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Senior Airman Alec Cope plugs in a hybrid vehicle at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts on June 2, 2016. U.S. Air Force photo / Linda LaBonte Britt

By Dana Drugmand

Fossil fuel interests appear intent on swaying public opinion about the electric vehicle tax credit, based on recent polling on the policy. A deeper look at these efforts reveals oil and gas funding behind the groups conducting the polls and blatant bias in the polling methodology, according to experts.

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Looking across the Houston Ship Canal at the ExxonMobil Refinery, Baytown, Texas. Roy Luck, CC BY 2.0

By Nick Cunningham

A growing number of refineries around the world are either curtailing operations or shutting down entirely as the oil market collapses.

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EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Aerial view of Denmark's Baltic Sea Coast. schneider_photografie / Pixabay

A Danish pension fund has said it would sell its stake in major oil companies as their business models are incompatible with the goals set out in the Paris climate agreement.

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Climate change headline in flaming newspaper. RapidEye / iStock / Getty Images

By Andy Rowell

Five years ago, the leading climate denial organization in the UK, the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF), published a pamphlet entitled: Carbon Dioxide, the good news.

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NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii', where researchers measured atmospheric carbon dioxide levels of 415 ppm. Christopher Michel / CC BY 2.0

By Andy Rowell

Earlier this month, we collectively walked into the unknown.

We are all now a living experiment. Never before in human history have carbon dioxide levels reached 415 parts per million.

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BP CEO Bernard Looney speaks during an event in London on Feb. 12, where he declared the company's intentions to achieve "net zero" carbon emissions by 2050. DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP / Getty Images

British-based oil and gas giant BP set the most ambitious climate goal of any company in its industry yesterday when it announced that it will eliminate or offset all of its greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, according to The New York Times. Its ambitious plans included offsetting the burning of oil and gas it takes out of the ground.

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Shell protesters. Dana Drugmand

By Dana Drugmand

Two years after internal documents surfaced showing that Royal Dutch Shell, like ExxonMobil, knew about climate dangers decades ago, the oil giant released its latest annual report outlining its business strategy and approach to addressing climate change. Despite clear warnings from scientists, global health experts and even central banks of impending climate-driven crises, Shell's report largely sends a message that everything is fine and the company's "business strategy is sound."

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Footage from the Ohio State Highway Patrol on the second day of a fracking well blowout that new data reveals caused one of the largest methane leaks in U.S. history. FracTrackerVideos

In February 2018, a blowout at a fracked natural gas well in Belmont County, Ohio forced around 100 nearby residents to flee their homes, as The New York Times reported. Now, a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Monday has revealed that the local incident had major implications for the global climate crisis.

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Trending

By Sabrina Kessler

Far-reaching allegations about how a climate-sinning American multinational could shamelessly lie to the public about its wrongdoing mobilized a small group of New York students on a cold November morning. They stood in front of New York's Supreme Court last week to follow the unprecedented lawsuit against ExxonMobil.

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A man reads a copy of The Guardian newspaper on Sept. 12, 2005 in London, England. Scott Barbour / Getty Images

The Guardian became the first major international newspaper to put an outright ban on accepting money from the fossil fuel industry, citing the industry's "decades-long effort" to subvert, undermine and prevent action to stop the climate crisis, according to The Hill.

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Activists in support of his investigation of ExxonMobil on Feb 22, 2017. Erik McGregor / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Brendan DeMelle

Massachusetts filed a lawsuit against ExxonMobil Thursday over the company's misinformation campaign to delay action to address climate change.

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Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Senior Airman Alec Cope plugs in a hybrid vehicle at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts on June 2, 2016. U.S. Air Force photo / Linda LaBonte Britt

By Dana Drugmand

Fossil fuel interests appear intent on swaying public opinion about the electric vehicle tax credit, based on recent polling on the policy. A deeper look at these efforts reveals oil and gas funding behind the groups conducting the polls and blatant bias in the polling methodology, according to experts.

Read More Show Less
Looking across the Houston Ship Canal at the ExxonMobil Refinery, Baytown, Texas. Roy Luck, CC BY 2.0

By Nick Cunningham

A growing number of refineries around the world are either curtailing operations or shutting down entirely as the oil market collapses.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Aerial view of Denmark's Baltic Sea Coast. schneider_photografie / Pixabay

A Danish pension fund has said it would sell its stake in major oil companies as their business models are incompatible with the goals set out in the Paris climate agreement.

