University of Georgia and a B.S. from Cornell University, where he studied human development and environmental analysis.

He was a staff writer for The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, and a contributor to Flagpole Magazine and Georgia Magazine.

Born in New York, he's immersed in writing and music projects, and enjoys bicycling, hiking, swimming and travel.

Meredith Rosenberg

Senior Editor

Meredith holds a Master's from the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism in NYC and a B.A. from Temple University in Philadelphia.

Prior to joining EcoWatch, Meredith spent years working in the travel sector, whether freelance writing for outlets such as Travel Channel and CNN Travel or working on staff at Conde Nast Traveler.

She's based in NJ, where she finds sanity through her 15-year yoga practice and hiking in local reservations. She'd love to own an animal sanctuary.

Olivia Rosane

Contributing Reporter

Olivia has been writing on the internet for more than five years and has covered social movements for YES! Magazine and ecological themes for Real Life. For her recent master's in Art and Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London, she completed a creative dissertation imagining sustainable communities surviving in post-climate-change London.

She has lived in New York, Vermont, London, and Seattle, but wherever she lives, she likes to go to the greenest place she can find, take long, meandering walks, and write poems about its wildflowers.

Follow her on Twitter @orosane.

Tiffany Duong

Contributing Reporter

Tiffany is an avid ocean advocate. She holds degrees from UCLA and the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School and is an Al Gore Climate Reality Leader and student member of The Explorer's Club.

She spent years as a renewable energy lawyer in L.A. before moving to the Amazon to conduct conservation fieldwork (and revamp her life). She eventually landed in the Florida Keys as a scientific scuba diver and field reporter and writes about the oceans, climate, and the environment from her slice of paradise.

When she's not underwater, she can be found on her yoga mat or planning her next adventure.

Follow her on Twitter/Instagram @lilicedt.

Randy Showstack

Contributing Reporter

Randy has covered environmental, climate, energy, earth science, and natural hazards issues for decades, focusing on policy, politics, and science in these areas. He most recently was senior staff writer for Eos, a news service of the Earth and space sciences published by the American Geophysical Union.

A graduate of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, Randy also is the president of the Society of Professional Journalists' Washington, D.C. Chapter.

Follow him on Twitter @RandyShowstack.

Melissa Smith

Contributing Reporter

Melissa is an avid writer, scuba diver, backpacker, and all-around outdoor enthusiast. She graduated from the University of Florida with degrees in journalism and sustainable studies. Before joining EcoWatch, Melissa worked as the managing editor of Scuba Diving magazine and the communications manager of The Ocean Agency, a non-profit that's featured in the Emmy award-winning documentary Chasing Coral.

Along with writing about the environment, Melissa volunteers with the Our World-Underwater Scholarship Society, Florida Trail Association, and the Turtle Survival Alliance, through which she holds a state permit to conduct freshwater turtle research in Florida's springs. Melissa is also a founding member of the Fridays For Future chapter in Orlando, Florida.

Marc Lewis

Executive Editor

Marc is responsible for the editorial vision of the publication. Before joining EcoWatch, he co-founded and led health website focused on helping consumers separate fact from fiction in the natural wellness and supplement space. His is passionate about understanding the issues facing our planet, especially as they relate to emerging solutions. He wants to help people understand the challenges we face so they can make decisions about their habits, health, and consumption. His perspective has been featured in Business Insider, Forbes, MarketWatch, and Yahoo.

Devon Gailey

Digital Content Producer

Devon is a photographer, videographer, and designer. In addition to creating engaging digital content across online media channels, she leads EcoWatch's community outreach initiatives. This includes networking with third-party advocacy partners. A North Carolina native, she holds a B.A. in Media Arts and Entertainment from Elon University.

Jim Geikie

Advisor

Jim Geikie is a partner in One Better Ventures, a B-Corp-certified investment and advisory firm based in Raleigh, North Carolina. One Better Ventures works with companies that promote human wellness, environmental sustainability, and social justice. Prior to One Better Ventures, Jim spent a decade as an executive at Burt's Bees, an earth-friendly natural personal care company.

