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Rocket Trike Diaries—Week Two

Energy

Tom Weis

Welcome to Rocket Trike Diaries—a 10 week video tour of the 2011 "Ride for Renewables: No Tar Sands Oil On American Soil!" Join Renewable Rider Tom Weis as he pedals his rocket trike 2,150 miles through America’s heartland in support of landowners fighting TransCanada’s toxic Keystone XL tar sands pipeline scheme. Here are the video entries from Week Two:

Video Entry #9: Missouri River Threatened by Keystone XL

Renewable Rider Tom Weis reflects on threats to America's riverways as he pedals the rocket trike across the mighty Missouri River in Montana. A spill from the Keystone XL tar sand pipeline could spell catastrophe for this river and all who depend on its precious water.

Video Entry #10: Montana Rancher to Obama: "We Need Help."

Renewable Rider Tom Weis hears third-generation rancher Chuck Nerud of Circle, Mont. talk about TransCanada's plans to run the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline three and a half miles through his property. Saying, "TransCanada thinks that they can come in here and take what they want," he emphasizes, "they don't show respect" for landowners. Calling tar sands "a highly toxic substance," he says, "it should be left in the ground." Chuck calls on President Obama to "stand up and protect us."

Video Entry #11: Rocket Triking Across Yellowstone River

Renewable Rider Tom Weis rocket trikes across the Yellowstone River in Glendive, Mont. on an old steel bridge. He reflects on the threats posed to this national treasure by TransCanada's toxic Keystone XL tar sands pipeline.

Video Entry #12: "Tour of Resistance" Goes Old School

Renewable Rider Tom Weis goes "old school," making a conference call with tribal allies from a phone booth in Ekalaka, Mont. where no cell phone service was available. Ron Seifert scouted the town in advance, locating the phone booth, which conveniently had a folding chair inside.

Video Entry #13: Rocket Triking Through Oil Country

Renewable Rider Tom Weis pedals the rocket trike past oil wells just outside of Baker, Mont. Ron Seifert comments on how TransCanada has the option of pumping other crude into the Keystone XL mix here in Baker.

Video Entry #14: Goodbye, Montana.

Renewable Rider Tom Weis reflects on life and death as he bids goodbye to Big Sky Country on the Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance." He shares the beauty of eastern Montana from the cockpit of the rocket trike on a gorgeous fall day.

Video Entry #15: Rocket Triking Downhill

Renewable Rider Tom Weis shares what it's like racing downhill in the rocket trike during the Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance."

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