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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A large excavator digging for lignite (brown-coal) in an open cast mine in Germany. claffra / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Brett Wilkins

A new report published Wednesday by a trio of progressive advocacy groups lifts the veil on so-called "net zero" climate pledges, which are often touted by corporations and governments as solutions to the climate emergency, but which the paper's authors argue are merely a dangerous form of greenwashing that should be eschewed in favor of Real Zero policies based on meaningful, near-term commitments to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Reusable bags being packed at New Lynn New World supermarket in Auckland, New Zealand on July 1, 2019. Fiona Goodall / Getty Images

In its latest environmental commitment, New Zealand has announced a ban on the majority of single-use plastics by 2025.

Read More Show Less
mountain photograph
Photo by Gene Jeter on Unsplash

The majority of all Texas residents live in a deregulated energy market. This means every day, people have the freedom to switch to a different provider in their service area to save money. Competition helps keep prices down, and Texas energy rates are below the national average.

Read More Show Less


In Today's Eco Update

  • Keystone XL is dead.
  • Revived Siberian microorganism.
  • The Big Con.
  • Record CO2 emissions.
  • Dr. Bronner's chocolate.

– summaries below written by Angely Mercado

The Keystone XL Pipeline Is Officially Dead

The Keystone XL pipeline is officially canceled.

TC Energy, the Canadian company behind the pipeline that would have moved oil from Alberta's tar sands to Nebraska, confirmed Wednesday that it was giving up on the controversial project.

"The Company will continue to coordinate with regulators, stakeholders and Indigenous groups to meet its environmental and regulatory commitments and ensure a safe termination of and exit from the Project," the company wrote.

The news was met with jubilation from environmental and Indigenous groups who had spent years battling the project over concerns it would worsen the climate crisis and harm the ecosystems and communities along its route.

Olivia Rosane

24,000-Year-Old Microorganism Revived From Permafrost

Scientists in Russia have revived a bdelloid rotifer — a multicellular microorganism found in wet environments — after the invertebrate spent 24,000 years frozen 11 feet beneath the Siberian permafrost.

According to a study published in Current Biology, research has suggested these tiny creatures can slow their metabolisms down to almost stagnant and survive frozen for up to 10 years. Scientists from the Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science found that rotifers can survive for much longer. The 24,000-year-old rotifer was able to reproduce and feed after being thawed.

Report Details Fossil Fuel Industry's Deceptive 'Net Zero' Strategy

A new report published by a trio of progressive advocacy groups unveiled the so called "net zero" climate pledges, which are often touted by corporations and governments as solutions to the climate emergency. The report's authors argued that it's simply a form of greenwashing that should be eschewed in favor of Real Zero policies based on meaningful, near-term commitments to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions.

The report, The Big Con: How Big Polluters Are Advancing a "Net Zero" Climate Agenda to Delay, Deceive, and Deny, was published by Corporate Accountability, the Global Forest Coalition, and Friends of the Earth International, and is endorsed by more than 60 environmental organizations.

CO2 Reaches Its Highest Level in Human History

Last month, EcoWatch reported that atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels this year were expected to climb to beyond 2019 levels, despite falling during the pandemic. Two reports released earlier this week detailed that CO2 levels have indeed spiked, and that the annual peak reached 419 parts per million (PPM) in May, the highest level in human history.

Researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), who published the reports, have tracked atmospheric CO2 for more than 60 years. But using other data, researchers were able to estimate that CO2 levels haven't been this high on Earth in more than 4 million years.

Dr. Bronner's to Launch Vegan, Organic Chocolate Bars

Dr. Bronner's, a popular natural soap brand, is releasing Dr. Bronner's Magic All-One Chocolate this Aug. 1 and will sell its product online by the fall. The dairy-free chocolate will come in six different flavors: roasted whole hazelnuts, crunchy hazelnut butter, salted whole almonds, salted almond butter, salted dark chocolate and smooth coconut praline. The bars will be made from cocoa grown through regenerative organic practices, and are made with lower-glycemic coconut sugar.

The push to produce chocolate began when Dr. Bronner's learned that the Ghanian farmers who supply its Regenerative Organic Certified Serendipalm also grow cocoa and decided to expand the partnership. The company's farming partners use dynamic agroforestry, a farming method used by Indigenous peoples of Latin America. Dynamic agroforestry creates "forest-like systems with high biomass production," according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

In addition to being certified USDA organic and vegan, the chocolate is a certified fair trade product.

Trending
Crayfish are an important part of freshwater ecosystems, and change their behavior when exposed to antidepressants. Nick9002

Antidepressants are designed to make humans feel better, but they can have a surprising impact on non-human animals when they enter the environment.

Read More Show Less
Photo by Dino Reichmuth on Unsplash

Plastic Free July lands smack in the middle of vacation season, and this year, my summer plans included leaving North Carolina and driving through four cities in Florida to spend some time in the humidity sun. The challenge was: Could I really carry out a plastic-free road trip?

