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2 Republican Governors Pass Major Clean Energy Bills, Eyes Now on Ohio

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2 Republican Governors Pass Major Clean Energy Bills, Eyes Now on Ohio

Three Midwestern states are closing out the year with big clean energy changes on the horizon.

Both Illinois and Michigan passed major clean energy bills in the last hours of their lame duck sessions, encouraged by the state's Republican governors.

And while Ohio's legislature extended a freeze on the state's renewables standards, earlier comments from Gov. Kasich indicate he may veto the bill.

"Ohio lawmakers decided to significantly stall the state's clean energy efforts, putting politics over economic growth," Dick Munson, Midwest clean energy director for Environmental Defense Fund, said. "The governor should continue the leadership he has demonstrated and reject this harmful legislation, so Ohio can get back to work building its clean energy economy, opening the door to well-paying jobs and millions in investment."

Dave Anderson, policy and communications manager for the Energy and Policy Institute, agrees. "Governor Kasich has an opportunity to show that Ohio's energy policy is not for sale to utility lobbyists by vetoing HB 554 and unfreezing clean energy in the Buckeye State," he said.

In Minnesota, while a Republican legislature could curtail progress on the state's emissions reductions plans, some policymakers have hinted that clean energy policies could be ground for bipartisan compromise.

Michigan, Ohio, Illinois: Midwest Energy News

Minnesota: Midwest Energy News, MPR News

Commentary: Crain's Chicago Business, Will Kenworthy op-ed

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