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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Newly constructed buildings on Hulhumale, an artificial island built up to 10 feet above sea level in anticipation of rising seas, on Dec. 13, 2019 in Male, Maldives. Carl Court / Getty Images

Some of the nations most vulnerable to the climate crisis are calling for an "emergency pact" to limit global temperature rise.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Rock climber Alex Honnold joins Ando in advocating for sustainable banking. Ando
World-renowned rock climber Alex Honnold, famous for his free ascent of Yosemite's El Capitan's 3,000-foot sheer rock face in Free Solo, has found his next "mountainous" challenge: the climate crisis.
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andresr / E+ / Getty Images

From bamboo utensils to bamboo toothbrushes, household products made from bamboo are becoming more popular every year. If you have allergies, neck pain or wake up constantly to flip your pillow to the cold side, bamboo pillows have the potential to help you sleep peacefully through the night.

In this article, we'll explain the benefits of bamboo pillows and how they can help you on your journey to better sleep. We'll also recommend a few of the best pillows on the market so you can choose new bedding that's right for you.

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Hundreds of Thousands Take to Streets Worldwide for 'Uproot the System' Climate Strikes

"It's even more urgent now than it was before," said Greta Thunberg.

Politics
Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks at a large-scale climate strike march by Fridays for Future in front of the Reichstag on Sept. 24, 2021 in Berlin, Germany. Maja Hitij / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Young people by the hundreds of thousands took to the streets across the globe on Friday to deliver a resounding message to world leaders: The climate crisis is getting worse, and only radical action will be enough to avert catastrophe and secure a just, sustainable future for all.

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Extensive meetings in preparation for IPCC's Sixth Assessment Report have been happening online. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change / YouTube

By Kenny Stancil

Amid an ongoing wave of extreme weather disasters and ahead of a major United Nations climate conference this fall, top scientists from nearly 200 countries began meeting Monday to finalize a landmark report detailing how the fossil fuel-driven climate emergency is already wreaking havoc around the globe and what society must do to avert its most catastrophic consequences.

Read More Show Less
The U.S. has officially reentered the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change. Ting Shen / Xinhua / Getty Images

The United States officially reenters the Paris agreement today, a symbolic and important step toward the aggressive action required to stem the tide of climate change.

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A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district in Lower Saxony, Germany. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

The International Energy Agency warned Tuesday that global carbon dioxide emissions are on track to soar to record levels in 2023 — and continue rising thereafter — as governments fail to make adequate investments in green energy and end their dedication to planet-warming fossil fuels.

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Climate activists with Stop the Money Pipeline hold a rally in midtown Manhattan on March 3, 2021. Erik McGregor / LightRocket via Getty Images

The world's biggest banks gave fossil fuel companies $3.8 trillion in financing in the years following the Paris agreement, according to a new report.

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Trending
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres delivers a video speech at the high-level meeting of the 46th session of the United Nations Human Rights Council UNHRC in Geneva, Switzerland on Feb. 22, 2021. Xinhua / Zhang Cheng via Getty Images

By Anke Rasper

"Today's interim report from the UNFCCC is a red alert for our planet," said UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.

The report, released Friday, looks at the national climate efforts of 75 states that have already submitted their updated "nationally determined contributions," or NDCs. The countries included in the report are responsible for about 30% of the world's global greenhouse gas emissions.

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Extinction Rebellion environmental activists wearing masks of G7 leaders protest on the beach in St Ives, Cornwall during the G7 summit on June 13, 2021. DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP via Getty Images

By Jon Queally

Anti-poverty groups, climate campaigners, and public health experts reacted with outrage and howls of disappointment Sunday after the G7 leaders who spent the weekend at a summit in Cornwall, England issued a final communique that critics said represents an extreme abdication of responsibility in the face of the world's most pressing and intertwined crises — savage economic inequality, a rapidly-heating planet, and the deadly COVID-19 pandemic.

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Climate activists protest against Exxon Mobil outside the New York State Supreme Court building on Oct. 22, 2019 in New York City. ANGELA WEISS / AFP via Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

In a historic rebuke of fossil fuel giant ExxonMobil, shareholders on Wednesday voted to elect at least two people to the company's board of directors who were backed by activist investors eager to accelerate the transition to clean energy.

