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Rocket Trike Diaries—Week Three

Energy

Tom Weis

Welcome to Rocket Trike Diaries—a 10 week video tour of the 2011 "Ride for Renewables: No Tar Sands Oil On American Soil!" Join Renewable Rider Tom Weis as he pedals his rocket trike 2,150 miles through America’s heartland in support of landowners fighting TransCanada’s toxic Keystone XL tar sands pipeline scheme. Here are the video entries from Week Three:

Video Entry #16: Oglala Lakota Nation Solidarity March (Part V)

Members of the Oglala Sioux Tribe greet Renewable Rider Tom Weis with a powerfully inspiring solidarity march against TransCanada's toxic "Keystone XL" tar sands pipeline proposal in Pine Ridge, S.D.

Video Entry #17: Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance" Welcomed to Oglala Lakota Nation

Renewable Rider Tom Weis, Ron Seifert and the Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance" are welcomed to Oglala Lakota Nation in a most sacred & powerful fashion.

Video Entry #18: Riding "Warrior"

Renewable Rider Tom Weis gets taken for a ride by "Warrior" in Kiza Park near Pine Ridge, S.D., prior to being joined by Daryl Hannah, cowboys and Lakota tribal leaders in a solidarity ride against Keystone XL.

Video Entry #19: Daryl Hannah Joins "Cowboys & Indians" on Horseback to Fight Keystone XL

Daryl Hannah, Cowboys & Oglala Lakota & Sicangu Lakota tribal leaders join Renewable Rider Tom Weis on horseback in support of the Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance." It is powerful alliances such as these that will beat back TransCanada's toxic tar sands pipeline proposal.

Video Entry #20: "Cowboys & Indians" Alliance Formed Against Keystone XL

Ron Seifert films Oglala Lakota elder Alex White Plume shake hands with rancher Paul Siemens in a show of solidarity against the exploitation of Alberta's dirty tar sands, as Daryl Hannah & Sicangu Lakota Hereditary Chief John Spotted Tail look on.

Video Entry #21: "Cowboys & Indians" Join Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance"

Daryl Hannah and "Cowboys and Indians" join the Keystone XL "Tour of Resistance" near Pine Ridge, SD. Great Plains "Cowboys" are being described as the new "Indians" with their land being taken from them by a foreign invader. Keystone XL has united them in common cause.

Video Entry #22: Lakota Elder to Obama: "Be a Man and Be a Leader."

Renewable Rider Tom Weis listens to Oglala Lakota elder Alex White Plume call on President Obama to protect his people's treaty territory (Ft. Laramie Treaty of 1868) from TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline. Alex asks President Obama to have compassion & "step up and be a man and be a leader around the world in human rights."

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