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Sam Branson: Why Ending Energy Poverty Is a Race We Must Win

Insights + Opinion

"When you are faced with a crisis, you either feel paralyzed by fear or feel empowered to make a change."

That is a quote the amazing Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor once told me, and it's exactly how I feel when it comes to facing a challenge.

It's why I embarked on a three-month expedition to the Arctic to highlight climate change, and it's why I travelled from London to the Matterhorn in Switzerland entirely under human power to raise money for life skills programs around the UK.

I care about this planet deeply, and trying to make the world a better place is something that drives me every day. This is a wonderful world—it's not just a place we live in, but it's a living and fragile entity that needs to be cared for.

One of those crisis' that the world is facing is energy poverty. More than 1.3 billion people in the world lack access to the very things that we take as granted—affordable and reliable electricity. That is a staggering and very worrying statistic, and it needs to be dealt with. That is why I am delighted there is a day of action today, May 6, to highlight energy poverty.

I set up my production company, Sundog Pictures, to make a difference by telling stories that matter and help to change the way people see the world. That is the power of films—they can take vast and complex subjects and make you understand them in an engaging and entertaining way. They can change your view of the world in a very short space of time.

Narrated by Scarlett Johansson, our #aRaceWeMustWin film is a hard hitting short that deals with the facts about energy poverty.

As Scarlett says, “As someone who cares deeply about this planet, the idea that in this day and age young children die every year due to lack of electricity is simply unacceptable"

"What people want in life is a purpose. They don't want to merely survive—what they want is an opportunity to provide a life for themselves and a chance to prove their worth. Getting them out of energy poverty gives them that opportunity."

There are many great initiatives out there that are trying to empower the lives that are in danger, and this film is part of the Wind for Prosperity journey that Sundog Pictures are proudly telling the story of.

Anchored on wind power technology, Wind for Prosperity aims to help the tens of millions of people that are in energy poverty and live in areas with abundant wind resources. Wind for Prosperity creates a world of new opportunities to provide clean water, health care, irrigation, educational opportunities, communications infrastructure, and other social and economic benefits for rural communities where such opportunities are now lacking or limited—and does so on self-sustaining commercial terms.

We made this film to inform, engage and inspire. I hope we were successful and that you share the message because ending energy poverty is truly a race we must win.

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