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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Shelley's Eagle Owl. Dr Robert Williams

Shelley's eagle owls are the largest owls that live in Africa's rainforests, according to HuffPost, but they have still managed to stay well hidden.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Some of the youth petitioners who appealed to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child for protection against climate change and its effects attended the global climate strike in Sept. 2019 in New York. Michael Rubenstein / EarthJustice

In a "stunning" and upsetting decision, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child refused to hear the case of 16 youth from around the world who are threatened by the climate crisis.

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Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

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EcoWatch Illustration by Devon Gailey

With Thanksgiving and the holiday season right around the corner, we're gearing up for a period of celebration and gathering with friends and loved ones.

Holiday events and parties – like birthdays, wedding showers, graduations, anniversaries – are often quite wasteful, but don't have to be! Plan a party that's fun, festive, and sustainable.

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Ikea is among the companies implementing circular economy initiatives. Visual China Group / Getty Images

By Sean Fleming

What goes around comes around, according to the old saying. And in the case of the circular economy, that's certainly true.

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USDA NRCS Montana

By Dipika Kadaba

The emergence of multiple pandemics in the animal agriculture industry over the past few decades, coupled with COVID-19's suspected origins in wildlife meat markets, has prompted renewed calls from experts to transform the global food system to prevent diseases harmful to humans.

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We’re Miscalculating the Cancer Risk From a Massive Class of Chemicals: MIT Study

Regulators need to look at a broader range of polycyclic aromatic carbons — and their breakdown products — to understand a community's cancer risk.

Health + Wellness
People can be exposed to PAHs in a variety of ways, from smoking to eating grilled food to breathing in tailpipe or wildfire emissions. RyanJLane / E+ / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Gribkoff

Around the world, regulators have long relied on one compound to assess a community's lung cancer risk from a class of chemicals that we're exposed to while grilling burgers, waiting in traffic, and breathing in wood smoke from a fire.

That compound—benzo(a)pyrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)—however, only accounts for 11% of lung cancer risk associated with PAHs, MIT researchers found in a study published earlier this month in GeoHealth. Meanwhile, 17% of the PAH-linked cancer risk in the study came from the largely unregulated and under-studied breakdown products.

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'The nation's worst polluters managed to evade accountability and scrutiny for decades as they helped the fossil fuel industry destroy our planet.' Illustration: Jason Goad / The Guardian

By Georgia Wright, Liat Olenick and Amy Westervelt

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

For too long, Americans were fed a false narrative that they should feel individually guilty about the climate crisis. The reality is that only a handful of powerful individuals bear the personal responsibility.

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Oliver Rossi / DigitalVision / Getty Images

"Save the bees!"

You've heard this call to action before, but what's the buzz really about? Turns out, bees are incredibly important in nature and in human food production.

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Pgiam / Getty Images

Though summer is the most popular season for RV travel, fall is close behind it. Indeed, there are plenty of folks across the country who love to load up their campers and head out to witness the changing foliage, bask in cooler temperatures and herald the coming of crisp autumn air.

One of the challenges that RV owners face? How to keep their treks eco-friendly. After all, traveling by RV comes with a number of environmental challenges. RVs get low gas mileage, plus they produce more carbon emissions than flying or simply taking a car.

The good news is that, by following a few basic tips, it's possible to make your RV travels more eco-friendly. Here are some earth-conscious steps to take for your next RV adventure.

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A flooded public park. People who suffer the greatest effects of climate change have often done the least to cause them. Ngo Quan / 500px / Getty Images

By Sonja Klinsky

Climate change has hit home around the world in 2021 with record heat waves, droughts, wildfires and extreme storms. Often, the people suffering most from the effects of climate change are those who have done the least to cause it.

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Babies have more plastics in their stool samples than adults, a new study found. John Howard / DigitalVision / Getty Images

Babies haven't spent a lot of time on the planet, but apparently it's still enough time to be exposed to lots of plastic.

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Extinction Rebellion protesters join the March for Nature on Sept. 4, 2021 in London, England. Rob Pinney / Getty Images

By Lorena Gonzalez and Nate Shelter

World leaders are gathering in New York this week and next for the UN General Assembly meeting (UNGA76) and Climate Week. The two major events come at a critical moment for climate action.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Shelley's Eagle Owl. Dr Robert Williams

Shelley's eagle owls are the largest owls that live in Africa's rainforests, according to HuffPost, but they have still managed to stay well hidden.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Some of the youth petitioners who appealed to the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child for protection against climate change and its effects attended the global climate strike in Sept. 2019 in New York. Michael Rubenstein / EarthJustice

In a "stunning" and upsetting decision, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child refused to hear the case of 16 youth from around the world who are threatened by the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less
Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Illustration by Devon Gailey

With Thanksgiving and the holiday season right around the corner, we're gearing up for a period of celebration and gathering with friends and loved ones.

Holiday events and parties – like birthdays, wedding showers, graduations, anniversaries – are often quite wasteful, but don't have to be! Plan a party that's fun, festive, and sustainable.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Ikea is among the companies implementing circular economy initiatives. Visual China Group / Getty Images

By Sean Fleming

What goes around comes around, according to the old saying. And in the case of the circular economy, that's certainly true.

Read More Show Less
USDA NRCS Montana

By Dipika Kadaba

The emergence of multiple pandemics in the animal agriculture industry over the past few decades, coupled with COVID-19's suspected origins in wildlife meat markets, has prompted renewed calls from experts to transform the global food system to prevent diseases harmful to humans.

Read More Show Less
We’re Miscalculating the Cancer Risk From a Massive Class of Chemicals: MIT Study

Regulators need to look at a broader range of polycyclic aromatic carbons — and their breakdown products — to understand a community's cancer risk.

Health + Wellness
People can be exposed to PAHs in a variety of ways, from smoking to eating grilled food to breathing in tailpipe or wildfire emissions. RyanJLane / E+ / Getty Images

By Elizabeth Gribkoff

Around the world, regulators have long relied on one compound to assess a community's lung cancer risk from a class of chemicals that we're exposed to while grilling burgers, waiting in traffic, and breathing in wood smoke from a fire.

That compound—benzo(a)pyrene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)—however, only accounts for 11% of lung cancer risk associated with PAHs, MIT researchers found in a study published earlier this month in GeoHealth. Meanwhile, 17% of the PAH-linked cancer risk in the study came from the largely unregulated and under-studied breakdown products.

Read More Show Less
'The nation's worst polluters managed to evade accountability and scrutiny for decades as they helped the fossil fuel industry destroy our planet.' Illustration: Jason Goad / The Guardian

By Georgia Wright, Liat Olenick and Amy Westervelt

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story.

For too long, Americans were fed a false narrative that they should feel individually guilty about the climate crisis. The reality is that only a handful of powerful individuals bear the personal responsibility.