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Top 12 Health Benefits of Sea Buckthorn Oil

Health + Wellness
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By Alina Petre, MS, RD (CA)

Sea buckthorn oil has been used for thousands of years as a natural remedy against various ailments.


It is extracted from the berries, leaves and seeds of the sea buckthorn plant (Hippophae rhamnoides), which is a small shrub that grows at high altitudes in the northwest Himalayan region (1).

Sometimes referred to as the holy fruit of the Himalayas, sea buckthorn can be applied to the skin or ingested.

A popular remedy in Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicines, it may provide health benefits ranging from supporting your heart to protecting against diabetes, stomach ulcers and skin damage.

Here are 12 science-backed benefits of sea buckthorn oil.


1. Rich in Many Nutrients

Sea buckthorn oil is rich in various vitamins, minerals and beneficial plant compounds (2, 3).

For instance, it is naturally full of antioxidants, which help protect your body against aging and illnesses like cancer and heart disease (4).

The seeds and leaves are also particularly rich in quercetin, a flavonoid linked to lower blood pressure and a reduced risk of heart disease (5, 6, 7, 8).

What's more, its berries boast potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron and phosphorus. They also contain good amounts of folate, biotin and vitamins B1, B2, B6, C and E (9, 10, 11).

More than half of the fat found in sea buckthorn oil is mono- and polyunsaturated fat, which are two types of healthy fats (12).

Interestingly, sea buckthorn oil may also be one of the only plant foods known to provide all four omega fatty acids—omega-3, omega-6, omega-7 and omega-9 (13).

Summary

Sea buckthorn oil is rich in various vitamins and minerals, as well as antioxidants and other plant compounds potentially beneficial to your health.

2. Promotes Heart Health

Sea buckthorn oil may benefit heart health in several different ways.

For starters, its antioxidants may help reduce risk factors of heart disease, including blood clots, blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels.

In one small study, 12 healthy men were given either 5 grams of sea buckthorn oil or coconut oil per day. After four weeks, the men in the sea buckthorn group had significantly lower markers of blood clots (14).

In another study, taking 0.75 ml of sea buckthorn oil daily for 30 days helped reduce blood pressure levels in people with high blood pressure. Levels of triglycerides, as well as total and "bad" LDL cholesterol, also dropped in those who had high cholesterol.

However, the effects on people with normal blood pressure and cholesterol levels were less pronounced (15).

A recent review also determined that sea buckthorn extracts may reduce cholesterol levels in people with poor heart health—but not in healthy participants (16).

Summary

Sea buckthorn oil may aid your heart by reducing blood pressure, improving blood cholesterol levels and protecting against blood clots. That said, effects may be strongest in people with poor heart health.

3. May Protect Against Diabetes

Sea buckthorn oil may also help prevent diabetes.

Animal studies show that it may help reduce blood sugar levels by increasing insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity (17, 18).

One small human study notes that sea buckthorn oil may help minimize blood sugar spikes after a carb-rich meal (19).

Because frequent, long-term blood sugar spikes can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes, preventing them is expected to reduce your risk.

However, more studies are needed before strong conclusions can be made.

Summary

Sea buckthorn may help improve insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, both of which could protect against type 2 diabetes—though more research is needed.

4. Protects Your Skin

Compounds in sea buckthorn oil may boost your skin health when applied directly.

For instance, test-tube and animal studies show that the oil may help stimulate skin regeneration, helping wounds heal more quickly (20, 21).

Similarly, animal studies reveal that sea buckthorn oil may also help reduce inflammation following UV exposure, protecting skin against sun damage (22).

Researchers believe that both of these effects may stem from sea buckthorn's omega-7 and omega-3 fat content (23).

In a seven-week study in 11 young men, a mix of sea buckthorn oil and water applied directly to the skin promoted skin elasticity better than a placebo (24).

There's also some evidence that sea buckthorn oil may prevent skin dryness and help your skin heal from burns, frostbite and bedsores (23, 25, 26).

Keep in mind that more human studies are needed.

