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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Fossilized wood found on Old Faithful's geyser mound suggests that the geyser once stopped erupting long enough for trees to grow there. Ingo Drenberg / EyeEm / Getty Images

In Yellowstone National Park, large crowds watch in awe as Old Faithful erupts with a roar, launching a spire of water about 150 feet in the air.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Inmates line up for breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. John Moore / Getty Images

As extreme heat, drought, and wildfires spread across the state, Arizona is allocating funding to pay incarcerated people fighting those wildfires $1.50 per hour.

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mountain photograph
Photo by Gene Jeter on Unsplash

The majority of all Texas residents live in a deregulated energy market. This means every day, people have the freedom to switch to a different provider in their service area to save money. Competition helps keep prices down, and Texas energy rates are below the national average.

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The grasshopper population is swelling in the U.S. West. John Brandauer / Flickr

The hot, dry weather baking the U.S. West is causing another problem for the beleaguered region: an overabundance of grasshoppers.

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Old Faithful erupting in Yellowstone National Park on May 25, 2021 in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

The climate crisis is here, and it is already transforming one of the most iconic national parks in the U.S.

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Park staff take pictures of a thermometer display showing temperatures of 130° Fahrenheit (54° Celsius) at the Furnace Creek Visitor's Center at Death Valley National Park in June 17, 2021 in Furnace Creek, California. PATRICK T. FALLON / AFP via Getty Images

A heat wave scorched the U.S. West just before the official start of summer, bringing record-breaking temperatures, worsening a dangerous drought and offering yet another example of how the climate crisis has upended our idea of normal.

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A woman carries a bucket of water on an improvised bridge over dry land alongside the Amazon River at Bom Jesus village at the margin of Solimoes river in Amazonas State, Brazil. Jose Caldas / Brazil Photos / LightRocket via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Researchers at the University of Leeds in Britain published new research Tuesday — World Rainforest Day — showing that massive swaths of the eastern Amazon are at risk of severe drying by the end of this century if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced.

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The sun sets behind power lines in Los Angeles, California on Sept. 3, 2020, ahead of a heat wave. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Mutually worsening heat and drought, both fueled by climate change, are stifling the American West, stoking wildfire fears and straining electrical grids — and the worst is far from over.

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Trending
Minimal snow was found at the Phillips Station meadow before the start of the first snow survey of 2018, conducted by the California Department of Water Resources. Kelly M. Grow / Calif. Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

Most of us know a bad drought when we see one: Lakes and rivers recede from their normal water lines, crops wither in fields, and lawns turn brown. Usually we think of these droughts as being triggered by a lack of rain, but scientists also track drought in other ways.

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A single-engine tanker makes a water drop on a wildfire in central Washington on Aug. 9, 2018. Nick Pieper, BLM

By Tara Lohan

In early May scientists discovered a plume of smoke wafting from a smoldering sequoia that ignited during 2020's Castle fire, which set California's Sequoia National Forest alight last August.

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A local activist extinguishes a peat fire in a Suzunsky forest south of the Siberian city of Novosibirsk on Sept. 11, 2020. 'Zombie' fires in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions are becoming more common as global temperatures rise. ALEXANDER NEMENOV / AFP via Getty Images
As if drought, flooding, extreme hurricanes, and deadly heat waves weren't enough, climate change could make "zombie" forest fires more common, scientists say.
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A single burning giant sequoia in Board Camp Grove from the 2020 Castle Fire in the southwestern area of Sequoia National Park. National Park Service / Tony Caprio

A giant sequoia is still smoldering after last year's Castle Fire, an illustration of the severity of last year's fire season and an indication of California's drought, The Associated Press reports.

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Ekom Waterfall in a rainforest in Cameroon, Africa. antoineede / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Aptly called, "Earth's lungs," the planet's two largest swaths of rainforest, in Amazonia and Africa, suck up 15 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions produced by humans. These ecosystems are essential for carbon sequestration and therefore curbing climate change, and while the Amazon rainforest has been the subject of mountains of research, scientists are just now beginning to understand how rainforests in Central and Western Africa respond to small changes in climate — and it's good news.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Fossilized wood found on Old Faithful's geyser mound suggests that the geyser once stopped erupting long enough for trees to grow there. Ingo Drenberg / EyeEm / Getty Images

In Yellowstone National Park, large crowds watch in awe as Old Faithful erupts with a roar, launching a spire of water about 150 feet in the air.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Inmates line up for breakfast at the Maricopa County Tent City jail on March 11, 2013 in Phoenix, Arizona. John Moore / Getty Images

As extreme heat, drought, and wildfires spread across the state, Arizona is allocating funding to pay incarcerated people fighting those wildfires $1.50 per hour.

Read More Show Less
mountain photograph
Photo by Gene Jeter on Unsplash

The majority of all Texas residents live in a deregulated energy market. This means every day, people have the freedom to switch to a different provider in their service area to save money. Competition helps keep prices down, and Texas energy rates are below the national average.

Read More Show Less
The grasshopper population is swelling in the U.S. West. John Brandauer / Flickr

The hot, dry weather baking the U.S. West is causing another problem for the beleaguered region: an overabundance of grasshoppers.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Old Faithful erupting in Yellowstone National Park on May 25, 2021 in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

The climate crisis is here, and it is already transforming one of the most iconic national parks in the U.S.

Read More Show Less
Park staff take pictures of a thermometer display showing temperatures of 130° Fahrenheit (54° Celsius) at the Furnace Creek Visitor's Center at Death Valley National Park in June 17, 2021 in Furnace Creek, California. PATRICK T. FALLON / AFP via Getty Images

A heat wave scorched the U.S. West just before the official start of summer, bringing record-breaking temperatures, worsening a dangerous drought and offering yet another example of how the climate crisis has upended our idea of normal.

Read More Show Less
A woman carries a bucket of water on an improvised bridge over dry land alongside the Amazon River at Bom Jesus village at the margin of Solimoes river in Amazonas State, Brazil. Jose Caldas / Brazil Photos / LightRocket via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Researchers at the University of Leeds in Britain published new research Tuesday — World Rainforest Day — showing that massive swaths of the eastern Amazon are at risk of severe drying by the end of this century if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced.

Read More Show Less
The sun sets behind power lines in Los Angeles, California on Sept. 3, 2020, ahead of a heat wave. FREDERIC J. BROWN / AFP via Getty Images

Mutually worsening heat and drought, both fueled by climate change, are stifling the American West, stoking wildfire fears and straining electrical grids — and the worst is far from over.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Minimal snow was found at the Phillips Station meadow before the start of the first snow survey of 2018, conducted by the California Department of Water Resources. Kelly M. Grow / Calif. Department of Water Resources

By Tara Lohan

Most of us know a bad drought when we see one: Lakes and rivers recede from their normal water lines, crops wither in fields, and lawns turn brown. Usually we think of these droughts as being triggered by a lack of rain, but scientists also track drought in other ways.

Read More Show Less
A single-engine tanker makes a water drop on a wildfire in central Washington on Aug. 9, 2018. Nick Pieper, BLM

By Tara Lohan

In early May scientists discovered a plume of smoke wafting from a smoldering sequoia that ignited during 2020's Castle fire, which set California's Sequoia National Forest alight last August.

Read More Show Less
Trending