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Robert Redford: Fossil Fuels Need to Stay in the Ground, Renewable Energy Is the Future

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Robert Redford: Fossil Fuels Need to Stay in the Ground, Renewable Energy Is the Future

Democracy Now!'s Amy Goodman sat down today with Robert Redford, the Oscar-winning director, actor and longtime environmentalist, at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

In the interview, Goodman jumps right in by asking Redford, founder of Sundance Film Festival, about last week’s vote where half of the Senate refused to formally acknowledge the existence of man-made climate change.

“I think the deniers of climate change are probably the people who are afraid of change. They don't want to see change,” Redford tells Goodman. “Too many in Congress are pushing us back into the 1950s.”

Goodman also asks Redford, a long-time opponent of the Keystone XL, about the attempt by the new Republican majority in Congress to approve construction of the controversial pipeline. “I had a lot of experience with oil,” he says, noting that he once worked in the oil fields. “I think it should stay in the ground. We're so close to polluting the planet beyond anything sustainable.”

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