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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Anthony Quintano / CC BY 2.0

By Rich Collett-White

Facebook is "fuelling climate misinformation" through its failure to get to grips with misleading content, according to a new report that calls on companies to boycott the platform until significant action is taken.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

On Saturday, March 27, people around the world will celebrate the annual Earth Hour, albeit in a slightly different way.

This annual tradition, first launched by World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and its partners in Sydney in 2007, involves participants from more than 180 countries switching off their lights on the last Saturday in March in order to call attention to the climate crisis and biodiversity loss. This year, the organizers are adding something extra: a virtual spotlight that can be shined on the Earth by sharing their video.

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Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

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A lone tree stands in the Amazon rainforest near Santarem, Para state, Brazil, on September 4, 2019. Nelson Almeida / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

New data from a Norwegian nonprofit is generating fresh concerns about humanity's destruction of the natural world, revealing Monday that people have ravaged about two-thirds of original tropical rainforest cover globally.

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Trending
Activists rally on Jan. 19, 2021 in New York City to demand that U.S. President Joe Biden take immediate executive action to "Build Back Fossil Free." Lev Radin / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

While President Joe Biden's top climate envoy John Kerry told world leaders at a virtual climate summit that the U.S. will fulfill its commitment to provide financial support to developing countries as they grapple with the deadly consequences of a warming planet, campaigners are urging the U.S. to follow the lead of European Union officials who on Monday pledged to stop subsidizing fossil fuels and instead invest in a just transition toward clean energy.

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We Can't Defuse the Climate Crisis Without Tougher, Louder News Coverage

At COP26, some US newsrooms are finally stepping up — but will it last?

Insights + Opinion
President Joe Biden addresses a press conference at the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow on November 2, 2021. Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP

Mark Hertsgaard

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. The author is CCNow's co-founder and executive director.

Some of the best news out of Glasgow so far is that the U.S. media is finally paying serious attention to the climate crisis. We'll see if it lasts, now that U.S. President Joe Biden and other world leaders have left for home. Indeed, by Wednesday, the third day of the UN COP26 climate conference, U.S. mainstream news coverage was starting to diminish. But it's usually during the second, closing week of these conferences that the key agreements are or are not reached, so the true test is what comes next.

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A wind-solar hybrid photovoltaic power station on Sept. 12, 2020 in Zaozhuang, Shandong Province of China. Li Zongxian / VCG via Getty Images

A group of governments and the private sector on Friday collectively promised more than $400 billion (just over €340 billion) at a high-level summit that called for more urgent action to curb catastrophic climate change.

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Climate change activists dressed as world leaders pose for a photograph during a demonstration in Glasgow on Nov. 9, 2021, during the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference. ANDY BUCHANAN / AFP via Getty Images

The largest delegation at COP26 represents the fossil fuel industry that profits from the climate crisis, according to an analysis from Global Witness.

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Trending
Climate activists gather for the Global Day of Action for Climate Justice march on Nov. 6, 2021 in Glasgow, Scotland. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

A new COP26 draft decision text unveiled Wednesday was roundly panned by climate campaigners as badly inadequate to the task of slashing global greenhouse gas emissions, which are pushing the planet toward a catastrophic 2.4°C of warming by the end of the century.

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Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks at an Oceans Plastics Event at United Nations Environment Program in Nairobi, Kenya, on Nov. 18, 2021. ANDREW HARNIK / POOL / AFP via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In stark contrast to the U.S. position under former President Donald Trump, the Biden administration on Thursday signaled support for developing a global treaty to tackle marine plastic pollution, winning swift applause from environmental campaigners.

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Trending
A mural painted near the COP26 meeting in Glasgow. Jeff J Mitchell / Getty Images

The 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) — the most important international climate conference since the one that resulted in the Paris agreement more than five years ago — began in Glasgow Sunday.

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Kunming Declaration: Nature Defenders Warn Global Biodiversity Pledge Lacks Urgency

While welcoming a pledge by more than 100 countries to make "transformative change," conservationists say governments must turn "words into reality."

Animals
Red pandas are listed as endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List. Mathias Appel / Flickr

By Jessica Corbett

More than 100 countries on Wednesday concluded a round of negotiations on global efforts to restore and protect the variety of life on Earth by pledging "urgent and integrated action" to achieve "transformative change, across all sectors of the economy and all parts of society."

