Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Robust Project Pipeline to Make U.S. Third-Largest Solar Market in the World

Business
Robust Project Pipeline to Make U.S. Third-Largest Solar Market in the World

Forty-three gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) energy are waiting in the U.S. project pipeline, giving the country's industry a third-place global ranking, according to a market research firm.

NPD Solarbuzz's United States Deal Tracker report shows that the solar industry is being driven by a slew of projects that are 30 megawatts (MW) and smaller. The U.S. market is expected to trail only China and Japan next year.

“The increase in new solar PV projects being planned or under construction is driving double-digit annual growth forecasts for PV adoption within the United States,” said Michael Barker, a senior analyst at NPD Solarbuzz. “Large-scale PV projects exceeding 20 megawatts continue to dominate the pipeline, in terms of installed capacity, stimulated by state-based renewable portfolio mandates. Projects of all sizes have become increasingly viable, due to declines in solar PV system pricing in the past year.”

Graphic credit: NPD Solarbuzz

Those 43 GW are enough to power 6 million homes.

The amount of projects 30 MW or lower that are in the pre-planning, planning, installation or delayed stages grew by 33 percent in 2012. NPD believes that growth is being pushed by solar developers using smaller projects to meet the Business Energy Investment Tax Credit's (ITC) 2017 deadline.

“This deadline is causing a shift in focus to smaller projects that can be completed on shorter timescales,” said Christine Beadle, an analyst at NPD Solarbuzz.

Graphic credit: NPD Solarbuzz

Still, a few projects exceeding 100 MW are dominating short-term U.S. solar PV deployment, according to NPD. They include the Mount Signal Solar and Desert Sunlight projects. The 10 largest solar PV projects account for more than 5 GW of new capacity expected to go live in the next three years.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLES page for more related news on this topic.

A dugong, also called a sea cow, swims with golden pilot jacks near Marsa Alam, Egypt, Red Sea. Alexis Rosenfeld / Getty Images

In 2010, world leaders agreed to 20 targets to protect Earth's biodiversity over the next decade. By 2020, none of them had been met. Now, the question is whether the world can do any better once new targets are set during the meeting of the UN Convention on Biodiversity in Kunming, China later this year.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

President Joe Biden signs executive orders in the State Dining Room at the White House on Jan. 22, 2021 in Washington, DC. Jabin Botsford / The Washington Post via Getty Images

By Andrew Rosenberg

The first 24 hours of the administration of President Joe Biden were filled not only with ceremony, but also with real action. Executive orders and other directives were quickly signed. More actions have followed. All consequential. Many provide a basis for not just undoing actions of the previous administration, but also making real advances in public policy to protect public health, safety, and the environment.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Melting ice forms a lake on free-floating ice jammed into the Ilulissat Icefjord during unseasonably warm weather on July 30, 2019 near Ilulissat, Greenland. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

A first-of-its-kind study has examined the satellite record to see how the climate crisis is impacting all of the planet's ice.

Read More Show Less
Probiotic rich foods. bit245 / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Ana Maldonado-Contreras

Takeaways

  • Your gut is home to trillions of bacteria that are vital for keeping you healthy.
  • Some of these microbes help to regulate the immune system.
  • New research, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, shows the presence of certain bacteria in the gut may reveal which people are more vulnerable to a more severe case of COVID-19.

You may not know it, but you have an army of microbes living inside of you that are essential for fighting off threats, including the virus that causes COVID-19.

Read More Show Less
Michael Mann photo inset by Joshua Yospyn.

By Jeff Masters, Ph.D.

The New Climate War: the fight to take back our planet is the latest must-read book by leading climate change scientist and communicator Michael Mann of Penn State University.

Read More Show Less