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Mountains of produce, including eggs, milk and onions, are going to waste as the COVID-19 pandemic shutters restaurants, restricts transport, limits what workers are able to do and disrupts supply chains. United States government work

By Emma Charlton

Gluts of food left to rot as a consequence of coronavirus aren't just wasteful – they're also likely to damage the environment.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Giacomo Berardi / Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed both the strengths and limitations of globalization. The crisis has made people aware of how industrialized food production can be, and just how far food can travel to get to the local supermarket. There are many benefits to this system, including low prices for consumers and larger, even global, markets for producers. But there are also costs — to the environment, workers, small farmers and to a region or individual nation's food security.

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Packs of 'Brexit Selection Freshly Chlorinated Chicken' sit on display at 'Costupper' Brexit Minimart pop-up store, set up by the People's Vote campaign group, to demonstrate predicted price rises and supply problems in south London, United Kingdom on Nov. 23, 2018. Tayfun Salci / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

A hot-button issue in the UK focuses on something most Americans don't even know about: a particular method of disinfecting raw poultry.

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Janel Bodley tamps down soil around a freshly planted hemp clone at Wild Folk Farm in Benton. Ben McCanna / Portland Portland Press Herald / Getty Images

By Tom Levitt

The future of food doesn't have to include animals. At least that's what Miyoko Schinner believes. "A lot of farmers see us as a threat," Schinner said of her Californian plant-based dairy company, Miyoko's Creamery.

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An employee restocks the meat section at a grocery store in Miami, Florida on April 13. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Now might be a good time to go vegetarian.

As meat-processing plants close across the country to stop the new coronavirus from spreading among employees, industry leaders and experts are warning of meat shortages in the nation's grocery stores.

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A Tyson plant in Wallula, Washington that has also seen a coronavirus outbreak. David Ryder / Getty Images

A Tyson Foods pork plant in Storm Lake, Iowa announced it would close Thursday after more than 20 percent of its workforce tested positive for the new coronavirus.

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Eddy Zecchinon / EyeEm / iStock

By Katherine Marengo, LDN, RD

Frozen vegetables are always a good idea — but they're a real lifesaver when you have a new baby.

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KFC tests meatless chicken wings and nuggets in US

By George Citroner

With the growing popularity of meat-free eating, U.S. restaurant chain KFC has partnered with Beyond Meat to test a new plant-based "fried chicken" offering.

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Tj Samuels / EyeEm / Getty Images

By Danielle Nierenberg and Gabby Lozano

Throughout the United States and around the world, millions of people gather in June for Pride Month, a time to celebrate the LGBTQ+ community and honor their contributions to the world.

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Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) take part in the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

The dangers of working shoulder-to-shoulder in a meat processing plant have come to the forefront as the novel coronavirus has exposed the fragility of the meat industry's supply chain. Factory farming is also resource intensive, leading to deforestation and fueling the climate crisis. It also accounts for 99 percent of the meat that Americans consume.

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Alexander Spatari / Moment / Getty Images

By Jillian Kubala, MS, RD

If you're feeling stressed, it's only natural to seek relief.

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Woman wears medical mask while grocery shopping. Space_Cat / Getty Images

By Cathy Cassata

While you plan to stock up on groceries during the pandemic, you may be wondering which items with a longer shelf life are the healthier choices to add to your cart, and which are the unhealthy ones to stay away from.

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Chickens raised for meat in McDonald's supply chain suffer every day. ANDREW SKOWRON / OPEN CAGES / The Humane League

By Taylor Ford

Golden arches tainted with blood. A ribbon-cutting ceremony for the "Headquarters of Cruelty." Dozens of protesters. Horrified passersby.

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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Mountains of produce, including eggs, milk and onions, are going to waste as the COVID-19 pandemic shutters restaurants, restricts transport, limits what workers are able to do and disrupts supply chains. United States government work

By Emma Charlton

Gluts of food left to rot as a consequence of coronavirus aren't just wasteful – they're also likely to damage the environment.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Giacomo Berardi / Unsplash

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed both the strengths and limitations of globalization. The crisis has made people aware of how industrialized food production can be, and just how far food can travel to get to the local supermarket. There are many benefits to this system, including low prices for consumers and larger, even global, markets for producers. But there are also costs — to the environment, workers, small farmers and to a region or individual nation's food security.

Read More Show Less
Packs of 'Brexit Selection Freshly Chlorinated Chicken' sit on display at 'Costupper' Brexit Minimart pop-up store, set up by the People's Vote campaign group, to demonstrate predicted price rises and supply problems in south London, United Kingdom on Nov. 23, 2018. Tayfun Salci / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Dan Nosowitz

A hot-button issue in the UK focuses on something most Americans don't even know about: a particular method of disinfecting raw poultry.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch

Janel Bodley tamps down soil around a freshly planted hemp clone at Wild Folk Farm in Benton. Ben McCanna / Portland Portland Press Herald / Getty Images

By Tom Levitt

The future of food doesn't have to include animals. At least that's what Miyoko Schinner believes. "A lot of farmers see us as a threat," Schinner said of her Californian plant-based dairy company, Miyoko's Creamery.

Read More Show Less

Trending

An employee restocks the meat section at a grocery store in Miami, Florida on April 13. Joe Raedle / Getty Images

Now might be a good time to go vegetarian.

As meat-processing plants close across the country to stop the new coronavirus from spreading among employees, industry leaders and experts are warning of meat shortages in the nation's grocery stores.

Read More Show Less
A Tyson plant in Wallula, Washington that has also seen a coronavirus outbreak. David Ryder / Getty Images

A Tyson Foods pork plant in Storm Lake, Iowa announced it would close Thursday after more than 20 percent of its workforce tested positive for the new coronavirus.

Read More Show Less