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Sea Levels Could Rise at Fastest Rate in Human History

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Sea Levels Could Rise at Fastest Rate in Human History

Without the emissions cuts laid out in the Paris agreement, global temperatures could reach 2 C as early as 2040 and cause the fastest acceleration in sea level rise in human history, according to a new study.

Sea levels could rise up to a foot in the most vulnerable cities by mid-century, with the rate of sea level rise reaching 6 millimeters per year by 2040 and more than 10 millimeters a year by the end of the century. The current rate of sea level rise is estimated to be around 3.4 millimeters a year.

"If warming continues above 2 degrees Celsius, then, by 2100, sea level will be rising faster than at any time during human civilization," the study says.

According to the study, these heavily populated, rapidly growing cities are at most risk with at least 2.9 feet of sea level rise expected by 2100:

  • Dakar, Senegal
  • Guangzhou, China
  • Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • Lagos, Nigeria
  • Manila, Philippines
  • Qingdao, China

For a deeper dive:

Washington Post, Mashable

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