Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Ritz and Goldfish Crackers Recalled Due to Possibly Contaminated Whey Powder

Food
Ritz and Goldfish Crackers Recalled Due to Possibly Contaminated Whey Powder
Mike Mozart / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

By Dan Nosowitz

Bad news for fans of cheesy crackers. Sorry, wait: bad news for everyone.


This week, two purveyors of some of America's finest crackers, Ritz and Goldfish (owned by Mondelez International and Pepperidge Farm, respectively) announced recalls due to fears of salmonella contamination.

The culprit seems to come from a supplier of whey powder. During the cheesemaking process, a coagulant—either acid or rennet—is added to dairy, clumping up solids together and leaving a liquid behind. The solids are formed into cheese; the liquid is whey, and it's a very useful ingredient. When dried into a powder, whey is used to assist a cheesy flavor in crackers, and also has some preservative functions. Whey: good!

Unless it's contaminated with salmonella, that is. Salmonella is a bacteria that causes upwards of 1.2 million illnesses and 450 deaths per year in the U.S. alone. As a result, Mondelez International is recalling many of its products that contain that weird cheese spread, include Ritz Bits cheese cracker sandwiches. Pepperidge Farm's recalls include Flavor Blasted Xtra Cheddar and Sour Cream and Onion flavored Goldfish, regular (not blasted with flavor) Xtra Cheddar Goldfish, and a mix that includes said normal, non-blasted Goldfish.

Both companies say that this is a precautionary measure and that no illnesses have been reported from the affected products.

In recent years, an uptick in reported foodborne illnesses has resulted in reports that the FDA's recall system is hopelessly slow. (The USDA is responsible for recalls of meat, poultry, and eggs; the FDA handles all other food recalls.)

Reposted with permission from our media associate Modern Farmer.

Related Articles Around the Web
U.S. returns create about 15 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions. manonallard / Getty Images

Many people shop online for everything from clothes to appliances. If they do not like the product, they simply return it. But there's an environmental cost to returns.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Climate Envoy John Kerry (L) and President-elect Joseph (R) are seen during Kerry's ceremonial swearing in as Secretary of State on February 6, 2013 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong / Getty Images

By Dolf Gielen and Morgan Bazilian

John Kerry helped bring the world into the Paris climate agreement and expanded America's reputation as a climate leader. That reputation is now in tatters, and President-elect Joe Biden is asking Kerry to rebuild it again – this time as U.S. climate envoy.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Scientific integrity is key for protecting the field against attacks. sanjeri / Getty Images

By Maria Caffrey

As we approach the holidays I, like most people, have been reflecting on everything 2020 has given us (or taken away) while starting to look ahead to 2021.

Read More Show Less
A pair of bears perch atop Brooks Falls in Alaska's Katmai National Park, about 100 miles from the proposed Pebble Mine site. Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Environmental campaigners stressed the need for the incoming Biden White House to put in place permanent protections for Alaska's Bristol Bay after the Trump administration on Wednesday denied a permit for the proposed Pebble Mine that threatened "lasting harm to this phenomenally productive ecosystem" and death to the area's Indigenous culture.

Read More Show Less

OlgaMiltsova / iStock / Getty Images Plus

By Gwen Ranniger

In the midst of a pandemic, sales of cleaning products have skyrocketed, and many feel a need to clean more often. Knowing what to look for when purchasing cleaning supplies can help prevent unwanted and dangerous toxics from entering your home.

Read More Show Less