Quantcast

Savor Seaweed in Drinks, Snacks, Seasonings and Even Spirits

Food
Lori Eanes

By Lesley Jacobs Solmonson

Dozens of edible varieties of seaweed—the broad term for 10,000-plus types of marine plants and algae—are high in minerals, fiber, antioxidants and sometimes protein.


Plus, seaweed is self-propagating and sucks up excess carbon dioxide, nitrogen and phosphorus from the ocean. This means health-conscious enviros can feel good about savoring its unique flavor in drinks, snacks, seasonings and even spirits.

The briny, vegetal flavor of Oakland Spirits Company's OsCo Automatic Sea Gin stems from local ingredients foraged in the San Francisco Bay Area. Every week, OsCo distillers purchase five pounds of sustainably harvested and sun-dried nori from farmers in nearby Mendocino County and blend it with coastal bay leaves, sage and lemongrass. Then, a small-batch grape distillation process lends this umami spirit a soft, velvety mouthfeel. $30 to $35 for 750 ml, oaklandspirits.com

Cup of Sea founder Josh Rogers credits his grandparents—who snacked on dried dulse, a reddish-purple alga—with inspiring his loose-leaf Maine Seaweed Teas. $12 for 1.5 oz, cupofsea.me

AKUA works with organizations that train out-of-work fishers to farm the ocean. Its Kelp Jerky is an organic, high-protein snack made from kelp, mushrooms and spices. $4 for 1.5 oz, akua.co

Emerald Cove harvests six types of seaweed to create Instant Pacific Sea Salad, a dehydrated blend that lends flair to soups, salads and fries. About $7 for .75 oz, great-eastern-sun.com

The sea even holds an answer for sweet tooths—Coconut & Chocolate Seaweed Strips from Ocean's Halo may be the world's healthiest "candy." About $4 a pouch, oceanshalo.com

Sea Seasonings Dulse Granules from Maine Coast Sea Vegetables offer a nutritious, low-sodium salt alternative that can be sprinkled on almost any meal. $4.15 a shaker, seaveg.com

Reposted with permission from our media associate SIERRA Magazine.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A new report spotlights a U.N. estimate that at least 275 million people rely on healthy coral reefs. A sea turtle near the Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef is seen above. THE OCEAN AGENCY / XL CATLIN SEAVIEW SURVEY

By Jessica Corbett

In a new report about how the world's coral reefs face "the combined threats of climate change, pollution, and overfishing" — endangering the future of marine biodiversity — a London-based nonprofit calls for greater global efforts to end the climate crisis and ensure the survival of these vital underwater ecosystems.

Read More
Half of the extracted resources used were sand, clay, gravel and cement, seen above, for building, along with the other minerals that produce fertilizer. Cavan Images / Cavan / Getty Images

The world is using up more and more resources and global recycling is falling. That's the grim takeaway from a new report by the Circle Economy think tank, which found that the world used up more than 110 billion tons, or 100.6 billion metric tons, of natural resources, as Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported.

Read More
Sponsored

By Gero Rueter

Heating with coal, oil and natural gas accounts for around a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. But that's something we can change, says Wolfgang Feist, founder of the Passive House Institute in the western German city of Darmstadt.

Read More
Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016. Markus Spiske / Unsplash

By George Citroner

  • Recent research finds that official government figures may be underestimating drug deaths by half.
  • Researchers estimate that 142,000 people died due to drug use in 2016.
  • Drug use decreases life expectancy after age 15 by 1.4 years for men and by just under 1 year for women, on average.

Government records may be severely underreporting how many Americans die from drug use, according to a new study by researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University.

Read More
Water coolers in front of shut-off water fountains at Center School in Stow, MA on Sept. 4, 2019 after elevated levels of PFAS were found in the water. David L. Ryan / The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In a new nationwide assessment of drinking water systems, the Environmental Working Group found that toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS are far more prevalent than previously thought.

Read More