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Scientists Turn CO2 Into Solid Rock

Climate
Scientists Turn CO2 Into Solid Rock

Scientists in Iceland successfully turned carbon dioxide emissions from a power plant into stone, they reported in Science. The team injected CO2 mixed with water into basalt rock, which formed limestone after two years.

Co-author Sandra Snaebjornsdottir displays a core of porous basalt laced with carbonate materials from the carbon sequestration process. Photo credit: Kevin Krajick / Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a divisive issue in the climate and energy community, but the scientists are confident that solidifying the gas would prevent it from leaking back into the atmosphere, as is the danger with many CCS methods.

"Carbon capture is not the silver bullet, but it can contribute significantly to reducing carbon dioxide emissions," lead author Juerg Matter said of the experiment.

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For a deeper dive: Washington Post, AP, New York Times, Climate Central, The Guardian, Gizmodo, Vocativ, CNBC, Los Angeles Times, Phys.org, National Geographic, Smithsonian, InsideClimate News, Climate Home, Independent, Economist, IB Times

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

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