Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Hollywood Heavyweights Team With Sea Shepherd on World Oceans Day

Popular
www.facebook.com

Sea Shepherd Conservation Society partnered with a group of Hollywood industry heavyweights and a middle school from the Los Angeles Unified School District on a student filmmaking contest.

The winner's film was released as Sea Shepherd's official PSA this morning for World Oceans Day.


Last December, the 7th and 8th grade Cinematic Arts Academy students at Millikan Middle School in Sherman Oaks, California, were challenged to create a short film about what World Oceans Day means to them.

The winning film, Oceans, by 14-year-old Carson Strassman, edged out runner up 13-year-old Herschey Liss' film, Every Ocean, by one vote.

"I have always maintained that the camera is our greatest weapon," said Sea Shepherd founder and CEO Captain Paul Watson. "These young filmmakers demonstrate the power of filmmaking and its ability to affect change. Carson's stunning visuals were beyond impressive and showed us how urgent it is to take a stand for our Oceans. Runner up Herschey's direct-to-camera message gave a personal viewpoint that hit right in the heart. Congratulations to both the first and second place winners."

Due to the close race, contest judge Karen Baker Landers of Hollywood post-production facility Formosa Group extended her part of the prize package to both filmmakers: having the two student short films sound remixed by Jared Marshak under Baker Landers' supervision on Formosa Group's stages in Hollywood prior to Sea Shepherd releasing the films.

"I'm absolutely blown away by how articulate both kids are as filmmakers," said Landers.

First place winner Strassman's prizes also include spending the day on the set of a commercial or music video produced by Supply & Demand Integrated. The bi-coastal company is behind music videos for such artists as Taylor Swift as well as commercials and promotions for brands like Tesla, Nike and Coca-Cola among others.

"These are two amazing shorts and hard to believe they were made by a 13 and 14-year-old; both films are passionate and moving," said Diane Weyermann, who, as an executive, has overseen the release of such Participant documentaries as the Oscar winning Citizenfour and An Inconvenient Truth.

"Watching Carson and Hershey's films was a great pleasure," added twice Oscar nominated editor Joe Walker, who is currently editing Sony's upcoming Blade Runner 2049. "Two film-makers responding to the issue with dynamically different styles but equally endearing personalities. I'm so encouraged that the environment has two great advocates in the making and that they used film so thoughtfully as their means of communication."

Strassman had this to say after finding out his film was chosen as the winning film and Sea Shepherd's official PSA: "I am really excited about winning this competition because it gives my film the opportunity to be seen and inspire people to help save the Ocean."

The judges for the contest included: Double Oscar winning sound editor Karen Baker Landers (Skyfall, The Bourne Ultimatum), Academy Award winning documentary filmmaker Louie Psihoyos (The Cove), twice Oscar nominated editor Joe Walker (Twelve Years A Slave, Arrival), Participant Pictures executive vice president of documentary films Diane Weyermann, Sea Shepherd founder and CEO Captain Paul Watson, documentary filmmakers and producers Gabriela Cowperthwaite (Blackfish), Kief Davidson (The Ivory Game), Kip Andersen (Cowspiracy), Ross McCall (The Grind of the Faroe Islands), Lesley Chilcott (An Inconvenient Truth) and Sea Shepherd youth ambassador and actor, Zach Callison.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

In Germany's Hunsrück village of Schorbach, numerous photovoltaic systems are installed on house roofs, on Sept. 19, 2019. Thomas Frey / Picture Alliance via Getty Images

Germany's target for renewable energy sources to deliver 65% of its consumed electricity by 2030 seemed on track Wednesday, with 52% of electricity coming from renewables in 2020's first quarter. Renewable energy advocates, however, warned the trend is imperiled by slowdowns in building new wind and solar plants.

Read More Show Less

In many parts of the U.S., family farms are disappearing and being replaced by suburban sprawl.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
General view of the empty Alma bridge, in front of the Eiffel tower, while the city imposes emergency measures to combat the Coronavirus COVID-19 outbreak, on March 17, 2020 in Paris, France. Edward Berthelot / Getty Images

Half the world is on lockdown. So, the constant hum of cars, trucks, trains and heavy machinery has stopped, drastically reducing the intensity of the vibrations rippling through the Earth's crust. Seismologists, who use highly sensitive equipment, have noticed a difference in the hum caused by human activity, according to Fast Company.

Read More Show Less
The current rate of CO2 emissions is a major event in the recorded history of Earth. EPA

By Andrew Glikson

At several points in the history of our planet, increasing amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have caused extreme global warming, prompting the majority of species on Earth to die out.

Read More Show Less
The "Earthrise" photograph that inspired the first Earth Day. NASA / Bill Anders

For EcoWatchers, April usually means one thing: Earth Day. But how do you celebrate the environment while staying home to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus?

Read More Show Less