Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Watch Richard Branson Sink This WWII Ship and Giant Steel Octopus

Popular
Watch Richard Branson Sink This WWII Ship and Giant Steel Octopus
Owen Buggy

By Sabrina Imbler

The Kodiak Queen had a long, storied life. One of five vessels to survive the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship later traveled up north to serve as an Alaska king crab vessel and salmon tender.


She was one of the largest crab vessels at the time, plus one of the only converted WWII ships to have changed careers to seafood. She spent years in commercial fishing, and a significant part of her life submerged partially underwater due to disuse.

At the turn of the 21st century, it seemed like the Kodiak Queen had lived out her best years and had no future, at least above the waves.

But then Project YOKO B.V.I. Art Reef came along. The multisyllabic project wanted to save coral reefs and give an honorific burial to a ship that had served her country time and time again.

And so the Kodiak Queen was given a new mission. Watch here:

The project is a collaboration between Sir Richard Branson, the artist collective Secret Samurai Productions, the social justice group Maverick1000, the ocean nonprofit Beneath the Waves and the British Virgin Islands nonprofit Unite BVI, the New York Times reported. In other words, there are a lot of hands on deck.

The project began when historian Mike Cochran found the ship rusting in a junkyard and created a website to try to save the Kodiak Queen. The site soon caught the eye of none other than Richard Branson, the famed British philanthropist, who approved a proposal to convert the ship into an artificial reef.

But it's not just the Kodiak Queen that sunk back beneath the waves. Secret Samurai Productions spent several months cleaning up the ship and designing a monstrous sea-monster kraken with 80-foot-long tentacles and a frame of pure steel.

And so the final product that sunk to the bottom of the sea comprised a noble ship past her glory days and a conservation-minded artificial reef shaped like a giant octopus.

In the months following the Kodiak Queen's sinking, scientists are monitoring the fish populations that have chosen the ship and its resultant reef as their new home.

They're particularly excited by the prospect of making a home for the goliath grouper, a titanic fish that's been disappearing from the water of the British Virgin Islands.

Recreational divers will soon be able to dive by the wreck and see the kraken up-close, as well as a healthy community of fish and corals.

Reposted with permission from our media associate Azula.

Radiation-contaminated water tanks and damaged reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant on Feb. 25, 2016 in Okuma, Japan. Christopher Furlong / Getty Images

Japan will release radioactive wastewater from the failed Fukushima nuclear plant into the Pacific Ocean, the government announced on Tuesday.

Read More Show Less
EcoWatch Daily Newsletter
Antarctica's Thwaites Glacier, aka the doomsday glacier, is seen here in 2014. NASA / Wikimedia Commons / CC0

Scientists have maneuvered an underwater robot beneath Antarctica's "doomsday glacier" for the first time, and the resulting data is not reassuring.

Read More Show Less
Trending
Journalists film a protest by the environmental organization BUND at the Datteln coal-fired power plant in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany on April 23, 2020. Bernd Thissen / picture alliance via Getty Images

By Jessica Corbett

Lead partners of a global consortium of news outlets that aims to improve reporting on the climate emergency released a statement on Monday urging journalists everywhere to treat their coverage of the rapidly heating planet with the same same level of urgency and intensity as they have the COVID-19 pandemic.

Read More Show Less
Airborne microplastics are turning up in remote regions of the world, including the remote Altai mountains in Siberia. Kirill Kukhmar / TASS / Getty Images

Scientists consider plastic pollution one of the "most pressing environmental and social issues of the 21st century," but so far, microplastic research has mostly focused on the impact on rivers and oceans.

Read More Show Less
A laborer works at the site of a rare earth metals mine at Nancheng county, Jiangxi province, China on Oct. 7, 2010. Jie Zhao / Corbis via Getty Images

By Michel Penke

More than every second person in the world now has a cellphone, and manufacturers are rolling out bigger, better, slicker models all the time. Many, however, have a bloody history.

Read More Show Less