Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Science Over Politics: Cuomo's Delay on Lifting Fracking Moratorium is Applauded

Energy
Science Over Politics: Cuomo's Delay on Lifting Fracking Moratorium is Applauded

Physicians Scientists & Engineers for Healthy Energy

Yesterday, Anthony Ingraffea, president of Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy (PSE), and Seth B. Shonkoff, executive director of PSE, sent a letter applauding Gov. Cuomo's decision to delay lifting the moratorium on hydraulic fracturing until the science is complete.

Dear Governor Cuomo:

Physicians, Scientists and Engineers for Healthy Energy (PSE) applauds your move to delay your decision on lifting the moratorium on shale gas development in New York until the science is complete.  We thank you for remaining true to your word that the science should be definitive to the decision making process.

We commend you for making this decision especially because it runs counter to some actions taken by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and governors in other states with shale oil and gas such as Governor Corbett of Pennsylvania, Governor Kasich of Ohio and Governor Hickenlooper of Colorado who have failed to allow the science to guide their decision making.

After lobbying by former Governor Ed Rendell, the EPA prematurely dropped its legal action against Range Resources in a groundwater contamination case in Texas with no scientific basis, ignoring reports by independent scientists that the contamination may have been caused by shale gas drilling.

In Pennsylvania, Governor Corbett ushered in Marcellus shale gas drilling without any scientific oversight and passed Act 13 in the absence of rigorous medical and scientific information.

Governor Cuomo, you have signaled with your action to delay your decision on lifting the moratorium on shale gas production that it is imperative that science, not politics drive your decision. This is especially important since emerging science has increasingly found shale gas production to be fraught with risks to the environment, to climate and to human health.

Sincerely yours,

Anthony Ingraffea, PhD, PE                       Seth B. Shonkoff, PhD, MPH
President                                                         Executive Director

This letter was written in reference to Health Commissioner Dr. Nirav Shah's letter to the Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner (DEC) Joe Martens on Feb. 12, that says the Department of Health will need more time to complete its review of the health impact assessment of hydrofracking contained in DEC’s mammoth environmental impact statement.

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Sign the petition today, telling President Obama to enact an immediate fracking moratorium:

 

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less