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Inspiring Music Video Celebrates World Water Day

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Inspiring Music Video Celebrates World Water Day

The Atlanta-born, Appalachian-bred, New Orleans-seasoned soulful Folk/World troubadours Rising Appalachia released their latest music video today in honor of World Water Day.


Rising Appalachia is honored to release Rivermouth in partnership with Waterkeeper Alliance, the largest and fastest growing nonprofit solely focused on clean water. Waterkeeper Alliance is a global movement uniting more than 300 Waterkeeper organizations and affiliates around the world, focusing citizen advocacy on issues that affect our waterways, from pollution to climate change. Waterkeepers patrol and protect nearly 2.5 million square miles of rivers, streams and coastlines in the Americas, Europe, Australia, Asia and Africa.

Rising Appalachia brings to listeners a collection of sounds, stories and songs steeped in tradition and a devotion to world culture. Intertwining a deep reverence for folk music and a passion for justice, they have made it their life's work to sing songs that speak to something ancient yet surging with relevance. This video release is an ongoing part of the band's "Slow Music Movement"—an effort to promote sustainability, engage with activist networks, bring local outreach to each event and continuing to create and promote sustainable practices within the music industry.

"Rivermouth is a love song ... Both human and elemental," Chloe Smith of Rising Appalachia said. "The depths of the human heart and the force of a river are both wild and unchartered at their core, best left alone to swell and stretch and change with the seasons. We have been aligned with the Mississippi River, Gulf and Kalamath water protectors and recently branched out to form alliances with Waterkeepers around the world, working towards drinkable, fishable, swimmable water everywhere."

Christian Aslund / EyeEm / Getty Images

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