Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Renewable Energy Investments Set New Record, Twice That of Coal and Gas

Energy
Renewable Energy Investments Set New Record, Twice That of Coal and Gas

Global investment in renewable energy was more than twice that of coal and gas last year, according to a new report, despite plummeting fossil fuel prices.

A wind farm in Washington state. Photo credit: Daniel Parks / flickr

Renewable energy investment totaled a record $286 billion, with China, India, Brazil and other developing countries accounting for $156 billion in 2015. China’s investment alone rose 17 percent from the year prior, representing 36 percent of the global total. Experts expect this surge to continue, while coal remains in decline; China also announced this week that they will be suspending construction of new coal mines in 15 provinces.

Investment in the U.S. also rose dramatically, while Europe’s fell by $49 billion, despite a surge in offshore wind. This global upward trend in renewables must continue to grow for many countries to meet their Paris climate targets, analysts caution.

For a deeper dive:

News: Washington Post $, Climate Central,The Guardian, Carbon Brief, Mashable, Bloomberg, Climate Home, BBC, Think Progress,Phys.org, New ScientistBusinessGreen

Commentary: Vox, Brad Plumer columnGrist, Clayton Aldern column

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Mark Ruffalo and Annie Leonard: We Must Rebuild Our Democracy

Rockefeller Fund Divests From Fossil Fuels, Slams Exxon

Bill McKibben: Fracking Has Turned Out to Be a Costly Detour

James Hansen: Dangerous Sea Level Rise Will Occur in Decades, Not Centuries

Reindeers at their winter location in northern Sweden on Feb. 4, 2020, near Ornskoldsvik. JONATHAN NACKSTRAND / AFP via Getty Images

Sweden's reindeer have a problem. In winter, they feed on lichens buried beneath the snow. But the climate crisis is making this difficult. Warmer temperatures mean moisture sometimes falls as rain instead of snow. When the air refreezes, a layer of ice forms between the reindeer and their meal, forcing them to wander further in search of ideal conditions. And sometimes, this means crossing busy roads.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

The Great Lakes, including Lake Michigan, experienced some of their warmest temperatures on record in the summer of 2020. Ken Ilio / Moment / Getty Images

Heatwaves are not just distinct to the land. A recent study found lakes are susceptible to temperature rise too, causing "lake heatwaves," The Independent reported.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Starfish might appear simple creatures, but the way these animals' distinctive biology evolved was, until recently, unknown. FangXiaNuo / Getty Images

By Aaron W Hunter

A chance discovery of a beautifully preserved fossil in the desert landscape of Morocco has solved one of the great mysteries of biology and paleontology: how starfish evolved their arms.

Read More Show Less
U.S. President Joe Biden sits in the Oval Office as he signs a series of orders at the White House in Washington, D.C. on January 20, 2021. Jim Watson / AFP / Getty Images

President Joe Biden officially took office Wednesday, and immediately set to work reversing some of former President Donald Trump's environmental policies.

Read More Show Less
Erik McGregor / LightRocket / Getty Images

In many schools, the study of climate change is limited to the science. But at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, students in one class also learn how to take climate action.

Read More Show Less