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Scientists: Links Between Climate Change and Extreme Weather Are Clear

Climate
Scientists: Links Between Climate Change and Extreme Weather Are Clear

Scientists can now determine with confidence to what extent climate change has impacted some extreme weather events, according to a new report by a high-level panel from the National Academies of Sciences. 

NASA visualization of Super storm Sandy. Photo credit: NASA

The report looks at research papers assessing the connections between global climate change and individual events, and finds that their results—and consequentially, the field of climate attribution—are scientifically valid. Climate attribution has become more common since 2004, as scientists have developed the tools to create complex computer models and assess the historical record. The panel determined that there is highest confidence in studies looking at climate and extreme heat or cold and moderate confidence in findings on drought and extreme rain. 

For a deeper dive:

News: Washington PostThe Hill, InsideClimate News, AP, USA Today, Christian Science Monitor, TIME, Reuters, Carbon Brief, VOA News, Phys.org.

CommentaryNew York Times, Heidi Cullen op-ed, Washington Post, Adam Sobel op-ed 

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