Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Wind Energy Is on the Rise in the Great Plains

Renewable Energy
Wind Energy Is on the Rise in the Great Plains

Wind whipping across the Great Plains can generate a lot of electricity. But transporting that electricity from remote areas to cities and towns can be a big task.


"It's not something that can be solved on an individual state basis or an individual company basis," said Nick Brown, CEO of Southwest Power Pool.

Southwest Power Pool oversees the electricity grid in parts of 14 states, including Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma.

In April, the organization briefly generated more than 65 percent of its power from wind — a national record for a regional grid operator.

Brown says it took a lot of work to get to that point.

Utilities invested $10 billion on transmission projects across the region.

And it's required complex coordination between different utilities to send the wind power to where it's needed at any given moment.

But Brown says Southwest Power Pool's success shows utilities can transition to less polluting sources of power.

"It is imperative that this industry and, quite frankly, the whole U.S. economy move to a net-zero carbon situation," he said. "We just have to move in that direction."

Reposted with permission from Yale Climate Connections.

Marsh Creek in north-central California is the site of restoration project that will increase residents' access to their river. Amy Merrill

By Katy Neusteter

The Biden-Harris transition team identified COVID-19, economic recovery, racial equity and climate change as its top priorities. Rivers are the through-line linking all of them. The fact is, healthy rivers can no longer be separated into the "nice-to-have" column of environmental progress. Rivers and streams provide more than 60 percent of our drinking water — and a clear path toward public health, a strong economy, a more just society and greater resilience to the impacts of the climate crisis.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A Brood X cicada in 2004. Pmjacoby / CC BY-SA 3.0

Fifteen states are in for an unusually noisy spring.

Read More Show Less

Trending

A creative depiction of bigfoot in a forest. Nisian Hughes / Stone / Getty Images

Deep in the woods, a hairy, ape-like man is said to be living a quiet and secluded life. While some deny the creature's existence, others spend their lives trying to prove it.

Read More Show Less
President of the European Investment Bank Werner Hoyer holds a press conference in Brussels, Belgium on Jan. 30, 2020. Dursun Aydemir / Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

By Jon Queally

Noted author and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben was among the first to celebrate word that the president of the European Investment Bank on Wednesday openly declared, "To put it mildly, gas is over" — an admission that squares with what climate experts and economists have been saying for years if not decades.

Read More Show Less

A dwarf giraffe is seen in Uganda, Africa. Dr. Michael Brown, GCF

Nine feet tall is gigantic by human standards, but when researcher and conservationist Michael Brown spotted a giraffe in Uganda's Murchison Falls National Park that measured nine feet, four inches, he was shocked.

Read More Show Less