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Sea Shepherd Founder to Bill Maher: ‘If Oceans Die, We Die'

You can always expect to see Captain Paul Watson on the front lines of the battle to conserve and protect marine ecosystems for wildlife. He and his Sea Shepherd Conservation Society have been doing it for nearly 40 years.


A late-night, cable television got the chance to learn more about Watson's mission during the most recent episode of Real Time with Bill Maher. He discussed some of his biggest enemies—Japanese whalers—and his joy regarding last week's International Court of Justice ruling that Japan's "research whaling" is illegal. It marked a big moment for Watson, who says he has been labeled an "eco-terrorist" for years.

"I'm not an eco-terrorist—I don't work for BP," he said to a round of applause from the studio audience.

Back in February, chapters of Watson's organization hosted “World Love for Dolphins Day" demonstrations in large cities, calling for an end to brutal dolphin hunts in Taiji, Japan's killing cove.

Watson has also been jailed for his cause. He was arrested two years ago in Germany for extradition to Costa Rica for ship traffic violation as he exposed an illegal shark finning operation on Guatemalan waters run by a Costa Rican company.

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International Court Rules Japan's 'Research' Whaling Illegal in Landmark Case

250+ Bottlenose Dolphins Captured in Japan's Taiji Cove Hunt

Sea World Responds to Blackfish Documentary, Sea Shepherd Sets the Record Straight

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