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REGISTER TODAY: Mountain Justice Spring Break

Energy

Mountain Justice Spring Break

Since 2007, Mountain Justice Spring Break (MJSB) has been offering students and young people an exciting, fun, low-cost alternative spring break in Appalachia.
 
Mountain Justice Spring Break is a chance to learn more about how extractive industries like coal, hydro-fracking for natural gas and nuclear energy have sucked billions of dollars in resources from the land, while leaving behind environmental and social problems, and a ravaged land.
 
At Mountain Justice Spring Break you will:

  • Learn about and take action against the destructive effects of the dirty life-cycles of coal and natural gas.
  • Stand in solidarity with the communities in Virginia, West Virginia and southwest Pennsylvania facing the ongoing destruction of coal mining and hydraulic fracturing.
  • See mountaintop removal coal mining and hydraulic fracturing natural gas extraction up close.
  • Take direct action against the dirty coal industry.

MJSB will bring together coalfield residents, college students, environmentalists and concerned citizens. You dont have to be an expert about coal mining or fracking or Appalachia—our program will teach you the intricacies of resource extraction and you will leave with a better understanding of why Appalachia is a rich land with poor people.
 
From March 2-10, MJSB will be in the historic old mining town of Appalachia, Virginia, in the far western corner of the state of Virginia, in an area that is being heavily impacted by mountaintop removal mining.
 
From March 10-17, 2013 MJSB will be in central West Virginia surrounded by fracking sites.
 
We will spend a week cultivating the skills and visions needed to build a sustainable energy future in Appalachia. Through education, community service, speakers, hiking, music, poetry, direct action and more, you will learn from and stand with Appalachian communities in the struggle to maintain our land and culture. Mountain Justice Spring Break will also offer a variety of community service projects, Appalachian music and dancing.
 
Mountain Justice Spring Break in Virginia will be held at the Community Center in the historic mining town of Appalachia. Nearby Black Mountain is being blasted right now by coal companies and you will see the effects on the forests, water, land and people. Coal trains rumble through this small community, which was once a thriving mining town. Register today!

Mountain Justice Spring Break in West Virginia will be held at a remote rural lodge in a county park surrounded by a winding creek and the beautiful rolling hills of West Virginia—and lots of fracking for natural gas. The lodge is modern and comfortable, easy to access from Interstates 77 and 79 and US 50. There are bunk beds for 90 people and hot showers, or you can camp in the park. Register today!

Check out this great video from MJSB 2008:

Visit EcoWatch’s MOUNTAINTOP REMOVAL, FRACKING AND ENERGY page for more related news on this topic.

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Click here to tell Congress to Expedite Renewable Energy.

 

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