With a lot of planning and even more improvising, I was able to significantly cut down my waste and successfully avoid single-use plastic throughout the entire journey. Here, I'll share the best tips I learned and a few items to pack if you're embarking on your own plastic-free road trip.

Disclaimer: If you want to take it a step further and have a zero-waste road trip, you may need to adjust some of the following tips.

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

Read More Show Less
Organizing local cleanups is one way toward becoming a local activist. ljubaphoto / Getty Images

By Jenny Shalant

If you're new to hometown activism, now is the time to get a few pointers. To start, recognize that no matter how small they seem, local actions matter. Remember the famous words of Margaret Mead: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has."

Read More Show Less
The miserable ones: Young broiler chickens at a feeder. The poor treatment of the chickens within its supply chain has made Tyson the target of public campaigns urging the company to make meaningful changes. U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

By David Coman-Hidy

The actions of the U.S. meat industry throughout the pandemic have brought to light the true corruption and waste that are inherent within our food system. Despite a new wave of rising COVID-19 cases, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently submitted a proposal to further increase "the maximum slaughter line speed by 25 percent," which was already far too fast and highly dangerous. It has been made evident that the industry will exploit its workers and animals all to boost its profit.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Micheile Henderson / Unsplash

For those looking for a quick and convenient way to eat delicious, hearty meals with little to no hassle, there are plenty of meal kit delivery services to choose from. But out of all of the brands available, which is the best meal delivery service for the environment? We review the top eco-friendly meal kit services and discuss what makes a meal delivery service sustainable.

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Vesnaandjic / iStock / Getty Images

When hunger strikes, it's best to assume you're going to eat whatever is in easy reach. That's a good thing if you've planned ahead with healthy snack options but can spell disaster for your health goals if you only have junk food around. And this can be especially hard if you follow a vegetarian diet.

Thankfully, it's easier than you might think to ensure that you have lots of healthy vegetarian snack options around. With things like eco-friendly meal kit delivery services and plant-based protein powders, there are so many great choices out there. Here are our choices for the ten best snacks for vegetarians to stave off hunger and our recommendations of the best brands with healthy snacks made from real food.

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Trending
"It would be great to see all the candidates join Elizabeth Warren in taking the No Big Ag Money Pledge," said Citizens Regeneration Lobby's Alexis Baden-Mayer. Peter Blanchard / Flickr / ric (CC BY 2.0)

By Andrea Germanos

Food system justice and environmental advocates on Wednesday urged all Democratic presidential hopefuls to follow in the footsteps of Sen. Elizabeth Warren in signing a pledge rejecting campaign cash from food and agribusiness corporations.

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Carol Yepes / Moment / Getty Images

Although it's convenient, single-waste plastic is plaguing our planet. Thankfully, some people are looking to reduce their plastic consumption. If you're one of them, you may face a crossroads with the complicated plastic razor.

Though not categorized as "single-use," billions of plastic razors end up in landfills each year. Razors are sharp objects that can't be recycled because they're made from mixed materials. A standard disposable plastic razor is good for three to 10 shaves before it gets blunt, and clogged — then off to the landfill, it goes. Additionally, constantly purchasing new razors means more waste created from plastic and cardboard packaging.

Read More Show Less
Researchers in Greenland found alarming amounts of dissolved mercury in glaciers.

By Isabela Martel

When British environmental geochemist Jon Hawkings arrived in Greenland for the first time in 2012, he was impressed.

"It's mind-blowing: You look onto the horizon and it's just ice and it goes on for 150, 200 kilometers at least."

He went to the Arctic with a group of international scientists. Their goal was to investigate the relationship between nutrients entering coastal ecosystems from glacial meltwater. But the group's research took an unexpected turn.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
A large excavator digging for lignite (brown-coal) in an open cast mine in Germany. claffra / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Brett Wilkins

A new report published Wednesday by a trio of progressive advocacy groups lifts the veil on so-called "net zero" climate pledges, which are often touted by corporations and governments as solutions to the climate emergency, but which the paper's authors argue are merely a dangerous form of greenwashing that should be eschewed in favor of Real Zero policies based on meaningful, near-term commitments to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Reusable bags being packed at New Lynn New World supermarket in Auckland, New Zealand on July 1, 2019. Fiona Goodall / Getty Images

In its latest environmental commitment, New Zealand has announced a ban on the majority of single-use plastics by 2025.

Read More Show Less
mountain photograph
Photo by Gene Jeter on Unsplash

The majority of all Texas residents live in a deregulated energy market. This means every day, people have the freedom to switch to a different provider in their service area to save money. Competition helps keep prices down, and Texas energy rates are below the national average.

Read More Show Less


In Today's Eco Update

  • Keystone XL is dead.
  • Revived Siberian microorganism.
  • The Big Con.
  • Record CO2 emissions.
  • Dr. Bronner's chocolate.

– summaries below written by Angely Mercado

The Keystone XL Pipeline Is Officially Dead

The Keystone XL pipeline is officially canceled.

