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Air conditioners, like these in a residential and restaurant area of Singapore city, could put a massive strain on electricity grids during more intense heatwaves. Taro Hama @ e-kamakura / Moment / Getty Images

By Tim Radford

Scientists in the U.S. have added a new dimension to the growing hazard of extreme heat. As global average temperatures rise, so do the frequency, duration and intensity of heatwaves.

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El Niño's effect on Antarctica is seen in a tabular iceberg off of Thwaites ice shelf. Jeremy Harbeck / NASA

El Niños are getting stronger due to climate change, according to a new study in Monday's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A "bomb cyclone" hit the Oregon coast Tuesday evening. NWS, Medford, Oregon

Two major storms are already walloping the U.S. in time for Thanksgiving.

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The staircase to a subway station in SOHO with a temporary closure, flood control installation sign. Jeffrey Greenberg / Universal Images Group / Getty Images

The Metropolitan Transit Authority in New York City tested out a new system designed to protect its subways stations from flooding when another super storm hits, creating a bizarre sight on Wednesday, as The Verge reported.

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September 2019 was the hottest on record, according to EU data. David Trood / DigitalVision / Getty Images

September 2019 was the hottest September on record, the EU's Copernicus Climate Change Service reported Friday. This makes it the fourth month in a row this year to be the hottest or near hottest of its kind.

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Rugby World Cup tournament chiefs demonstrate to the media the potential impact of typhoon Hagibis as they announce match cancellations at a press conference held on Oct. 10 in Tokyo. David Rogers / Getty Images Sport

Japan has suffered a brutal stretch this summer — deadly heat waves and downpours and a typhoon that blew through Tokyo leaving travelers stranded. Now the worst seems to approaching this weekend as a super typhoon is on track to batter the country's main island on Saturday, potentially causing grave damage, as the New York Times reported.

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Damage in Ichihara, Chiba prefecture, Japan following Typhoon Hagibis. STR / JIJI PRESS / AFP via Getty Images

At least 42 people have died and 15 are missing after Typhoon Hagibis swamped Japan Saturday, bringing record rainfall that flooded more than 1,000 homes, The Washington Post reported.

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Kathlean Wolf stands among native plants on the edge of a stormwater pond in her Madison, Wisconsin, neighborhood. Samantha Harrington

By Samantha Harrington

It took Kathlean Wolf a few extra minutes to get ready. She had to put the braces on her feet that allow her to walk. But once ready to go, she was winding through tall grasses of the marshy stormwater swale across from her apartment on the east side of Madison, Wisconsin. As she walked, Wolf, a certified master naturalist, pointed out edible plants and called out a hello to a butterfly.

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Flood, earthquake, fire, tornado and weather disaster damage portrayed in illustration. Ryan Etter / Ikon Images / Getty Images

The salient reality of the climate crisis is undeniable to many Americans. We have seen record heat waves from Alaska to Mississippi, record flooding, beaches closed due to algal blooms, increased storm intensity and devastating wildfires in 2019. Now, most Americans say the climate crisis is bearing down on them, and the government needs to do more to stop it, according to a new survey from the nonpartisan Pew Research Center in Washington, DC.

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The aftermath of Hurricane Sandy at Breezy Point, New York. DVIDSHUB / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

Wealthier counties receive more federal home buyouts in the wake of natural disasters than poorer areas, regardless of whether or not these homes are at increased risk of flooding, new research shows.

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Most of the U.S. will likely see higher than normal temperatures this autumn, according to a three-month forecast projected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

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People wade through flood waters in a rural neighborhood affected by Cyclone Idai on March 24. Andrew Renneisen / Getty Images

In another sign of the climate crisis, a record seven million people were displaced from their homes by extreme weather events during the first half of 2019, The New York Times reported Thursday.

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By Emilie Karrick Surrusco

Across the globe, extreme weather is becoming the new normal.

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Franco Origlia / Getty Images / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Pope Francis on Sunday — when Hurricane Dorian began pounding the Bahamas with record strength — urged the world to heed calls made by rising youth and indigenous peoples to take swift action to address the climate crisis and thereby ensure "our common future."

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Mary Daly, president of the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, poses for a photograph. Nick Otto / Washington Post / Getty Images

It seems the reality of the climate crisis is too much for the Federal Reserve to ignore anymore.

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This map shows the temperature of the land on June 26 in Europe and North Africa. Human induced climate change is causing heatwaves to increase in frequency. Modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019) / ESA / CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO

We are almost certainly living through the hottest decade on record, according to a provisional report from the UN's World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

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NASA astronaut Terry Virts captured this Earth observation of Ireland, the UK and Scandinavia on Feb. 6, 2015. The UK and Ireland were the first two countries to declare a climate emergency. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

On the 40th anniversary of the First World Climate Conference, more than 11,000 scientists have come together to urge immediate action on the climate crisis, The Guardian reported.

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A general view of the flooded St. Mark's Square after an exceptional overnight "Alta Acqua" high tide water level, on Nov. 13 in Venice. MARCO BERTORELLO / AFP / Getty Images

Two people have died as Venice has been inundated by the worst flooding it has seen in more than 50 years, The Guardian reported Wednesday.

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Victims of climate change protest for climate refugees on the occasion of the Global Climate March on Nov. 28, 2015 in Kutubdia Island, Bangladesh. Zakir Hossain Chowdhury / Barcro / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Over the past decade, climate-fueled disasters drove over 20 million people a year from their homes, concluded a report released by Oxfam on Monday. The Oxfam study, titled "Forced from Home," was released as two weeks of UN climate negotiations kick-start in Madrid.

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