Read More Show Less
Climate change headline in flaming newspaper. RapidEye / iStock / Getty Images

By Andy Rowell

Five years ago, the leading climate denial organization in the UK, the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF), published a pamphlet entitled: Carbon Dioxide, the good news.

Read More Show Less
NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii', where researchers measured atmospheric carbon dioxide levels of 415 ppm. Christopher Michel / CC BY 2.0

By Andy Rowell

Earlier this month, we collectively walked into the unknown.

We are all now a living experiment. Never before in human history have carbon dioxide levels reached 415 parts per million.

Read More Show Less
BP CEO Bernard Looney speaks during an event in London on Feb. 12, where he declared the company's intentions to achieve "net zero" carbon emissions by 2050. DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS / AFP / Getty Images

British-based oil and gas giant BP set the most ambitious climate goal of any company in its industry yesterday when it announced that it will eliminate or offset all of its greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, according to The New York Times. Its ambitious plans included offsetting the burning of oil and gas it takes out of the ground.

Read More Show Less
Shell protesters. Dana Drugmand

By Dana Drugmand

Two years after internal documents surfaced showing that Royal Dutch Shell, like ExxonMobil, knew about climate dangers decades ago, the oil giant released its latest annual report outlining its business strategy and approach to addressing climate change. Despite clear warnings from scientists, global health experts and even central banks of impending climate-driven crises, Shell's report largely sends a message that everything is fine and the company's "business strategy is sound."

Read More Show Less

Footage from the Ohio State Highway Patrol on the second day of a fracking well blowout that new data reveals caused one of the largest methane leaks in U.S. history. FracTrackerVideos

In February 2018, a blowout at a fracked natural gas well in Belmont County, Ohio forced around 100 nearby residents to flee their homes, as The New York Times reported. Now, a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Monday has revealed that the local incident had major implications for the global climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

Trending

By Sabrina Kessler

Far-reaching allegations about how a climate-sinning American multinational could shamelessly lie to the public about its wrongdoing mobilized a small group of New York students on a cold November morning. They stood in front of New York's Supreme Court last week to follow the unprecedented lawsuit against ExxonMobil.

Read More Show Less
A man reads a copy of The Guardian newspaper on Sept. 12, 2005 in London, England. Scott Barbour / Getty Images

The Guardian became the first major international newspaper to put an outright ban on accepting money from the fossil fuel industry, citing the industry's "decades-long effort" to subvert, undermine and prevent action to stop the climate crisis, according to The Hill.

Read More Show Less
Activists in support of his investigation of ExxonMobil on Feb 22, 2017. Erik McGregor / Pacific Press / LightRocket / Getty Images

By Brendan DeMelle

Massachusetts filed a lawsuit against ExxonMobil Thursday over the company's misinformation campaign to delay action to address climate change.

Read More Show Less
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

A massive oil spill threatened St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana on Sept. 18, 2005 when an oil tank was forced from its foundation by Hurricane Katrina's massive storm surge. Bob McMillan / FEMA

The devastation to lives and homes caused by Hurricane Katrina masked a massive crude oil spill that the hurricane caused by damaging rigs and storage tanks in the Gulf of Mexico. The damage was made worse a few weeks later when Hurricane Rita struck the area. The federal regulators that oversee oil and gas operation in the Gulf estimated that more than 400 pipelines and 100 drilling platforms were damaged, leading to 10.8 million gallons of crude oil spilling into the Gulf — the same amount as the Exxon Valdez oil spill.

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ExxonMobil refinery in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. WClarke / CC BY-SA 4.0
A Buddha bowl vegan meal with kale, quinoa, green sprouts and season greens. fortyforks / iStock / Getty Images Plus
Maarten Visser / CC BY-SA 2.0

By John R. Platt

It's a cold Wednesday morning, and I'm standing in the dark outside a hotel waiting for my rideshare vehicle to arrive.

My phone chirps to let me know that an unusual car is about to pull up: a Tesla. The driver greets me, and I eagerly climb in the back seat — after I figure out how to open the door (the recessed, aerodynamic handles are just as novel to me as the rest of the car).

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Pacific Press / Contributor / LightRocket / Getty Images

Massachusetts' Democratic Attorney General Maura Healey declared "victory" on Monday after the U.S. Supreme Court rejected ExxonMobil's attempt to derail her office's probe into whether the fossil fuel giant misled investors and the public about its knowledge of climate change.

The justices declined to hear Exxon's appeal of an April ruling by Massachusetts' highest court, Reuters reported.

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