Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Sanders Overtakes Clinton in Iowa Poll

Politics

New polling released Thursday puts Bernie Sanders ahead of Hillary Clinton in the key voting state of Iowa for the first time, marking his continued and growing popularity among voters in the lead-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

The senator from Vermont now has a small edge over Clinton with 41 percent of respondents saying they would vote for him over the former Secretary of State. Photo credit: Michael Vadon / flickr

The senator from Vermont now has a small edge over Clinton with 41 percent of respondents saying they would vote for him over the former Secretary of State, who polled at 40 percent in the new Quinnipiac survey. Two months ago, Sanders was behind Clinton by 21 points.

Vice President Joe Biden, who has hinted that he is considering entering the race but has yet to make any formal declarations, received 12 percent, with former Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley trailing at 3 percent.

"[P]eople said there was no way we could win Iowa ... Our successes in these polls are a clear indication that Bernie's message is resonating with voters," said Sanders' campaign manager Jeff Weaver on Thursday.

The latest poll follows another recent survey showing Sanders ahead of Clinton in New Hampshire, another crucial battleground state.

CNN noted on Thursday that although Clinton still leads Sanders in national polls, similar dynamics were in play in 2008 when President Barack Obama, then a senator, began gaining ground against a seemingly inevitable nominee.

The senator's rise in voter polls began earlier this summer as his populist campaign platform resonated with unexpectedly large crowds. At the same time, Clinton found herself dogged by scandals over email servers used during her time in the Obama administration.

CNN reports:

Even if she were to ultimately lose Iowa and New Hampshire, Clinton's financial and political power could make her formidable in the states that vote next, especially in the south. But her ratings on key personality questions are giving some Democrats pause. Clinton chose to issue a formal apology this week for some of her email practices, but 30 percent of Democratic voters responding to the poll said they do not find her honest and trustworthy. Only 4 percent said the same was true of Sanders and 5 percent of Biden.

According to Weaver, the latest polling in Iowa is only an indication of where the Sanders' campaign is heading nationally. "The more people hear about Bernie's vision of economic, racial and social justice, the more our support grows," he said.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Koch Brothers: Apocalyptical Forces of Ignorance and Greed, Says RFK Jr.

Sarah Palin Blasts Obama Claiming Glaciers Are Growing and Man Isn’t to Blame for Climate Change

Watch the Documentary Donald Trump Has Prevented You From Seeing for 24 Years

Bernie Sanders: The Environment Deserves a Debate

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protest against the name of the Washington Redskins in Minneapolis, Minnesota on Nov. 2, 2014. Fibonacci Blue / CC BY 2.0

The Washington Redskins will retire their controversial name and logo, the National Football League (NFL) team announced Monday.

Read More Show Less
The survival tools northern fish have used for millennia could be a disadvantage as environmental conditions warm and more fast-paced species move in. Istvan Banyai / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Alyssa Murdoch, Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle and Sapna Sharma

Summer has finally arrived in the northern reaches of Canada and Alaska, liberating hundreds of thousands of northern stream fish from their wintering habitats.

Read More Show Less
A mother walks her children through a fountain on a warm summer day on July 12, 2020 in Hoboken, New Jersey. Gary Hershorn / Getty Images

A heat wave that set in over the South and Southwest left much of the U.S. blanketed in record-breaking triple digit temperatures over the weekend. The widespread and intense heat wave will last for weeks, making the magnitude and duration of its heat impressive, according to The Washington Post.

Read More Show Less
If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus. blackCAT / Getty Images

By Joni Sweet

If you get a call from a number you don't recognize, don't hit decline — it might be a contact tracer calling to let you know that someone you've been near has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Read More Show Less
Aerial view of burnt areas of the Amazon rainforest, near Porto Velho, Rondonia state, Brazil, on Aug. 24, 2019. CARLOS FABAL / AFP via Getty Images

NASA scientists say that warmer than average surface sea temperatures in the North Atlantic raise the concern for a more active hurricane season, as well as for wildfires in the Amazon thousands of miles away, according to Newsweek.

Read More Show Less
A baby receives limited treatment at a hospital in Yemen on June 27, 2020. Mohammed Hamoud / Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Oxfam International warned Thursday that up to 12,000 people could die each day by the end of the year as a result of hunger linked to the coronavirus pandemic—a daily death toll surpassing the daily mortality rate from Covid-19 itself.

Read More Show Less

Trending

The 2006 oil spill was the largest incident in Philippine history and damaged 1,600 acres of mangrove forests. Shubert Ciencia / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Jun N. Aguirre

An oil spill on July 3 threatens a mangrove forest on the Philippine island of Guimaras, an area only just recovering from the country's largest spill in 2006.

Read More Show Less