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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Matteo Farinella

Art by Matteo Farinella, written by Jeremy Deaton

Algal blooms are killing wildlife and making people sick. Here's how we aided their reign of terror.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
© Andy Carter / DeSmog

By Rich Collett-White and Rachel Sherrington

Fossil fuel companies could face legal challenges over their misleading advertising, after a DeSmog investigation uncovered the extent of their "greenwashing."

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Madeleine_Steinbach / iStock / Getty Images

Krill oil has gained a lot of popularity recently as a superior alternative to fish oil. Basically, the claim goes, anything fish oil can do, krill oil does better. Read on to learn what makes krill oil supplements better than fish oil supplements, why you should consider these vitamin supplements, and which brands we recommend.

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The Sydney Opera House has had an Environmental Sustainability Plan in place since 2010. Johnny Bhalla / Unsplash

Coronavirus and the climate crisis are inspiring change at some of the most traditional venues in the world: opera houses.

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Trending
The Australian brewery Young Henrys is working to fight climate change with algae. Young Henrys

By Josh Bonifield

The Australian brewery Young Henrys is working to fight climate change with an unusual ingredient—algae.

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A 2017 study found that half of Los Angeles sushi was not what it claimed to be. d3sign / Getty Images

How can you tell that the fish on your plate is the real thing? You can't — and that's the problem.

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A flooded corn field along the Yazoo River during the Mississippi River near Redwood, Mississippi in May of 2011.
T. C. Knight / Getty Images

By Chaoqun Lu

Some effects of extreme weather are visible – like half a million acres of flattened corn in Iowa left behind after a derecho that hit the Midwestern United States on Aug. 10.

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A diver looks at the coral reefs of the Society Islands in French Polynesia on May 9, 2019 in Moorea, French Polynesia. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

Coral reef ecosystems are threatened, researchers have warned. Warming oceans, pollution and overfishing are a few reasons why.

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seed.com

You can't discount the importance of your gut health. Research shows that the microbiome within your digestive system has a disproportionate impact on how well your whole body functions.

Unfortunately, bad diets, the overuse of antibiotics, and other stressors mean many of our digestive systems are in trouble. Probiotic supplements claim to solve this problem by replenishing your gut with the healthy bacteria it needs for optimal functioning. Here, we'll analyze the popular probiotic brand Seed to determine whether its supplements are worth taking.

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The western edge of the Greenland ice sheet in West Greenland as seen from the air. Ashley Cooper / Getty Images

As the world's ice sheets melt at an increasing rate, researchers are looking for explanations beyond just a hotter climate. A recent study found one answer may lie in the dust.

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Drone surveillance reveals just how big a contribution sea cucumbers make to reef habitats. treetstreet / iStock / Getty Images

By Hannah Thomasy

On its own, a single sea cucumber may not be very impressive. But get enough of these floppy, faceless creatures together, and they—or, more specifically, their poop—can physically and biochemically reshape a coral reef habitat.

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A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

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These slugs can remove their bodies from their heads and grow new bodies. Live Science / YouTube

A Ph.D. student at Nara Women's University in Japan was spending an ordinary day in the lab when she noticed something unusual.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Matteo Farinella

Art by Matteo Farinella, written by Jeremy Deaton

Algal blooms are killing wildlife and making people sick. Here's how we aided their reign of terror.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
© Andy Carter / DeSmog

By Rich Collett-White and Rachel Sherrington

Fossil fuel companies could face legal challenges over their misleading advertising, after a DeSmog investigation uncovered the extent of their "greenwashing."

Read More Show Less
Madeleine_Steinbach / iStock / Getty Images

Krill oil has gained a lot of popularity recently as a superior alternative to fish oil. Basically, the claim goes, anything fish oil can do, krill oil does better. Read on to learn what makes krill oil supplements better than fish oil supplements, why you should consider these vitamin supplements, and which brands we recommend.

Read More Show Less
The Sydney Opera House has had an Environmental Sustainability Plan in place since 2010. Johnny Bhalla / Unsplash

Coronavirus and the climate crisis are inspiring change at some of the most traditional venues in the world: opera houses.

Read More Show Less
Trending
The Australian brewery Young Henrys is working to fight climate change with algae. Young Henrys

By Josh Bonifield

The Australian brewery Young Henrys is working to fight climate change with an unusual ingredient—algae.

Read More Show Less
A 2017 study found that half of Los Angeles sushi was not what it claimed to be. d3sign / Getty Images

How can you tell that the fish on your plate is the real thing? You can't — and that's the problem.

Read More Show Less
A flooded corn field along the Yazoo River during the Mississippi River near Redwood, Mississippi in May of 2011.
T. C. Knight / Getty Images

By Chaoqun Lu

Some effects of extreme weather are visible – like half a million acres of flattened corn in Iowa left behind after a derecho that hit the Midwestern United States on Aug. 10.

Read More Show Less