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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Electric car registrations were up 41% in 2020. Reza Estakhrian / Getty Images

By Walé Azeez

While global car sales took a pandemic-related hit last year, electric vehicles (EVs) bucked the trend.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The world's first battery-electric freight train was unveiled in Pittsburgh. Office of the Allegheny County Executive / Facebook

The world's first ever battery-electric freight train was unveiled in Pittsburgh on Friday.

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Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

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Electric vehicles are the cars of the future. sl-f / Getty Images

By 2035, every new car and truck sold in the U.S. could be an EV, a new report says.

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Trending
Visitors look at a Volkswagen ID.4 electric car at the Autostadt promotional facility next to the Volkswagen factory on Oct. 26, 2020 in Wolfsburg, Germany. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

By David Reichmuth

Over the last month, I've seen a number of opinion articles attacking electric vehicles (EVs). Sadly, this comes as no surprise: now that the Biden administration is introducing federal policies to accelerate the roll out of electric vehicles, we were bound to see a reaction from those that oppose reducing climate changing emissions and petroleum use.

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The U.S. Capitol building in Washington, DC on Aug. 10, 2021. Liu Jie / Xinhua via Getty Images

The Senate passed a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill on Tuesday, and a $3.5 trillion budget resolution early Wednesday morning that, combined, could represent the last major opportunity for Democrats to enact President Joe Biden's promised action on climate change.

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Mining the seafloor to extract minerals like cobalt and nickel that are widely used for EV batteries could put deep ocean ecosystems at risk. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

The internal combustion engine had a good run. It helped get us to where we need to go for more than a century, but its days as the centerpiece of the automotive industry are waning.

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Amsterdam is one of the Netherlands' cities which already has "milieuzones," where some types of vehicles are banned. Unsplash / jennieramida

By Douglas Broom

  • If online deliveries continue with fossil-fuel trucks, emissions will increase by a third.
  • So cities in the Netherlands will allow only emission-free delivery vehicles after 2025.
  • The government is giving delivery firms cash help to buy or lease electric vehicles.
  • The bans will save 1 megaton of CO2 every year by 2030.

Cities in the Netherlands want to make their air cleaner by banning fossil fuel delivery vehicles from urban areas from 2025.

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Champion NASCAR drivers recently had a chance to test a new Ford vehicle.

It has seven motors in it. It has 1,400 horsepower. And it's electric.

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A U.S. Postal Service truck drives down Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC on April 23, 2020. ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP via Getty Images

The Postal Service is updating its massive fleet of mail carrying vehicles, heralding a significant step toward reducing carbon pollution from its massive fleet while also helping to protect its workforce from climate impacts.

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Trending
A new EV charging point in Scotland's Shetland Islands runs on tidal energy. Nova Innovation

The future of electric vehicle charging is already in Scotland, and it's helping push the country toward net-zero carbon emissions.

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A car is seen driving in the snow in Dallas in Feb. 2021. Matthew Rader / CC BY-SA 4.0 / Wikimedia Commons

By Matt Casale

There were many lessons to be learned from Texas' prolonged periods of lost power during its cold snap, which saw temperatures drop into the single digits. But one many people may not recognize is that electric vehicles, or EVs, can be part of a smart resiliency plan — not only in the case of outages triggered by the cold but in other scenarios caused by extreme weather events, from fire-related blackouts in California to hurricane-hit power losses in Puerto Rico.

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The technologies of Elon Musk's empire are creeping across the Earth. They're shooting up into lower orbit and speeding through American highway systems. Through these cars, rockets, and by connecting his corporate work to environmentalism, Musk has molded his image as a modern-day Iron Man, seeking to save the world from itself by innovating boldly into a better future. But as we'll soon see, this is far from the case. The story of Elon Musk is vastly different from the one drummed up by his fanatical fan-base. His future is full of exploitation, dreams of eco-modernism, and ego-driven pursuits. This is the story of Elon Musk, and why he will never be the answer to the climate crisis that so many want him to be.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Electric car registrations were up 41% in 2020. Reza Estakhrian / Getty Images

By Walé Azeez

While global car sales took a pandemic-related hit last year, electric vehicles (EVs) bucked the trend.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The world's first battery-electric freight train was unveiled in Pittsburgh. Office of the Allegheny County Executive / Facebook

The world's first ever battery-electric freight train was unveiled in Pittsburgh on Friday.

Read More Show Less
Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

Read More Show Less
Electric vehicles are the cars of the future. sl-f / Getty Images

By 2035, every new car and truck sold in the U.S. could be an EV, a new report says.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Visitors look at a Volkswagen ID.4 electric car at the Autostadt promotional facility next to the Volkswagen factory on Oct. 26, 2020 in Wolfsburg, Germany. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

By David Reichmuth

Over the last month, I've seen a number of opinion articles attacking electric vehicles (EVs). Sadly, this comes as no surprise: now that the Biden administration is introducing federal policies to accelerate the roll out of electric vehicles, we were bound to see a reaction from those that oppose reducing climate changing emissions and petroleum use.

Read More Show Less
The U.S. Capitol building in Washington, DC on Aug. 10, 2021. Liu Jie / Xinhua via Getty Images

The Senate passed a $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill on Tuesday, and a $3.5 trillion budget resolution early Wednesday morning that, combined, could represent the last major opportunity for Democrats to enact President Joe Biden's promised action on climate change.

Read More Show Less
Mining the seafloor to extract minerals like cobalt and nickel that are widely used for EV batteries could put deep ocean ecosystems at risk. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

The internal combustion engine had a good run. It helped get us to where we need to go for more than a century, but its days as the centerpiece of the automotive industry are waning.