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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Burning forest in Rondonia in 2020. Fabio Nascimento

Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon surged during the month of April, ending a streak of three consecutive months where forest clearing had been lower than the prior year. The rise in deforestation came despite a high-profile pledge from Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro to rein in deforestation in Earth's largest rainforest.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A Meat Atlas 2021 graphic shows greenhouse gas emissions of leading meat and milk firms. Bartz / Stockmar / CC-BY 4.0

The world's five biggest meat and dairy companies emit the same volume of greenhouse gases as fossil fuel giant ExxonMobil.

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Best Period Underwear of 2022: 6 Sustainable Options

Switching to period panties doesn't have to be messy.

Reviews
Yulia Lisitsa / Getty Images

When your time of the month comes unexpectedly and you have to rush to the store, tampons, pads and panty liners are the majority of what you traditionally find when looking in the menstrual hygiene aisle. Recently, period underwear has risen in popularity to prevent the unnecessary waste that comes from using these products.

Period panties are a newer form of menstrual care that can both replace the need for disposable hygiene products and be a solution for preventing messy leaks. They're an ecologically smart alternative to single-use period products and a great long-term investment for those who want a more comfortable and easier menstrual solution.

Every person and menstrual cycle is unique. In this article, we'll explain the benefits of period underwear and help you find what type of underwear is perfect for you.

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Chapman's pygmy chameleon is one of the world's rarest chameleons, and now clings to survival in small patches of forest. Krystal Tolley

An extremely rare species of chameleon feared to be extinct has been found alive, for now.

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An Indonesian forestry company with possible links to pulpwood and palm oil powerhouse Royal Golden Eagle has cleared forests the size of 500,000 basketball courts since 2016. Bay ISMOYO / AFP/ Getty Images

By Hans Nicholas Jong

An Indonesian forestry company with possible links to pulpwood and palm oil powerhouse Royal Golden Eagle has cleared forests the size of 500,000 basketball courts since 2016, some of them home to critically endangered orangutans, according to a new report.

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A harpy eagle with her nest. Education Images / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Harpy eagles are the largest eagles in the Americas and one of the largest eagle species in the world, with adult females weighing as much as 22 pounds.

But these massive birds are running out of room and food, a study published in Scientific Reports Wednesday has found.

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EcoWatch Illustration by Devon Gailey

From animal welfare to deforestation and greenhouse gas emissions, there is growing awareness of the harmful effects of factory farming and meat consumption.

Now, a new study published in PLOS One Wednesday uncovered another way in which too much meat eating harms the environment: It puts more nitrogen into human waste, threatening coastal ecosystems like coral reefs.

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The sun sets as smoke from illegal fires in an area of Amazon rainforest lingers, south of Novo Progresso in Para state, Brazil, on Aug. 15, 2020. CARL DE SOUZA / AFP via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Following years of warnings and mounting fears among scientists, "terrifying" research revealed Wednesday that climate change and deforestation have turned parts of the Amazon basin, a crucial "sink," into a source of planet-heating carbon dioxide.

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An aerial photograph by Greenpeace in Central Kalimantan province on Indonesia's Borneo Island showed deforestation to make way for a palm oil plantation on Feb. 24, 2014. BAY ISMOYO / AFP via Getty Images

Over the past 40 years, about 50 percent of lowland rainforests in Southeast Asia have been converted for palm oil and other plantations, and remaining forests in the region are heavily logged, according to new research. Yet while the impacts of fragmentation on old-growth forests are well understood, how fragmentation impacts regenerating logged forests isn't.

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Amazônia is a striking photographic record of the Amazon and its Indigenous inhabitants. Sebastião Salgado / Taschen

"Beautiful. Essential. The future is Amazônia."

These were the words that renowned Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado used to describe the Amazon Rainforest, the subject of his latest photography collection.

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'The nation's worst polluters managed to evade accountability and scrutiny for decades as they helped the fossil fuel industry destroy our planet.' Illustration: Jason Goad / The Guardian

By Georgia Wright, Liat Olenick and Amy Westervelt

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

For too long, Americans were fed a false narrative that they should feel individually guilty about the climate crisis. The reality is that only a handful of powerful individuals bear the personal responsibility.

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A woman carries a bucket of water on an improvised bridge over dry land alongside the Amazon River at Bom Jesus village at the margin of Solimoes river in Amazonas State, Brazil. Jose Caldas / Brazil Photos / LightRocket via Getty Images

By Brett Wilkins

Researchers at the University of Leeds in Britain published new research Tuesday — World Rainforest Day — showing that massive swaths of the eastern Amazon are at risk of severe drying by the end of this century if greenhouse gas emissions are not reduced.

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Extinction Rebellion protesters block the roads outside the Bank of England on Oct. 14, 2019 in London, England. John Keeble / Getty Images

After six months of deliberation, an international panel of 12 legal experts has drafted an official definition of ecocide.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Burning forest in Rondonia in 2020. Fabio Nascimento

Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon surged during the month of April, ending a streak of three consecutive months where forest clearing had been lower than the prior year. The rise in deforestation came despite a high-profile pledge from Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro to rein in deforestation in Earth's largest rainforest.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A Meat Atlas 2021 graphic shows greenhouse gas emissions of leading meat and milk firms. Bartz / Stockmar / CC-BY 4.0

The world's five biggest meat and dairy companies emit the same volume of greenhouse gases as fossil fuel giant ExxonMobil.

Read More Show Less
Best Period Underwear of 2022: 6 Sustainable Options

Switching to period panties doesn't have to be messy.

Reviews
Yulia Lisitsa / Getty Images

When your time of the month comes unexpectedly and you have to rush to the store, tampons, pads and panty liners are the majority of what you traditionally find when looking in the menstrual hygiene aisle. Recently, period underwear has risen in popularity to prevent the unnecessary waste that comes from using these products.

Period panties are a newer form of menstrual care that can both replace the need for disposable hygiene products and be a solution for preventing messy leaks. They're an ecologically smart alternative to single-use period products and a great long-term investment for those who want a more comfortable and easier menstrual solution.

Every person and menstrual cycle is unique. In this article, we'll explain the benefits of period underwear and help you find what type of underwear is perfect for you.

Read More Show Less
Chapman's pygmy chameleon is one of the world's rarest chameleons, and now clings to survival in small patches of forest. Krystal Tolley

An extremely rare species of chameleon feared to be extinct has been found alive, for now.

Read More Show Less
Trending
An Indonesian forestry company with possible links to pulpwood and palm oil powerhouse Royal Golden Eagle has cleared forests the size of 500,000 basketball courts since 2016. Bay ISMOYO / AFP/ Getty Images

By Hans Nicholas Jong

An Indonesian forestry company with possible links to pulpwood and palm oil powerhouse Royal Golden Eagle has cleared forests the size of 500,000 basketball courts since 2016, some of them home to critically endangered orangutans, according to a new report.

Read More Show Less
A harpy eagle with her nest. Education Images / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Harpy eagles are the largest eagles in the Americas and one of the largest eagle species in the world, with adult females weighing as much as 22 pounds.

But these massive birds are running out of room and food, a study published in Scientific Reports Wednesday has found.

Read More Show Less