Quantcast
Insights

Sam Branson: Why Ending Energy Poverty Is a Race We Must Win

"When you are faced with a crisis, you either feel paralyzed by fear or feel empowered to make a change."

That is a quote the amazing Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor once told me, and it's exactly how I feel when it comes to facing a challenge.

It's why I embarked on a three-month expedition to the Arctic to highlight climate change, and it's why I travelled from London to the Matterhorn in Switzerland entirely under human power to raise money for life skills programs around the UK.

I care about this planet deeply, and trying to make the world a better place is something that drives me every day. This is a wonderful world—it's not just a place we live in, but it's a living and fragile entity that needs to be cared for.

One of those crisis' that the world is facing is energy poverty. More than 1.3 billion people in the world lack access to the very things that we take as granted—affordable and reliable electricity. That is a staggering and very worrying statistic, and it needs to be dealt with. That is why I am delighted there is a day of action today, May 6, to highlight energy poverty.

I set up my production company, Sundog Pictures, to make a difference by telling stories that matter and help to change the way people see the world. That is the power of films—they can take vast and complex subjects and make you understand them in an engaging and entertaining way. They can change your view of the world in a very short space of time.

Narrated by Scarlett Johansson, our #aRaceWeMustWin film is a hard hitting short that deals with the facts about energy poverty.

As Scarlett says, “As someone who cares deeply about this planet, the idea that in this day and age young children die every year due to lack of electricity is simply unacceptable"

"What people want in life is a purpose. They don't want to merely survive—what they want is an opportunity to provide a life for themselves and a chance to prove their worth. Getting them out of energy poverty gives them that opportunity."

There are many great initiatives out there that are trying to empower the lives that are in danger, and this film is part of the Wind for Prosperity journey that Sundog Pictures are proudly telling the story of.

Anchored on wind power technology, Wind for Prosperity aims to help the tens of millions of people that are in energy poverty and live in areas with abundant wind resources. Wind for Prosperity creates a world of new opportunities to provide clean water, health care, irrigation, educational opportunities, communications infrastructure, and other social and economic benefits for rural communities where such opportunities are now lacking or limited—and does so on self-sustaining commercial terms.

We made this film to inform, engage and inspire. I hope we were successful and that you share the message because ending energy poverty is truly a race we must win.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Elon Musk: Tesla Battery Will 'Fundamentally Change the Way the World Uses Energy'

Solar Capacity in the U.S. Enough to Power 4 Million Homes

Renewables Beat Fossil Fuels Second Year in a Row

Show Comments ()

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Sponsored
Adventure
Muir Woods, which costs $10 for entry, will have free entry on Sept. 22. m01229 / Flickr / CC BY-NC 2.0

Visit Any National Park for Free This Saturday to Celebrate 25th National Public Lands Day

If you're stuck for plans this weekend, we suggest escaping your city or town for the great outdoors.

This Saturday marks the 25th National Public Lands Day, organized by the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF).

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
A glacier flows towards East Antarctica. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / CC BY 2.0

Temperatures Possible This Century Could Melt Parts of East Antarctic Ice Sheet, Raise Sea Levels 10+ Feet

A section of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet that contains three to four meters (approximately 10 to 13 feet) of potential sea level rise could melt if temperatures rise to just two degrees above pre-industrial levels, a study published in Nature Wednesday found.

Researchers at Imperial College London, the University of Queensland, and other institutions in New Zealand, Japan and Spain looked at marine sediments to assess the behavior of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin during warmer periods of the Pleistocene and found evidence of melting when temperatures in Antarctica were at least two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels for periods of 2,500 years or more.

Keep reading... Show less
Energy
Oil well in North Dakota. Tim Evanson / Flickr / CC BY-SA 2.0

Pipeline Leaks 63,840 Gallons of Produced Water in North Dakota

A pipeline released 63,840 gallons (1,520 barrels) of produced water that contaminated rangeland in Dunn County, North Dakota, the Bismarck Tribune reported, citing officials with the North Dakota Department of Health.

Produced water is a byproduct of oil and gas extraction, and can contain drilling chemicals if fracking was used.

Keep reading... Show less
Insights
Residents stand in a long queue to fill water containers on May 27 in Shimla, India. Deepak Sansta / Hindustan Times / Getty Images

World Peace Requires Access to Safe Water

International Peace Day is Sept. 21. Mekela Panditharatne, attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council, submitted the following op-ed to EcoWatch in commemoration.

In drought-ravaged East Africa, the cracks in the plains echo the fault lines splitting tribes.

Across the globe, the devastation of deadly brawls is being exacerbated by tensions over access to water. Water crises, often worsened by governance failures, can portend warning signs for instability and conflict. This year, the World Resources Institute cautioned that water stress is growing globally, "with 33 countries projected to face extremely high stress in 2040." The effects of such water stress span the gamut from civil unrest to open warfare.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Food

How Your Personality Type Could Influence Your Food Choices

By Melissa Kravitz

"You are what you eat" may be one of the oldest sayings ever to be repeated around the dinner table, but can you also eat what you are?

Keep reading... Show less
Climate
A child rides his bicycle in an area affected by the Hurricane Maria passing in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico on Oct. 5, 2017. RICARDO ARDUENGO / AFP / Getty Images

Hurricane Maria's Legacy: One Year Later

As Puerto Rico marked one year since Hurricane Maria made landfall yesterday, the Miami Herald this week ran extensive reports in English and Spanish on the island's continuing recovery.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored
Science
A foldable, biodegradable battery based on paper and bacteria. Seokheun Choi / Binghamton University, CC BY-ND

Could Paper Power the Next Generation of Devices?

By Seokheun Choi

It seems like every few months there's a new cellphone, laptop or tablet that is so exciting people line up around the block to get their hands on it. While the perpetual introduction of new, slightly more advanced electronics has made businesses like Apple hugely successful, the short shelf life of these electronics is bad for the environment.

Keep reading... Show less
Business
Blue Point Brewing Company

Long Island Brewer Launches 'Good Reef Ale' to Help Restore New York’s Oyster Reefs

Between the 1600s and the early 20th century, European settlers in New York City ate their way through 220,000 acres of oyster reefs covering 350 square miles, The Washington Post reported.

Keep reading... Show less
Sponsored

mail-copy

The best of EcoWatch, right in your inbox. Sign up for our email newsletter!