Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Save Seeds to Protect Biodiversity

Food
Save Seeds to Protect Biodiversity

The documentary SEED points out that many irreplaceable seeds are nearing extinction. The future of seeds is at risk from biotech and industrial seed companies that control seeds through genetic modification and patents.

Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Saving seeds, once a common gardening practice, has grown again in popularity—both to create sound ecological systems and to empower individuals.

As Dr. Vandana Shiva affirms in her Declaration on Seed Freedom: Seed freedom is the birth right of every form of life and is the basis for the protection of biodiversity.

From empowerment to protecting biodiversity, an increase in seed saving libraries, member organizations and informal seed swaps highlights the importance of protecting our heirloom, open-pollinated seeds.

Rodale News recently interviewed John Torgrimson, president and executive director of Seed Savers Exchange, an Iowa-based nonprofit that preserves heirloom plant varieties, including through a seed exchange. Torgrimson offered the following pointers on vegetable seed saving:

  • Save seeds from open-pollinated and heirloom varieties, not hybrids. 


  • Understand how your plants pollinate.

  • Healthy plants = healthy seed.

  • Properly label and store your seeds.

As Torgrimson points out, “When a seed variety is lost, it is lost forever.”

Terra Chips, which has partnered with Seed Savers Exchange to celebrate vegetable diversity, produced the following infographic addressing the need to save heirloom seeds:

If you are interested in learning more about saving your heirloom seeds, the Cleveland Seed Bank offers a selection of how-to webinars, starting with Seed Saving for Beginners.

Join the growing number of individuals, libraries and organizations saving biodiversity, while enjoying some heirloom vegetables, meeting new people and experimenting in your garden.

 

An Edith's Checkerspot butterfly in Los Padres National Forest in Southern California. Patricia Marroquin / Moment / Getty Images

Butterflies across the U.S. West are disappearing, and now researchers say the climate crisis is largely to blame.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A wildfire burns in the Hollywood hills on July 19, 2016 in Hollywood, California. AaronP / Bauer-Griffin / GC Images

California faces another "critically dry year" according to state officials, and a destructive wildfire season looms on its horizon. But in a state that welcomes innovation, water efficacy approaches and drought management could replenish California, increasingly threatened by the climate's new extremes.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Wisdom is seen with her chick in Feb. 2021 at the Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. Jon Brack / Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge / Flickr / CC 2.0

Wisdom the mōlī, or Laysan albatross, is the oldest wild bird known to science at the age of at least 70. She is also, as of February 1, a new mother.

Read More Show Less
Wind turbines in Norway. piola66 / E+ / Getty Images

By Hui Hu

Winter is supposed to be the best season for wind power – the winds are stronger, and since air density increases as the temperature drops, more force is pushing on the blades. But winter also comes with a problem: freezing weather.

Read More Show Less
Jaffa Port in Israel. theDOCK innovated the Israeli maritime space and kickstarted a boom in new technologies. Pixabay

While traditional investment in the ocean technology sector has been tentative, growth in Israeli maritime innovations has been exponential in the last few years, and environmental concern has come to the forefront.

Read More Show Less