Quantcast

Report Chronicles International Grassroots Fight Against Coal in 2013

Energy

The Sierra Club’s International Climate Program released a report yesterday detailing international victories against coal and in favor of clean energy in 2013. The report points to a worldwide movement demanding a move beyond dirty coal. The 24-page report includes grassroots success stories from the U.S., Germany, China, Australia, India, Indonesia and Bangladesh that spotlight the defeat or slowdown of exports, power plants and mines.

“The coal industry’s prospects in the U.S. are on the decline, thanks to strong grassroots activism to defend our health, air and water,” said Michael Brune, Sierra Club executive director. “And as these coal companies look to peddle their dirty fossil fuel abroad, communities worldwide are banding together to say no to toxic coal and polluted air and water."

"We are committed to moving beyond coal in the U.S. and supporting partners, colleagues and communities abroad that are stepping up to stop the expansion of dirty coal.”

Over the years, the Sierra Club has worked with a growing international network of activists around the globe. These activists and the communities they represent are organizing to defeat power plants and mines that pollute air and water and cause harm to the health and safety of the environment and workers. Their efforts are making a difference.

“The Sierra Club’s International Climate Program is proud to tell the stories of local, grassroots activists who have tirelessly defended their communities, health and livelihoods from dirty coal,” said John Coequyt, director of the Sierra Club’s International Climate Program. “From contaminating drinking water to polluting the air, forcing evictions and destroying local economies, big coal is stooping to every low possible to force their dirty fuel on communities."

"Thankfully," Coequyt continued, "they haven’t been successful.”

On top of the grassroots struggles detailed in this report, governments and multilateral banks have helped the world move beyond coal in 2013. President Obama’s Climate Action Plan included a call to end financing for overseas coal projects and was echoed by five Nordic countries, the UK, the World Bank, the European Investment Bank, and most recently, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Visit EcoWatch’s COAL page for more related news on this topic.

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Variety of fermented food korean traditional kimchi cabbage and radish salad. white and red sauerkraut in ceramic plates over grey spotted background. Natasha Breen / REDA&CO / Universal Images Group / Getty Image

By Anne Danahy, MS, RDN

Even if you've never taken probiotics, you've probably heard of them.

These supplements provide numerous benefits because they contain live microorganisms, such as bacteria or yeast, which support the healthy bacteria in your gut (1, 2, 3, 4).

Read More Show Less
Pexels

Singapore will become the first country in the world to place a ban on advertisements for carbonated drinks and juices with high sugar contents, its health ministry announced last week. The law is intended to curb sugar consumption since the country has some of the world's highest diabetes rates per capita, as Reuters reported.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored

A typical adult takes around 20,000 breaths per day. If you live in a megacity like Beijing, with many of those lungfuls you're likely to inhale a noxious mixture of chemicals and pollutants.

Read More Show Less
Fred Stone holds his brown swiss cow Lida Rose at his Arundel dairy farm on March 18 after a press conference where he spoke about PFAS chemical contamination in his fields. Gregory Rec / Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

By Susan Cosier

First there was Fred Stone, the third-generation dairy farmer in Maine who discovered that the milk from his cows contained harmful chemicals. Then came Art Schaap, a second-generation dairy farmer in New Mexico, who had to dump 15,000 gallons of contaminated milk a day.

Read More Show Less
Protesters attend the 32nd annual Fur-Free Friday demonstration on Nov. 23, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. Ella DeGea / Getty Images

California Governor Gavin Newsom signed into law a bill that that bans the sale and manufacture of fur products in the state. The fur ban, which he signed into law on Saturday, prohibits Californians from selling or making clothing, shoes or handbags with fur starting in 2023, according to the AP.

Read More Show Less
Sponsored
Watchfield Solar Park in England. RTPeat / Flickr / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Simon Evans

During the three months of July, August and September, renewables generated an estimated total of 29.5 terawatt hours (TWh), compared with just 29.1TWh from fossil fuels, the analysis shows.

Read More Show Less
A demonstrator waves an Ecuadorian flag during protests against the end of subsidies to gasoline and diesel on Oct. 9 in Quito, Ecuador. Jorge Ivan Castaneira Jaramillo / Getty Images

The night before Indigenous Peoples' Day, an Indigenous-led movement in Ecuador won a major victory.

Read More Show Less
Protesters block the road outside Mansion House in London during an XR climate change protest. Gareth Fuller / PA Images via Getty Images

One week into Extinction Rebellion's planned two weeks of International Rebellion to demand action on the climate crisis, the London police have banned the group from the city.

Read More Show Less