Quantcast
Environmental News for a Healthier Planet and Life

Help Support EcoWatch

Renewable Energy Barn Built in Path of Keystone XL Pipeline

Renewable Energy Barn Built in Path of Keystone XL Pipeline

Bold Nebraska

A solar- and wind-powered barn built by volunteers on land directly inside the proposed route of TransCanada's Keystone XL pipeline was dedicated on Sunday, in a ceremony near tiny Benedict, NE, that drew 200 people and featured speakers including energy investor and philanthropist Tom Steyer.

Pipeline protestors gathered in the early morning hours to paint no-KXL signs that will hang on Nebraska barns along the proposed route of the Keystone XL pipeline. Photo credit: Mary Anne Andrei/ Bold Nebraska

Many at the dedication ceremony were volunteers who had joined in a four-day community barn-raising to construct the Build Our Energy Barn. Led by Bold Nebraska with partners Nebraska Farmers Union, 350.org, CREDO and the Sierra Club, the Build Our Energy Barn is to be an educational resource; a place where the community can learn and discover sustainable energy alternatives that serve to benefit the agricultural industry. Wind and solar energy are much more than just viable, renewables are an ecological and economic necessity that builds—not threatens—our communities.

The barn is located on land near York, NE, that has been stewarded by the Hammond, Harrington & Kleinschmidt family for six generations.

Volunteers work to erect the Renewable Energy Barn. Photo credit: Mary Anne Andrei / Bold Nebraska

"As a Nebraska farmer and rancher, I know just how challenging it is to produce the food that sustains us," said Meghan Hammond, a sixth-generation family farmer on whose land the barn was built. "Climate change has already disrupted other farmers and my ability to supply nutritional sustenance that all of our families rely on." 

"The last thing we needed was a pipeline that threatened and compromised resources that we depend on season after season, generation after generation," concluded Hammond. 

Due to the location of the Build Our Energy Barn, should President Obama ultimately approve a permit for Keystone XL, TransCanada will either have to reroute the pipeline, or demolish a community-serving, sustainable energy structure.

The Harrington sisters—Abbi Kleinschmidt, Terri, and Jenni—pose with philanthropist and anti-KXL activist Tom Steyer on their family land after the dedication ceremony for the Build Our Energy solar- and wind-powered barn that now stands on the proposed route of the Keystone XL pipeline.

Photo credit: Mary Anne Andrei/ Bold Nebraska

"Investing in local and clean energy is what builds communities and our nation," said Tom Steyer, energy investor. "President Obama has a clear choice, do we build our clean and local energy, or do we allow a foreign corporation to use our land and risk our water for their bottom line. Our President must put our national interest over TransCanada's interest to expand and export tar sands."

Supporters gather for the dedication ceremony of the Build Our Energy solar- and wind-powered barn west of Benedict, NE.

Photo credit: Mary Anne Andrei/ Bold Nebraska

The Build Our Energy barn project was funded with $65,000 raised from more than 1,200 online donors, and constructed by volunteers across two weekends this month. In addition to raising the barn, volunteers also painted "#NoKXL" billboards to place with landowners along the proposed pipeline route.

Visit EcoWatch’s KEYSTONE XL page for more related news on this topic.

——–

Sun Cable hopes to start construction of the world's largest solar farm in 2023. Sun Cable
A large expanse of Australia's deserted Outback will house the world's largest solar farm and generate enough energy to export power to Singapore, as The Guardian reported.
Read More Show Less

EcoWatch Daily Newsletter

Construction on the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric station in 2015. Government of Newfoundland and Labrador / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

By Tara Lohan

In 1999 a cheering crowd watched as a backhoe breached a hydroelectric dam on Maine's Kennebec River. The effort to help restore native fish populations and the river's health was hailed as a success and ignited a nationwide movement that spurred 1,200 dam removals in two decades.

Read More Show Less

Trending

We pet owners know how much you love your pooch. It's your best friend. It gives you pure happiness and comfort when you're together. But there are times that dogs can be very challenging, especially if they are suffering from a certain ailment. As a dog owner, all you want to do is ease whatever pain or discomfort your best friend is feeling.

Read More Show Less
A new study has revealed that Earth's biggest mass extinction was triggered by volcanic activity that led to ocean acidification. Illustration by Dawid Adam Iurino (PaleoFactory, Sapienza University of Rome) for Jurikova et al (2020)

The excess carbon dioxide emitted by human activity since the start of the industrial revolution has already raised the Earth's temperature by more than one degree Celsius, increased the risk of extreme hurricanes and wildfires and killed off more than half of the corals in the Great Barrier Reef. But geologic history shows that the impacts of greenhouse gases could be much worse.

Read More Show Less
Coronavirus-sniffing dogs Miina and Kössi (R) are seen in Vantaa, Finland on September 2, 2020. Antti Aimo-Koivisto / Lehtikuva / AFP/ Getty Images

By Teri Schultz

Europe is in a panic over the second wave of COVID-19, with infection rates sky-rocketing and GDP plummeting. Belgium has just announced it will no longer test asymptomatic people, even if they've been in contact with someone who has the disease, because the backlog in processing is overwhelming. Other European countries are also struggling to keep up testing and tracing.

Meanwhile in a small cabin in Helsinki airport, for his preferred payment of a morsel of cat food, rescue dog Kossi needs just a few seconds to tell whether someone has coronavirus.

Read More Show Less

Support Ecowatch