Summary

Sea buckthorn oil may help your skin heal from wounds, sunburns, frostbite and bedsores. It may also promote elasticity and protect against dryness.

5. May Boost Your Immune System

Sea buckthorn oil may help protect your body against infections.

Experts attribute this effect, in large part, to the high flavonoid content of the oil.

Flavonoids are beneficial plant compounds which may strengthen your immune system by increasing resistance to illnesses (4, 27).

In one test-tube study, sea buckthorn oil prevented the growth of bacteria such as E. coli (12).

In others, sea buckthorn oil offered protection against influenza, herpes and HIV viruses (4).

Sea buckthorn oil contains a good amount of antioxidants, beneficial plant compounds that may also help defend your body against microbes (28).

That said, research in humans is lacking.

Summary

Sea buckthorn oil is rich in beneficial plant compounds such as flavonoids and antioxidants, which may help your body fight infections.

6. May Support a Healthy Liver

Sea buckthorn oil may also contribute to a healthy liver.

That's because it contains healthy fats, vitamin E and carotenoids, all of which may safeguard liver cells from damage (29).

In one study, sea buckthorn oil significantly improved markers of liver function in rats with liver damage (30).

In another study, people with cirrhosis—an advanced form of liver disease—were given 15 grams of sea buckthorn extract or a placebo three times per day for six months.

Those in the sea buckthorn group increased their blood markers of liver function significantly more than those given a placebo (31).

In two other studies, people with non-alcoholic liver disease given either 0.5 or 1.5 grams of sea buckthorn 1–3 times daily saw blood cholesterol, triglyceride and liver enzyme levels improve significantly more than those given a placebo (32, 33).

Although these effects seem promising, more studies are necessary to make firm conclusions.

Summary

Compounds in sea buckthorn may aid liver function, though more studies are needed.

7. May Help Fight Cancer Cells

Compounds present in sea buckthorn oil may help fight cancer. These protective effects may be caused by the flavonoids and antioxidants in the oil.

For instance, sea buckthorn is rich in quercetin, a flavonoid which appears to help kill cancer cells (8).

Sea buckthorn's various antioxidants, including carotenoids and vitamin E, may also protect against this notorious disease (34, 35).

A few test-tube and animal studies suggest that sea buckthorn extracts may be effective at preventing the spread of cancer cells (36, 37).

However, the reported cancer-fighting effects of sea buckthorn oil are much milder than those of chemotherapy drugs (38).

Keep in mind that these effects have not yet been tested in humans, so more studies are needed.

Summary

Sea buckthorn oil provides certain beneficial plant compounds which may offer some protection against cancer. However, its effects are likely mild—and human research is lacking.

8–12. Other Potential Benefits

Sea buckthorn oil is said to give additional health benefits. However, not all claims are supported by sound science. Those with the most evidence include:

8. May improve digestion: Animal studies indicate that sea buckthorn oil may help prevent and treat stomach ulcers (39, 40).

9. May reduce symptoms of menopause: Sea buckthorn may reduce vaginal drying and act as an effective alternative treatment for postmenopausal women who cannot take estrogen (41).

10. May treat dry eyes: In one study, daily sea buckthorn intake was linked to reduced eye redness and burning (42).

11. May lower inflammation: Research in animals indicates that sea buckthorn leaf extracts helped reduce joint inflammation (43).

12. May reduce symptoms of depression: Animal studies report that sea buckthorn may have antidepressant effects. However, this hasn't been studied in humans (44).

It's important to note that most of these studies are small and very few involve humans. Therefore, more research is needed before strong conclusions can be made.

Summary

Sea buckthorn may offer an array of additional health benefits, ranging from reduced inflammation to menopause treatment. However, more studies—especially in humans—are needed.

The Bottom Line

Sea buckthorn oil is a popular alternative remedy for a variety of ailments.

It is rich in many nutrients and may improve the health of your skin, liver and heart. It may also help protect against diabetes and aid your immune system.

As this plant product has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, it may be worth trying to give your body a boost.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Healthline.

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