John Replogle

Advisor

John Replogle is a leader in the conscious consumer and mission-driven brand movement, with extensive experience leading fast growth, high performing businesses including Seventh Generation and Burt's Bees. Seventh Generation helped to launch the B Corp movement and has been awarded the "Best for the World" distinction from B Labs. John believes that business is one of the most powerful forces on earth and such power must be harnessed for the greater good. He also served as President of Unilever's Skin Care business and President of the Guinness Bass Import Company. John started his career at the Boston Consulting Group and holds degrees from Harvard Business School and Dartmouth College.

Recently, John is a Founding Partner of One Better Ventures, a Real Leader 100 social impact firm that advises and invests in mission driven consumer goods companies. He serves on the Boards of Seventh Generation, Dartmouth, Leesa Sleep, Cree, Melissa & Doug, Beautycounter and BEST NC. He is an active environmentalist and champion of social entrepreneurs. He and his wife Kristin live in Raleigh, NC and they are proud to have raised four smart, strong daughters with big hearts.

EcoWatch.com is owned by Remedy Review LLC. The website is built by RebelMouse. RebelMouse builds technology that enables companies to succeed in the world of distributed publishing. RebelMouse technology makes it easy to find and grow relationships with social influencers and connect content with its maximum audience.

People visit Jacksonville Beach on July 4, 2020 in Jacksonville Beach, Florida. Public health experts have attributed Florida's growing coronavirus caseload to people gathering in crowds. Sam Greenwood / Getty Images

Florida broke the national record for the most new coronavirus cases reported in a single day on Sunday, with a total of 15,299.

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A view of Lake Powell from Romana Mesa, Utah, on Sept. 8, 2018. DEA / S. AMANTINI / Contributor / Getty Images

By Robert Glennon

Interstate water disputes are as American as apple pie. States often think a neighboring state is using more than its fair share from a river, lake or aquifer that crosses borders.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Sea Turtle Hospital at Whitney / Instagram

By David Duffy and Catherine Eastman

Plastic pollution has been found in practically every environment on the planet, with especially severe effects on ocean life. Plastic waste harms marine life in many ways – most notably, when animals become entangled in it or consume it.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A large loggerhead with other injuries washed ashore during the latest cold-stunning event and was treated at New England Aquarium. New England Aquarium

Hundreds of endangered sea turtles were stranded on beaches after suffering "cold stunning" in the waters off Cape Cod, Mass. Local rescuers and wildlife rehabilitators stabilized the turtles at the New England Aquarium (NEAQ) and National Marine Life Center and began treatment. Many of the sea turtles were transported by land or air to partner facilities around the Eastern Seaboard for longer-term care to make room for more incoming, cold-stunned animals.

Read More Show Less
Patrick Fraser / DigitalVision / Getty Images

Throughout Texas, there are a number of solar power companies that can install solar panels on your roof to take advantage of the abundant sunlight. But which solar power provider should you choose? In this article, we'll provide a list of the best solar companies in the Lone Star State.

Read More Show Less
While chemical mosquito population control measures have been used with some degree of success, they are toxic to other insect populations and to the health of humans. A different angle of defense has emerged, which is genetic modification of the mosquito itself, making it transgenic. CDC

By Lisa Newcomb

Food safety and environmental groups Wednesday condemned a decision by officials in Florida to approve the release of 750 million genetically modified mosquitoes, a pilot project aimed at reducing the spread of mosquito-borne diseases.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Satellite imagery of Isaias on July 31, 2020. CIRA / NOAA

Isaias, the earliest Atlantic "I" storm on record, strengthened into a Category 1 hurricane Thursday and now has the Bahamas and potentially Florida in its path.

Read More Show Less
Green Banana will be explored using the same techniques developed for the Amberjack Hole, seen here from a diver's view in 2019. Mote Marine Laboratory

Scientists are rushing to Florida's Gulf Coast to explore a mysterious blue hole located 425 feet deep on the ocean floor.

Read More Show Less
The Florida National Guard collects specimens for coronavirus testing at a nursing home on May 1, 2020. Sgt. Michael Baltz / Florida National Guard

Florida has now confirmed more coronavirus cases than New York, the early epicenter of the U.S. outbreak, in another sign that the U.S. as a whole is struggling to control the deadly disease.