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A hiker walks along winding channels carved by water on the surface of the melting Longyearbreen glacier during a summer heatwave on Svalbard archipelago on July 31, 2020 near Longyearbyen, Norway. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

By Kenny Stancil

Over the past five decades, the Arctic has warmed three times faster than the world as a whole, leading to rapid and widespread melting of ice and other far-reaching consequences that are important not only to local communities and ecosystems but to the fate of life on planet Earth.

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Ekom Waterfall in a rainforest in Cameroon, Africa. antoineede / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Aptly called, "Earth's lungs," the planet's two largest swaths of rainforest, in Amazonia and Africa, suck up 15 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions produced by humans. These ecosystems are essential for carbon sequestration and therefore curbing climate change, and while the Amazon rainforest has been the subject of mountains of research, scientists are just now beginning to understand how rainforests in Central and Western Africa respond to small changes in climate — and it's good news.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Newly constructed buildings on Hulhumale, an artificial island built up to 10 feet above sea level in anticipation of rising seas, on Dec. 13, 2019 in Male, Maldives. Carl Court / Getty Images

Some of the nations most vulnerable to the climate crisis are calling for an "emergency pact" to limit global temperature rise.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Rock climber Alex Honnold joins Ando in advocating for sustainable banking. Ando
World-renowned rock climber Alex Honnold, famous for his free ascent of Yosemite's El Capitan's 3,000-foot sheer rock face in Free Solo, has found his next "mountainous" challenge: the climate crisis.
Read More Show Less
andresr / E+ / Getty Images

From bamboo utensils to bamboo toothbrushes, household products made from bamboo are becoming more popular every year. If you have allergies, neck pain or wake up constantly to flip your pillow to the cold side, bamboo pillows have the potential to help you sleep peacefully through the night.

In this article, we'll explain the benefits of bamboo pillows and how they can help you on your journey to better sleep. We'll also recommend a few of the best pillows on the market so you can choose new bedding that's right for you.

Read More Show Less
Hundreds of Thousands Take to Streets Worldwide for 'Uproot the System' Climate Strikes

"It's even more urgent now than it was before," said Greta Thunberg.

Politics
Climate activist Greta Thunberg speaks at a large-scale climate strike march by Fridays for Future in front of the Reichstag on Sept. 24, 2021 in Berlin, Germany. Maja Hitij / Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

Young people by the hundreds of thousands took to the streets across the globe on Friday to deliver a resounding message to world leaders: The climate crisis is getting worse, and only radical action will be enough to avert catastrophe and secure a just, sustainable future for all.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Extensive meetings in preparation for IPCC's Sixth Assessment Report have been happening online. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change / YouTube

By Kenny Stancil

Amid an ongoing wave of extreme weather disasters and ahead of a major United Nations climate conference this fall, top scientists from nearly 200 countries began meeting Monday to finalize a landmark report detailing how the fossil fuel-driven climate emergency is already wreaking havoc around the globe and what society must do to avert its most catastrophic consequences.

Read More Show Less
The U.S. has officially reentered the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change. Ting Shen / Xinhua / Getty Images

The United States officially reenters the Paris agreement today, a symbolic and important step toward the aggressive action required to stem the tide of climate change.

Read More Show Less
A field of sunflowers near the Mehrum coal-fired power station, wind turbines and high-voltage lines in the Peine district in Lower Saxony, Germany. Julian Stratenschulte / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jake Johnson

The International Energy Agency warned Tuesday that global carbon dioxide emissions are on track to soar to record levels in 2023 — and continue rising thereafter — as governments fail to make adequate investments in green energy and end their dedication to planet-warming fossil fuels.

Read More Show Less
Climate activists with Stop the Money Pipeline hold a rally in midtown Manhattan on March 3, 2021. Erik McGregor / LightRocket via Getty Images

The world's biggest banks gave fossil fuel companies $3.8 trillion in financing in the years following the Paris agreement, according to a new report.