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'Save the Black Warrior' with SweetWater Brewing Company

Black Warrior Riverkeeper

SweetWater Brewing Company is launching its annual “Save the Black Warrior” program, which has raised more than $35,000 to date to support Black Warrior Riverkeeper’s water protection efforts since the partnership began in 2008. "Save the Black Warrior" takes place at participating Tuscaloosa and Birmingham restaurants and bars from June 1 through July 7.

Throughout the program, people in Birmingham and Tuscaloosa can visit their favorite watering holes and purchase “paper fish” for $1, $5 or $10, or a "Save the Black Warrior" T-shirt, helping raise awareness and funding for river protection. To see the list of participating establishments and learn other ways to help, click here. This website also features an online contest to win an Arc'teryx jacket donated by Mountain High Outfitters, who is sponsoring "Save the Black Warrior" along with H2 Real Estate.

SweetWater organizes “Save the Waterways” collaborations with other Waterkeeper Alliance organizations in the Southeast, including French Broad Riverkeeper, Mobile Baykeeper, Neuse Riverkeeper, Charleston Waterkeeper, Apalachicola Riverkeeper, St. Johns Riverkeeper and Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper.

Last year, SweetWater launched Waterkeeper Hefeweizen, an unfiltered ale created specifically to bring awareness to the Waterkeeper organizations, their mission, and their “Save the Waterways” campaigns. The brew will hit draft taps across the Southeast later this month.

“2012 is particularly exciting because 'Save the Black Warrior' coincides with our nonprofit’s tenth anniversary,” said Charles Scribner, executive director of Black Warrior Riverkeeper. On June 6, SweetWater is providing the beer for “Cruisin’ on the River,” Black Warrior Riverkeeper’s tenth anniversary event on Tuscaloosa’s Bama Belle Riverboat.

For more information, click here.

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