Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Renewable Energy Investments Set New Record, Twice That of Coal and Gas

Energy
Renewable Energy Investments Set New Record, Twice That of Coal and Gas

Global investment in renewable energy was more than twice that of coal and gas last year, according to a new report, despite plummeting fossil fuel prices.

A wind farm in Washington state. Photo credit: Daniel Parks / flickr

Renewable energy investment totaled a record $286 billion, with China, India, Brazil and other developing countries accounting for $156 billion in 2015. China’s investment alone rose 17 percent from the year prior, representing 36 percent of the global total. Experts expect this surge to continue, while coal remains in decline; China also announced this week that they will be suspending construction of new coal mines in 15 provinces.

Investment in the U.S. also rose dramatically, while Europe’s fell by $49 billion, despite a surge in offshore wind. This global upward trend in renewables must continue to grow for many countries to meet their Paris climate targets, analysts caution.

For a deeper dive:

News: Washington Post $, Climate Central,The Guardian, Carbon Brief, Mashable, Bloomberg, Climate Home, BBC, Think Progress,Phys.org, New ScientistBusinessGreen

Commentary: Vox, Brad Plumer columnGrist, Clayton Aldern column

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Mark Ruffalo and Annie Leonard: We Must Rebuild Our Democracy

Rockefeller Fund Divests From Fossil Fuels, Slams Exxon

Bill McKibben: Fracking Has Turned Out to Be a Costly Detour

James Hansen: Dangerous Sea Level Rise Will Occur in Decades, Not Centuries

Columbia Basin pygmy rabbits. Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

The wildfires that roared through Eastern Washington in September had a devastating impact on an extremely endangered species of rabbit.

Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

A protestor in NYC holds up a sign that reads, "November Is Coming" on June 14, 2020 in reference to voting in the 2020 presidential election. Ira L. Black / Corbis / Getty Images

By Mark Hertsgaard

What follows are not candidate endorsements. Rather, this nonpartisan guide aims to inform voters' choices, help journalists decide what races to follow, and explore what the 2020 elections could portend for climate action in the United States in 2021 and beyond.

Read More Show Less

Trending

Activists fight a peat fire in Siberia in September. ALEXANDER NEMENOV / AFP via Getty Images

The wildfires that ignited in the Arctic this year started earlier and emitted more carbon dioxide than ever before.

Read More Show Less
A metapopulation project in South Africa has almost doubled the population of cheetahs in less than nine years. Ken Blum / Wikimedia Commons / CC by 3.0

By Tony Carnie

South Africa is home to around 1,300 of the world's roughly 7,100 remaining cheetahs. It's also the only country in the world with significant cheetah population growth, thanks largely to a nongovernmental conservation project that depends on careful and intensive human management of small, fenced-in cheetah populations. Because most of the reserves are privately funded and properly fenced, the animals benefit from higher levels of security than in the increasingly thinly funded state reserves.

Read More Show Less
A new super enzyme feeds on the type of plastic that water and soda bottles are made of, polyethylene terephthalate (PET). zoff-photo / iStock / Getty Images Plus

Scientists are on the brink of scaling up an enzyme that devours plastic. In the latest breakthrough, the enzyme degraded plastic bottles six times faster than previous research achieved, as The Guardian reported.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch