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Rubblebucket joins Artists Against Fracking on Jimmy Kimmel Live!

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Artists Against Fracking

During Rubblebucket’s performance, trumpet player Alex Toth wore a t-shirt that read, “The Sky is Pink,” a reference to Gasland Director Josh Fox’s latest short film.

Last night, Brooklyn based band Rubblebucket performed their hit song, Came Out of Lady on Jimmy Kimmel Live!

The appearance marked the band joining the newly formed group Artists Against Fracking, whose members total more than 100 artists including Josh Fox, Sean Lennon, Mark Ruffalo, Yoko Ono, Lady Gaga, Leonardo DiCaprio, Zooey Deschanel and MGMT.

Artists Against  Fracking is an initiative of musicians, actors and other celebrities to build awareness of the destructive effects of fracking. Yoko Ono and Sean Lennon launched Artists Against Fracking and appeared on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. The initiative came together as a response to Gov. Cuomo’s intention of lifting the moratorium on fracking in New York.
 
During Rubblebucket's performance, trumpet player Alex Toth wore a t-shirt designed by lead singer Anakalmia Traver that read, “The Sky is Pink,” a reference to Gasland Director Josh Fox’s latest short film addressing the “urgent crisis of drilling and fracking in New York State.”
 
Click here for more information about Artists Against Fracking.

If you haven't already seen the Sky is Pink, watch below:

Visit EcoWatch’s FRACKING page for more related news on this topic.

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