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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) arrives for the House Judiciary Committee markup of the Elder Abuse Protection Act, the Criminal Judicial Administration Act, and other amendments in Washington, DC on May 18, 2021. Tom Williams / CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Republican Representative Louie Gohmert from Texas made headlines Wednesday after comments he made about climate change and the orbit of the Earth and moon went viral.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The moon moves in front of the sun in a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse as seen from Tanjung Piai, Malaysia on Dec. 26, 2019. SADIQ ASYRAF / AFP / Getty Images

Happening just after the "supermoon, red blood moon, lunar eclipse" last month, astronomy lovers can get excited for another celestial event on June 10 — the "ring of fire" solar eclipse.

Those living in northern and eastern sections of North America will be able to witness the eclipse as it overlaps with the sunrise, according to a report made by Space.com. The entirety of the eclipse will last about 100 minutes.

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gorodenkoff / iStock / Getty Images

While many homeowners are switching to solar power to help reduce or even eliminate month-to-month utility costs, there's no arguing that the startup cost of solar panels can be high. One way to save money upfront is with DIY solar panels, but is the challenge of building your own system worth what you save on installation costs?

In this article, we'll take a closer look at the pros and cons of DIY solar panel installation, including important safety factors and whether it's really guaranteed to save you money.

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The world's largest has calved from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. European Space Agency

A massive chunk of ice broke off of Antarctica this month, and it is now the largest iceberg in the world.

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Trending
An airplane view shows a lake of meltwater in the Greenland ice sheet on August 04, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A new study of Greenland's glacial rivers has important implications for how scientists might model future ice melt and subsequent sea level rise.

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Am ExxonMobil operation near Chicago, Illinois in 2014. Richard Hurd / CC BY 2.0

By Sharon Kelly

What's the single word that fossil fuel giant ExxonMobil's flagship environmental reports to investors and the public tie most closely to climate change and global warming?

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Less than three years after California governor Jerry Brown said the state would launch "our own damn satellite" to track pollution in the face of the Trump administration's climate denial, California, NASA, and a constellation of private companies, nonprofits, and foundations are teaming up to do just that.

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An asteroid slated to pass by Earth the day before the U.S. election would burn up if it entered Earth's atmosphere. MARHARYTA MARKO / iStock / Getty Images Plus

If you thought 2020 couldn't get any more dramatic, think again.

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People across New England witnessed a dramatic celestial event Sunday night.

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A sign at Hoover Dam warns of "very dangerous levels" of heat in the forecast at Lake Mead near Boulder City, Nevada on July 1, 2021. David McNew / Getty Images

By Tara Lohan

It's hard not to think about how hot it's been — even if you live somewhere that has escaped the heat in the past few weeks. When British Columbia clocks temperatures of 121° F, it gets the world's attention. As it should.

Here are six reasons why we need to be paying more attention to heat waves.

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Ghost forest panorama in coastal North Carolina. Emily Ury / CC BY-ND

By Emily Ury

Trekking out to my research sites near North Carolina's Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, I slog through knee-deep water on a section of trail that is completely submerged. Permanent flooding has become commonplace on this low-lying peninsula, nestled behind North Carolina's Outer Banks. The trees growing in the water are small and stunted. Many are dead.

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Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Páramos, a type of high-altitude moorland ecosystem found in the South and Central American neotropics, are important water sources since they continually store and release water. Ernesto Tereñes / Getty Images

By Daniel Henryk Rasolt

On a recent, pre-pandemic journey to the High Andes of Colombia, I found myself surrounded by one of the region's emblematic species, the flowering shrubs known locally as frailejones or "big monks." These giant plants, relatives of sunflowers from the Espeletia genus, mesmerized me, their yellow buds and silvery hairs glistening in the intense, ephemeral sunlight.

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EcoWatch is a community of experts publishing quality, science-based content on environmental issues, causes, and solutions for a healthier planet and life.
Rep. Louie Gohmert (R-Texas) arrives for the House Judiciary Committee markup of the Elder Abuse Protection Act, the Criminal Judicial Administration Act, and other amendments in Washington, DC on May 18, 2021. Tom Williams / CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Republican Representative Louie Gohmert from Texas made headlines Wednesday after comments he made about climate change and the orbit of the Earth and moon went viral.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
The moon moves in front of the sun in a rare "ring of fire" solar eclipse as seen from Tanjung Piai, Malaysia on Dec. 26, 2019. SADIQ ASYRAF / AFP / Getty Images

Happening just after the "supermoon, red blood moon, lunar eclipse" last month, astronomy lovers can get excited for another celestial event on June 10 — the "ring of fire" solar eclipse.

Those living in northern and eastern sections of North America will be able to witness the eclipse as it overlaps with the sunrise, according to a report made by Space.com. The entirety of the eclipse will last about 100 minutes.

Read More Show Less
gorodenkoff / iStock / Getty Images

While many homeowners are switching to solar power to help reduce or even eliminate month-to-month utility costs, there's no arguing that the startup cost of solar panels can be high. One way to save money upfront is with DIY solar panels, but is the challenge of building your own system worth what you save on installation costs?

In this article, we'll take a closer look at the pros and cons of DIY solar panel installation, including important safety factors and whether it's really guaranteed to save you money.

Read More Show Less
The world's largest has calved from the western side of the Ronne Ice Shelf in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. European Space Agency

A massive chunk of ice broke off of Antarctica this month, and it is now the largest iceberg in the world.

Read More Show Less
Trending
An airplane view shows a lake of meltwater in the Greenland ice sheet on August 04, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A new study of Greenland's glacial rivers has important implications for how scientists might model future ice melt and subsequent sea level rise.

Read More Show Less
Am ExxonMobil operation near Chicago, Illinois in 2014. Richard Hurd / CC BY 2.0

By Sharon Kelly

What's the single word that fossil fuel giant ExxonMobil's flagship environmental reports to investors and the public tie most closely to climate change and global warming?

Read More Show Less

Less than three years after California governor Jerry Brown said the state would launch "our own damn satellite" to track pollution in the face of the Trump administration's climate denial, California, NASA, and a constellation of private companies, nonprofits, and foundations are teaming up to do just that.

Read More Show Less
An asteroid slated to pass by Earth the day before the U.S. election would burn up if it entered Earth's atmosphere. MARHARYTA MARKO / iStock / Getty Images Plus

If you thought 2020 couldn't get any more dramatic, think again.

Read More Show Less
Trending

People across New England witnessed a dramatic celestial event Sunday night.

Read More Show Less