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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
People hold signs calling for President Joe Biden to support a Green New Deal and end his support of pipelines and the fossil fuel industry in St. Paul on January 29, 2021. Tim Evans / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

For the Biden Administration to meet its long-term target of net-zero emissions by 2050, the United States must reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by roughly 60% below 2005 levels by 2030, according to a new report released Thursday.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A new report urges immediate climate action to control global warming. John W Banagan / Getty Images

A new report promoting urgent climate action in Australia has stirred debate for claiming that global temperatures will rise past 1.5 degrees Celsius in the next decade.

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waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

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Pexels

By Mark McCord

  • An academic paper suggests key tipping points can significantly reduce carbon emissions, which would help to slow global warming.
  • Government policies are making coal uneconomical.
  • Electric vehicle pricing structures have helped reduce the number of petrol and diesel cars on the world's roads.

There may be light at the end of the tunnel in the battle to reduce carbon emissions.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Ninety percent of electricity would have to come from renewable sources, mainly sun and wind, to stay in line with climate targets. yangphoto / Getty Images

By Gero Rueter

Proven technologies for a net-zero energy system already largely exist today, according to a report published Tuesday by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The report predicts that renewable power, green hydrogen and modern bioenergy will shape the way we power the world in 2050.

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Sweltering heat in New Delhi, India reached almost 39 degrees Celsius (102 degrees Fahrenheit) on June 25, 2017. Saumya Khandelwal / Hindustan Times via Getty Images

If governments fail to keep global temperatures within 1.5 degrees Celsius of pre-industrial levels, much of the world's population could live in "lethal" levels of heat and humidity, new research finds.

Read More Show Less
The Great Barrier Reef at Whitsunday Island, Australia. Daniel Osterkamp / Getty Images

The world's oceans and coastal ecosystems can store remarkable amounts of carbon dioxide. But if they're damaged, they can also release massive amounts of emissions back into the atmosphere.

Read More Show Less
Researchers have determined that U.S. climate goals will not be met without federal leadership. Another Believer / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

After President Trump announced that the U.S. will exit the Paris Climate Agreement, many U.S. states, cities, and businesses stepped up with their own commitments to cut carbon pollution.

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Trending
The Crystal building in London, England is the first building in the world to be awarded an outstanding BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) rating and a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum rating. Alphotographic / Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

We spend 90% of our time in the buildings where we live and work, shop and conduct business, in the structures that keep us warm in winter and cool in summer.

But immense energy is required to source and manufacture building materials, to power construction sites, to maintain and renew the built environment. In 2019, building operations and construction activities together accounted for 38% of global energy-related CO2 emissions, the highest level ever recorded.

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President-elect Joe Biden gestures to the crowd after delivering remarks in Wilmington, Delaware, on November 7, 2020. Angela Weiss / AFP / Getty Images

If President-elect Joe Biden follows through on his plan to combat the climate crisis, it could put the world "within striking distance" of meeting the Paris agreement goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

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Trending
New study finds worst-case global sea level rise projections will occur unless immediate action is taken. Kazi Salahuddin Razu / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

A new study from Australian and Chinese researchers adds weight to scientists' warnings from recent United Nations reports about how sea levels are expected to rise dangerously in the coming decades because of human activity that's driving global heating.

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Empty freeways, such as this one in LA, were a common sight during COVID-19 lockdowns in spring 2020. vlvart / Getty Images

Lockdown measures to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic had the added benefit of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by around seven percent, or 2.6 billion metric tons, in 2020.

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Jerome Powell (R) takes the oath of office as he is sworn-in as the new chairman of the Federal Reserve (FED) by Randal Quarles (L) vice chair for supervision, at the Federal Reserve Building in Washington, DC on Feb. 5, 2018. SAUL LOEB / AFP via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

In a decision seen by some as a subtle acknowledgement of President-elect Joe Biden's victory even as President Donald Trump still refuses to concede, the Federal Reserve has applied to join what Bloomberg called "the climate change club for central banks," a group that requires participation in the Paris climate agreement.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
People hold signs calling for President Joe Biden to support a Green New Deal and end his support of pipelines and the fossil fuel industry in St. Paul on January 29, 2021. Tim Evans / NurPhoto / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

For the Biden Administration to meet its long-term target of net-zero emissions by 2050, the United States must reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by roughly 60% below 2005 levels by 2030, according to a new report released Thursday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
A new report urges immediate climate action to control global warming. John W Banagan / Getty Images

A new report promoting urgent climate action in Australia has stirred debate for claiming that global temperatures will rise past 1.5 degrees Celsius in the next decade.

Read More Show Less
waterlust.com / @tulasendlesssummer_sierra .

Each product featured here has been independently selected by the writer. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

The bright patterns and recognizable designs of Waterlust's activewear aren't just for show. In fact, they're meant to promote the conversation around sustainability and give back to the ocean science and conservation community.

Each design is paired with a research lab, nonprofit, or education organization that has high intellectual merit and the potential to move the needle in its respective field. For each product sold, Waterlust donates 10% of profits to these conservation partners.

Read More Show Less
Pexels

By Mark McCord

  • An academic paper suggests key tipping points can significantly reduce carbon emissions, which would help to slow global warming.
  • Government policies are making coal uneconomical.
  • Electric vehicle pricing structures have helped reduce the number of petrol and diesel cars on the world's roads.

There may be light at the end of the tunnel in the battle to reduce carbon emissions.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Ninety percent of electricity would have to come from renewable sources, mainly sun and wind, to stay in line with climate targets. yangphoto / Getty Images

By Gero Rueter

Proven technologies for a net-zero energy system already largely exist today, according to a report published Tuesday by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The report predicts that renewable power, green hydrogen and modern bioenergy will shape the way we power the world in 2050.

Read More Show Less
Sweltering heat in New Delhi, India reached almost 39 degrees Celsius (102 degrees Fahrenheit) on June 25, 2017. Saumya Khandelwal / Hindustan Times via Getty Images

If governments fail to keep global temperatures within 1.5 degrees Celsius of pre-industrial levels, much of the world's population could live in "lethal" levels of heat and humidity, new research finds.

Read More Show Less
The Great Barrier Reef at Whitsunday Island, Australia. Daniel Osterkamp / Getty Images

The world's oceans and coastal ecosystems can store remarkable amounts of carbon dioxide. But if they're damaged, they can also release massive amounts of emissions back into the atmosphere.

Read More Show Less
Researchers have determined that U.S. climate goals will not be met without federal leadership. Another Believer / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

After President Trump announced that the U.S. will exit the Paris Climate Agreement, many U.S. states, cities, and businesses stepped up with their own commitments to cut carbon pollution.

Read More Show Less
Trending
The Crystal building in London, England is the first building in the world to be awarded an outstanding BREEAM (BRE Environmental Assessment Method) rating and a LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) platinum rating. Alphotographic / Getty Images

By Stuart Braun

We spend 90% of our time in the buildings where we live and work, shop and conduct business, in the structures that keep us warm in winter and cool in summer.

But immense energy is required to source and manufacture building materials, to power construction sites, to maintain and renew the built environment. In 2019, building operations and construction activities together accounted for 38% of global energy-related CO2 emissions, the highest level ever recorded.