TC Energy, the Canadian company behind the pipeline that would have moved oil from Alberta's tar sands to Nebraska, confirmed Wednesday that it was giving up on the controversial project.

"The Company will continue to coordinate with regulators, stakeholders and Indigenous groups to meet its environmental and regulatory commitments and ensure a safe termination of and exit from the Project," the company wrote.

The news was met with jubilation from environmental and Indigenous groups who had spent years battling the project over concerns it would worsen the climate crisis and harm the ecosystems and communities along its route.

Olivia Rosane

24,000-Year-Old Microorganism Revived From Permafrost

Scientists in Russia have revived a bdelloid rotifer — a multicellular microorganism found in wet environments — after the invertebrate spent 24,000 years frozen 11 feet beneath the Siberian permafrost.

According to a study published in Current Biology, research has suggested these tiny creatures can slow their metabolisms down to almost stagnant and survive frozen for up to 10 years. Scientists from the Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science found that rotifers can survive for much longer. The 24,000-year-old rotifer was able to reproduce and feed after being thawed.

Report Details Fossil Fuel Industry's Deceptive 'Net Zero' Strategy

A new report published by a trio of progressive advocacy groups unveiled the so called "net zero" climate pledges, which are often touted by corporations and governments as solutions to the climate emergency. The report's authors argued that it's simply a form of greenwashing that should be eschewed in favor of Real Zero policies based on meaningful, near-term commitments to reducing global greenhouse gas emissions.

The report, The Big Con: How Big Polluters Are Advancing a "Net Zero" Climate Agenda to Delay, Deceive, and Deny, was published by Corporate Accountability, the Global Forest Coalition, and Friends of the Earth International, and is endorsed by more than 60 environmental organizations.

CO2 Reaches Its Highest Level in Human History

Last month, EcoWatch reported that atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels this year were expected to climb to beyond 2019 levels, despite falling during the pandemic. Two reports released earlier this week detailed that CO2 levels have indeed spiked, and that the annual peak reached 419 parts per million (PPM) in May, the highest level in human history.

Researchers from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), who published the reports, have tracked atmospheric CO2 for more than 60 years. But using other data, researchers were able to estimate that CO2 levels haven't been this high on Earth in more than 4 million years.

Dr. Bronner's to Launch Vegan, Organic Chocolate Bars

Dr. Bronner's, a popular natural soap brand, is releasing Dr. Bronner's Magic All-One Chocolate this Aug. 1 and will sell its product online by the fall. The dairy-free chocolate will come in six different flavors: roasted whole hazelnuts, crunchy hazelnut butter, salted whole almonds, salted almond butter, salted dark chocolate and smooth coconut praline. The bars will be made from cocoa grown through regenerative organic practices, and are made with lower-glycemic coconut sugar.

The push to produce chocolate began when Dr. Bronner's learned that the Ghanian farmers who supply its Regenerative Organic Certified Serendipalm also grow cocoa and decided to expand the partnership. The company's farming partners use dynamic agroforestry, a farming method used by Indigenous peoples of Latin America. Dynamic agroforestry creates "forest-like systems with high biomass production," according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

In addition to being certified USDA organic and vegan, the chocolate is a certified fair trade product.

Trending
Crayfish are an important part of freshwater ecosystems, and change their behavior when exposed to antidepressants. Nick9002

Antidepressants are designed to make humans feel better, but they can have a surprising impact on non-human animals when they enter the environment.

Read More Show Less
Photo by Dino Reichmuth on Unsplash

Plastic Free July lands smack in the middle of vacation season, and this year, my summer plans included leaving North Carolina and driving through four cities in Florida to spend some time in the humidity sun. The challenge was: Could I really carry out a plastic-free road trip?

With a lot of planning and even more improvising, I was able to significantly cut down my waste and successfully avoid single-use plastic throughout the entire journey. Here, I'll share the best tips I learned and a few items to pack if you're embarking on your own plastic-free road trip.

Disclaimer: If you want to take it a step further and have a zero-waste road trip, you may need to adjust some of the following tips.

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

Read More Show Less
Organizing local cleanups is one way toward becoming a local activist. ljubaphoto / Getty Images

By Jenny Shalant

If you're new to hometown activism, now is the time to get a few pointers. To start, recognize that no matter how small they seem, local actions matter. Remember the famous words of Margaret Mead: "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has."

Read More Show Less
The miserable ones: Young broiler chickens at a feeder. The poor treatment of the chickens within its supply chain has made Tyson the target of public campaigns urging the company to make meaningful changes. U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr

By David Coman-Hidy

The actions of the U.S. meat industry throughout the pandemic have brought to light the true corruption and waste that are inherent within our food system. Despite a new wave of rising COVID-19 cases, the U.S. Department of Agriculture recently submitted a proposal to further increase "the maximum slaughter line speed by 25 percent," which was already far too fast and highly dangerous. It has been made evident that the industry will exploit its workers and animals all to boost its profit.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Micheile Henderson / Unsplash