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River Rally 2012—The Largest International Gathering of Water Protection Advocates

River Rally 2012—The Largest International Gathering of Water Protection Advocates

River Network and Waterkeeper Alliance

The Largest International Gathering of Water Protection Advocates Floats into Portland for River Rally 2012

When two bodies of water come together in a confluence, each stream provides its unique characteristics to form a more powerful entity. The same can be said of River Rally 2012, when River Network and Waterkeeper Alliance join forces to convene the largest gathering ever of clean water advocates.

From May 4-7, more than 700 national and international environmental leaders will join together in Portland, Oregon to share best practices for watershed restoration, stormwater management, water quality monitoring, water and energy conservation, green infrastructure, habitat restoration, safe drinking water and more.

For the first time, River Network and Waterkeeper Alliance are joining forces to host River Rally. Participants will hail from more than 40 U.S. states as well as Bangladesh, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Czech Republic, Ecuador, India, Iraq, Mexico, Peru, Senegal and the United Kingdom.

Where:  Doubletree Hotel Lloyd Center, 1000 NE Multnomah, Portland, OR

What:

Lisa Jackson, Administrator, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Keynote – The State of the Nation’s Waterways and The Clean Water Act at 40
Friday May 4, 6:30 - 8 p.m.

Alexandra Cousteau, National Geographic Emerging Explorer
Keynote – Expedition Blue Planet - Age of Limits: 21st Century Water Management
Saturday May 5, 8:30 - 9:30 a.m.

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Senior Attorney for Natural Resources Defense Council,
President of Waterkeeper Alliance

Saturday May 5, 8 - 9 p.m. Keynote

Clean Water Act at 40 Plenary Panel
David Beckman-Director of National Water Program, NRDC; Karl Coplan-Professor of Law, Pace University;
Ellen Gillinsky-Senior Policy Advisor Office of Water, US EPA; Gayle Killam-Deputy Director Rivers & Habitat, River Network
Monday 8:30 - 10 a.m.

Rebecca Wodder, Assistant Secretary, Fish, Wildlife & Parks, U.S. Department of the Interior
Announcement - Willamette River being designated a National Water Trail
Monday May 7, 1 - 1:30 p.m.

River Heroes Awards Banquet
Dr. Azzam Alwash-Nature Iraq (Iraq); Terry Backer-Long Island Soundkeeper (CT); Susan Heathcoate-Iowa Environmental Council (IA); John Wathen-Friends of Hurricane Creek (AL); George Wolfe-LA River Expeditions (CA)
Monday May 7, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Sponsors: KEEN Footwear, Tom’s of Maine, Patagonia, U.S. EPA, Bridgestone Americas, USGS, Coca-Cola Company, Toyota, U.S. Forest Service, StormwateRx, Budweiser, City of Portland-Office of Healthy Working Rivers, Scotts MiracleGro Company, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and dozens more.

For more information on River Rally, click here.

 

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