Quantcast

Research Shows Strong Renewable Energy Laws Reduce Climate Change Pollution

Climate

U.S. Energy Information Administration

The Extended Policies case, released yesterday as part of the U.S Energy Information Administration (EIA)'s Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013), shows that extending certain federal energy efficiency and renewable energy laws and regulations could reduce annual energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S. in 2040 by roughly 6 percent relative to a reference case projection that generally assumes current laws and policies. Between 2013 and 2040, this reduction adds up to a cumulative emission savings approaching 5 billion metric tons.

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2013.

 

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Outlook 2013.

Projected emissions reductions result from decreased energy consumption as well as additional energy production from low-carbon resources. In 2040, the extended policies case projects 4 quadrillion Btu lower annual U.S. energy consumption than the reference case. The cumulative amount of energy use is 55 quadrillion Btu lower between 2013 and 2040.

The extended policies case differs from the reference case, which generally reflects policies as they exist in spring 2013, including the assumption that any sunset dates (for example, scheduled expirations for tax credits) or other scheduled milestones occur as specified in law. In the extended policies case, EIA explores the possible effects of the indefinite continuation of certain provisions that have expiration dates and the expansion of certain energy laws and regulations.

The extended policies case includes key assumptions affecting:

  • Electric power
  • Residential and commercial buildings
  • Transportation
  • Industry

The continuation of the production tax credit for wind, biomass, geothermal and other renewable resources and the investment tax credit for solar generation technologies exemplify the policy extensions included in this case.

For a discussion of assumptions and results, see the full Issues in Focus article on the No Sunset and Extended Policy cases in AEO2013. The full article also features a discussion of a special case investigating the effects of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 passed by Congress on Jan. 1, 2013.

Visit EcoWatch’s RENEWABLE ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Click here to tell Congress to Expedite Renewable Energy.

 

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Protesters march during a "Friday for future" youth demonstration in a street of Davos on Jan. 24 on the sideline of the World Economic Forum annual meeting. FABRICE COFFRINI / AFP / Getty Images

By Andrea Germanos

Youth climate activists marched through the streets of Davos, Switzerland Friday as the World Economic Forum wrapped up in a Fridays for Future demonstration underscoring their demand that the global elite act swiftly to tackle the climate emergency.

Read More
chuchart duangdaw / Moment / Getty Images

By Tim Radford

The year is less than four weeks old, but scientists already know that carbon dioxide emissions will continue to head upwards — as they have every year since measurements began leading to a continuation of the Earth's rising heat.

Read More
Sponsored
Lucy Lambriex / DigitalVision / Getty Images

By Katey Davidson

Each year, an estimated 600 million people worldwide experience a foodborne illness.

While there are many causes, a major and preventable one is cross-contamination.

Read More
picture alliance / dpa / F. Rumpenhorst

By Arthur Sullivan

When was the last time you traveled by plane? Various researchers say as little as between 5 and 10 percent of the global population fly in a given year.

Read More
A Starbucks barista prepares a drink at a Starbucks Coffee Shop location in New York. Ramin Talaie / Corbis via Getty Images

By Cathy Cassata

Are you getting your fill of Starbucks' new Almondmilk Honey Flat White, Oatmilk Honey Latte, and Coconutmilk Latte, but wondering just how healthy they are?

Read More