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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
PFAS chemicals can be found in soil, drinking water, the air, food packaging, cosmetics, cookware, various household products, and industrial workplaces—resulting in widespread exposure to humans and the environment. Bastiaan Slabbers / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Jenna McGuire

Maine enacted a groundbreaking law on Thursday, banning the use of so-called "forever chemicals" in all products by 2030, except in instances deemed "currently unavoidable."

Maine is the first state in the U.S. and first government in the world to implement a ban on the toxic chemicals per- and polyfluoroalkyl, known as PFAS, which are notorious for not breaking down easily in the environment and can remain in a person's body for decades after exposure.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
47 faith institutions from 21 countries have announced they would divest from fossil fuels. acilo / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Climate action campaigners applauded Monday after 47 faith institutions from 21 countries announced they would divest from fossil fuels, marking the largest-ever joint divestment by religious leaders in history.

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Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

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Hundreds of Thousands Take to Streets Worldwide for 'Uproot the System' Climate Strikes

"It's even more urgent now than it was before," said Greta Thunberg.

Politics
Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks at a large-scale climate strike march by Fridays for Future in front of the Reichstag on Sept. 24, 2021 in Berlin, Germany. Maja Hitij / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Young people by the hundreds of thousands took to the streets across the globe on Friday to deliver a resounding message to world leaders: The climate crisis is getting worse, and only radical action will be enough to avert catastrophe and secure a just, sustainable future for all.

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Rescuers evacuate a child from a flooded area following heavy rains in Suizhou, in China's central Hubei province on Aug. 12, 2021. CNS / AFP via Getty Images

By Julia Conley

On Friday, the third anniversary of climate campaigner Greta Thunberg's lone protest outside the Swedish Parliament, a global report revealed the scale of risks posed by the climate emergency for the world's children.

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Matteo Colombo / Moment / Getty Images

For nearly 100 years, the Empire State Building has stood as a testament to the industriousness and economic power of the United States. Now, it can also be considered a beacon for the future of sustainable energy. Empire State Realty Trust (ESRT) signed a deal in early February to convert the Empire State Building, along with all of its other real estate holdings, to 100% renewable energy.

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An Extinction Rebellion protester outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In another win for climate campaigners, leaders of 12 major cities around the world — collectively home to about 36 million people — committed Tuesday to divesting from fossil fuel companies and investing in a green, just recovery from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

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U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman and National Petroleum Council Chair Lee Raymond attend the 118th meeting of the NPC on Sept. 17, 2008 in Washington, DC. Raymond was the chief executive officer and chairman of ExxonMobil from 1999 to 2005 and his retirement package was worth about $400 million, the largest in history for a U.S. public company. Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Lee Raymond, former ExxonMobil CEO, will resign from the JPMorgan board of directors at the end of the year.

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Trending
Environmental activists carry a large snake pipeline as they protest against the Enbridge Line 3 oil pipeline on May 7, 2021 in Washington, DC. Drew Angerer / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

From fake oil spills in Washington, D.C. and New York City to a "people mural" in Seattle spelling out "Defund Line 3," climate and Indigenous protesters in 50 U.S. cities and across seven other countries spanning four continents took to the streets on Friday for a day of action pushing 20 banks to ditch the controversial tar sands pipeline.

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By Liz Kimbrough

Six grassroots environmental activists will receive the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize in a virtual ceremony this year. Dubbed the "Green Nobel Prize," this award is given annually to environmental heroes from each of the world's six inhabited continents.

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Trending
A cemetery is surrounded by chemical plants in Baton Rouge, Louisiana on Oct. 15, 2013. Giles Clarke / Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Calling a planned petrochemical manufacturing complex in Louisiana's "Cancer Alley" a "textbook case of environmental racism," 175 organizations from around the world sent a letter to financial institutions Tuesday urging them not to fund, underwrite, or invest in the project, which could cost up to $12 billion.

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A fire burns at the ExxonMobil Olefins Plant in Baytown, Texas on July 31, 2019. michelmond / iStock Editorial / Getty Images Plus

A Norwegian hedge fund worth more than $90 billion has become the first major financial institution to divest from companies that lobby against action on the climate crisis, The Guardian reported Monday.

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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg is interviewed during a "Fridays for Future" protest in front of the Swedish Parliament Riksdagen in Stockholm on October 9, 2020. JONATHAN NACKSTRAND / AFP / Getty Images

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg attacked powerful politicians for ignoring climate change, as she called for an end to government subsidies for fossil fuels such as coal and oil.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
PFAS chemicals can be found in soil, drinking water, the air, food packaging, cosmetics, cookware, various household products, and industrial workplaces—resulting in widespread exposure to humans and the environment. Bastiaan Slabbers / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Jenna McGuire

Maine enacted a groundbreaking law on Thursday, banning the use of so-called "forever chemicals" in all products by 2030, except in instances deemed "currently unavoidable."

Maine is the first state in the U.S. and first government in the world to implement a ban on the toxic chemicals per- and polyfluoroalkyl, known as PFAS, which are notorious for not breaking down easily in the environment and can remain in a person's body for decades after exposure.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
47 faith institutions from 21 countries have announced they would divest from fossil fuels. acilo / Getty Images

By Julia Conley

Climate action campaigners applauded Monday after 47 faith institutions from 21 countries announced they would divest from fossil fuels, marking the largest-ever joint divestment by religious leaders in history.

Read More Show Less
Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

Read More Show Less
Hundreds of Thousands Take to Streets Worldwide for 'Uproot the System' Climate Strikes

"It's even more urgent now than it was before," said Greta Thunberg.

Politics
Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks at a large-scale climate strike march by Fridays for Future in front of the Reichstag on Sept. 24, 2021 in Berlin, Germany. Maja Hitij / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Young people by the hundreds of thousands took to the streets across the globe on Friday to deliver a resounding message to world leaders: The climate crisis is getting worse, and only radical action will be enough to avert catastrophe and secure a just, sustainable future for all.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Rescuers evacuate a child from a flooded area following heavy rains in Suizhou, in China's central Hubei province on Aug. 12, 2021. CNS / AFP via Getty Images

By Julia Conley

On Friday, the third anniversary of climate campaigner Greta Thunberg's lone protest outside the Swedish Parliament, a global report revealed the scale of risks posed by the climate emergency for the world's children.

Read More Show Less
Matteo Colombo / Moment / Getty Images

For nearly 100 years, the Empire State Building has stood as a testament to the industriousness and economic power of the United States. Now, it can also be considered a beacon for the future of sustainable energy. Empire State Realty Trust (ESRT) signed a deal in early February to convert the Empire State Building, along with all of its other real estate holdings, to 100% renewable energy.

Read More Show Less
An Extinction Rebellion protester outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In another win for climate campaigners, leaders of 12 major cities around the world — collectively home to about 36 million people — committed Tuesday to divesting from fossil fuel companies and investing in a green, just recovery from the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.