While conservation advocacy groups worldwide welcomed the "Kunming Declaration" on biodiversity, they also made clear that its 17 specific commitments must be met with immediate, bold, and concrete steps to fully address the existential crisis the natural world now faces from human activity.

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The youth-led Mock COP26 virtual conference concluded Tuesday with a treaty they hope world leaders will sign ahead of the official COP26 in November 2021.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Anthony Quintano / CC BY 2.0

By Rich Collett-White

Facebook is "fuelling climate misinformation" through its failure to get to grips with misleading content, according to a new report that calls on companies to boycott the platform until significant action is taken.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

On Saturday, March 27, people around the world will celebrate the annual Earth Hour, albeit in a slightly different way.

This annual tradition, first launched by World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and its partners in Sydney in 2007, involves participants from more than 180 countries switching off their lights on the last Saturday in March in order to call attention to the climate crisis and biodiversity loss. This year, the organizers are adding something extra: a virtual spotlight that can be shined on the Earth by sharing their video.

Read More Show Less
Prostock-Studio / iStock / Getty Images

We had a lot of questions when we heard that Hallmark was releasing 41 Christmas movies this year alone. First off, how? Secondly, do I have the time to watch them all? Do I have the energy to watch all 41 (mentally and physically) so as not to miss out on this timeless holiday tradition? How much electricity would that even require?

With the holidays approaching, we thought you might like the answer to the question us solar nerds are asking: how many solar panels does it take to watch a Hallmark Christmas movie?

Don't celebrate Christmas or watch Hallmark movies? Fret not. This framework can help you understand the amount of power it takes to watch any movie, TV show, sports game or even provide electricity to your entire home.

Read More Show Less
A lone tree stands in the Amazon rainforest near Santarem, Para state, Brazil, on September 4, 2019. Nelson Almeida / AFP / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

New data from a Norwegian nonprofit is generating fresh concerns about humanity's destruction of the natural world, revealing Monday that people have ravaged about two-thirds of original tropical rainforest cover globally.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Activists rally on Jan. 19, 2021 in New York City to demand that U.S. President Joe Biden take immediate executive action to "Build Back Fossil Free." Lev Radin / Pacific Press / LightRocket via Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

While President Joe Biden's top climate envoy John Kerry told world leaders at a virtual climate summit that the U.S. will fulfill its commitment to provide financial support to developing countries as they grapple with the deadly consequences of a warming planet, campaigners are urging the U.S. to follow the lead of European Union officials who on Monday pledged to stop subsidizing fossil fuels and instead invest in a just transition toward clean energy.

Read More Show Less
We Can't Defuse the Climate Crisis Without Tougher, Louder News Coverage

At COP26, some US newsrooms are finally stepping up — but will it last?

Insights + Opinion
President Joe Biden addresses a press conference at the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference in Glasgow on November 2, 2021. Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP

Mark Hertsgaard

This story is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration strengthening coverage of the climate story. The author is CCNow's co-founder and executive director.

Some of the best news out of Glasgow so far is that the U.S. media is finally paying serious attention to the climate crisis. We'll see if it lasts, now that U.S. President Joe Biden and other world leaders have left for home. Indeed, by Wednesday, the third day of the UN COP26 climate conference, U.S. mainstream news coverage was starting to diminish. But it's usually during the second, closing week of these conferences that the key agreements are or are not reached, so the true test is what comes next.

Read More Show Less
A wind-solar hybrid photovoltaic power station on Sept. 12, 2020 in Zaozhuang, Shandong Province of China. Li Zongxian / VCG via Getty Images

A group of governments and the private sector on Friday collectively promised more than $400 billion (just over €340 billion) at a high-level summit that called for more urgent action to curb catastrophic climate change.

Read More Show Less
Climate change activists dressed as world leaders pose for a photograph during a demonstration in Glasgow on Nov. 9, 2021, during the COP26 UN Climate Change Conference. ANDY BUCHANAN / AFP via Getty Images

The largest delegation at COP26 represents the fossil fuel industry that profits from the climate crisis, according to an analysis from Global Witness.

Read More Show Less
Trending